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11 posts tagged "Catherine Baba"

Out Of Africa (And Into The Marais)

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Yaz Kurhan, better known as her nom de jewelry Yazbukey, is not one to hide her light under a bushel. For her “Fabulous African Saga” accessories and new home decor, Kurhan took over Tigersushi in Paris’ Marais neighborhood for a collection launch party with her likeminded friends, including stylists Catherine Baba and Elisa Nalin (above left, with Kurhan), Purple‘s Caroline Gaimari, Lanvin’s Elie Top, Sarah Lerfel from Colette, and Michelle Harper, in town from New York for Couture week. Fancy friends, however, doesn’t make for a stuffy hostess: Kurhan comfortably installed herself on a throne made of plastic grocery-store crates (made for the occasion by Diplomates, the Paris art collective) and greeted her guests.

Kurhan chose Africa as the theme for her Fall collection, based on childhood memories growing up in Saudi Arabia. “My dad was part of the Turkish embassy there and he organized the Islamic conference for many years,” she said. “I remember playing with the children of all the African dignitaries at the conference, and although I’ve never visited Africa, I got a feeling for its diversity from that experience.” Kurhan, who divides her time between Paris and New York (where she dreams up accessories for Zac Posen’s Z Spoke line), continues to work in Plexiglas, creating flattened versions of everyday Africana, including flora, fauna, and everything in between. Case in point: There are tiger’s paw necklaces with scratch-mark traces, snake sunglasses, and banana hair pins—as well as a ghetto blaster bag. And for the first time, plastic wall decals join the wearable offerings, including a portrait of Naomi Campbell and a lion’s head.

Photo: Courtesy of Yazbukey

Ask The Experts:
What Are You Snapping Up This Summer?

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For our latest Shopping Guide, senior market editor Marina Larroude asked a fresh round of style insiders for their ultimate summer picks. This season, designers Eugenie Niarchos, Sara Battaglia, and Jen Kao, stylist Catherine Baba, models Caroline Brasch Nielsen and Alexandra Richards, editors Victoria Young (of Love), Julia Sarr-Jamois (of Wonderland), and Miroslava Duma, and consultant Ramya Giangola fill us in on the Tom Ford cat-eyes, Dries Van Noten kimonos, crochet bikinis, and Louis Vuitton fans they can’t do without—plus a few occasionally surprising details about themselves.

Who drinks almond milk and vodka when the thermostat climbs? Who counts Nancy Reagan as an early style icon? Read on for more.

Click here to visit the Summer Shopping Guide >

Above, left to right: Victoria Young, Caroline Brasch Nielsen, Julia Sarr-Jamois, Catherine Baba, and Caroline Sieber, all shot by Tommy Ton.

Photos: Tommy Ton

A Magazine And Acne Paper Play Host In Paris

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The party people were out in force on Friday night in Paris’ Marais to celebrate the latest editions of two—get this—print magazines. The revolving-editor A Magazine chose Giambattista Valli to helm its new issue: his chosen theme, “real beauty,” and his cover, a portrait of River Phoenix by Michael Tighe (above right). Marina Abramovic, Nan Goldin, Chiara Clemente, Lee Radziwill, Peter Schlesinger, and Kenzo Takada all collaborated on the tenth issue, as did Sasha Pivovarova, who did a series of self-portraits. “This magazine is about what nourishes me; it’s another way to show my inspirations,” said Valli, who opened his exploration with a 1975 quote from Yves Saint Laurent: “What we imagine may be very beautiful but nothing replaces reality.” (To buy, visit www.bruil.info.)

Around the corner at the very private Maison de La Chasse, Maria Berenson and editor Thomas Persson (below right) co-hosted a fête for the new issue of Acne Paper, the Studio Issue, and Kristin Scott Thomas and Bruno Frisoni (below left), Nicola Formichetti, Lanvin’s Lucas Ossendrijver and Elie Top, and Catherine Baba all dropped by to mill in the hunting house’s drawing rooms. The mag includes visits to, or representations of, the studios of artists like Matisse, Pollock, and Hockney, as well as photographic portfolios by Helmut Lang and Eric Boman. A nude Leigh Bowery (shot by Bruce Bernard as he sat for a portrait with Lucien Freud) appears on the cover (above left), and hostess Berenson is inside, shot by Katerina Jebb in Jean Cocteau’s house in Milly-La-Forêt. “Marisa’s grandmother, Elsa Schiaparelli, was so close to Cocteau it was natural to shoot her in his old house,” Persson explained of the spread, “and Acne is based on the idea of a creative collective, so we focused on artists’ studios as the place where creativity happens.” (To buy, visit Acne, 10 Greene St., NYC, or www.acnestudios.com.)

Photos: Courtesy of A Magazine; Courtesy of Acne Paper

Celebrating The Crystal Vision In Paris

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The weather outside was frightful, but it would take more than six inches of snow to intimidate the revelers who packed into the Salon Anglais of the Four Seasons George V in Paris to fête the tenth anniversary of Swarovski Crystal Palace, the lighting and design arm of Swarovski’s multifaceted empire, and the publication of its anniversary tome, The Art of Light and Crystal. For their debut in the City of Light, an array of one-off Crystal Palace pieces—such as Light Sock by architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the best-selling Blossom by Tord Boontje, and the giant, faceted Rock Crystal by Hariri and Hariri—were showcased in a tent in the hotel’s courtyard, where they will stay until mid-January. Meanwhile, the lobby greets visitors with sheets of crystal panels borrowed from the Oscar curtain and a scaled-down version of the Yves Béhar chandelier created for New York’s JFK airport.

The party was the culmination of a design steeplechase for Nadja Swarovski, who, having just come from the art and design fairs in Miami, yesterday presented the first Swarovski fragrance (on counters in March). No sooner was this temporary show mounted than she began polishing new projects. “This was my childhood dream,” she said as she surveyed the scene, dressed in a black Dior knit dress with a Holly Fulton necklace and Matthew Williamson cuff. “I grew up making bracelets out of pink crystal chandelier components. And there’s still so much to do—the possibilities are endless and we’ve only scratched the surface.” What might that mean? Swarovski allowed that more design-driven products are in the works, “but in an unexpected way.” Yes, she’ll still take emerging designers from runway to jewelry for Atelier Swarovski, but there may be new terrain yet to explore both with proven talents (Galliano is on her wish list) and in new fields (a music connection, perhaps?).

The crowd was chic, but these were not your usual suspects. Alongside perennial fashion fixtures such as stylist Catherine Baba and the model/athlete Aimee Mullins (left), jewelry designer Betony Vernon, and designer Nicolas Andreas Taralis were deliberately downtown characters, from a Midwestern dancer at the Opéra Garnier (in a crystal-laden Viktor & Rolf smoking jacket) to a Cossack in Nina Ricci heels and the rising indie music act known as Brigitte. And by day, the crystal-gloved DJ turned out to be none other than accessories designer Erik Halley (right, with Swarovski).

Photos: Olivier Borde

Creature Comfort

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One of the great pleasures, in our humble opinion, of the end of fashion month—besides the much-deserved nap, of course̵is going through all of Tommy Ton’s street-style pics to see who wore what, when, and where. Here in the office, we’re agog over the Nicholas Kirkwood for Peter Pilotto De Stijl-style heels with tie-dye socks, Catherine Baba’s endless collection of turbans, the predominance of Prada’s pre-fall camo prints, the models still in their runway makeup. But this gremlin purse (above) may be the most surprising thing we’ve seen throughout the whole crazy month—which is surely deserving of a tip of the hat. Needless to say, the complete TT slideshow is well worth a long and considered reflection.

Photo: Tommy Ton