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August 22 2014

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24 posts tagged "Cathy Horyn"

Cathy Horyn Resigns From the New York Times

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Cathy HorynNews broke this morning that Cathy Horyn — the New York Times‘ inimitable fashion critic of fifteen years—has resigned. The decision was due to her desire to spend more time with her partner, Art Ortenberg. This is just one of the recent shake-ups at the Times: Eric Wilson left his post for InStyle back in November, and was replaced with new hires John Koblin and, starting Monday, former Style.com deputy editor Matthew Schneier. This is a markedly new era for the Times‘ historically fierce fashion coverage, and industry insiders no doubt have a lot of questions about the future of the paper’s fashion department — the least of which is to whom should we address our open letters now?

Photo: Katy Wunb/ Getty Images

Marc Jacobs Turns Back the Clock

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Vuitton clock

What’s old is new, according to Marc Jacobs. Today, WWD ran a lengthy interview with the designer about his departure from Vuitton and his plans to take his own company public. But amid questions about Jacobs’ future, Bridget Foley inquired why, at his final show for Vuitton in Paris, did he decide to make the clock on his set run backward? “That was a very last-minute decision. I thought of Vivienne Westwood and World’s End. The clock in front of World’s End, the punk store on King’s Road, ran backwards,” explained Jacobs. “This was my cynical comment on everything that I had read from people like Cathy Horyn about what was new,” he continued. “I had just been so fed up with hearing what’s new and what’s modern and all that stuff. One has to define what new is…. And then I went back to that Chanel quote, “Only those with no memory insist on their originality.” So this thing of, like, there’s nothing wrong with looking back. Looking back creates something new, which is exactly what I felt we did…we made a new collection for Louis Vuitton by looking back.” Sometimes, you’ve just gotta turn back time to find the way.

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo/ Indigitalimages.com

Is It Time To Celebrate, Not Lament, Fashion’s Revolving Door?

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How much does it matter who's behind the Margiela mask?The rumor mill is churning again today, with a choice bit of unconfirmed gossip: Wags are wondering if London designer Marios Schwab isn’t lending a hand to the famously anonymous Maison Martin Margiela. Margiela himself exited the company in 2009, and ever since there have been rumors and reports of other designers—most recently former Céline hand Ivana Omazic—guiding the design team. The Margiela team’s only comment was that it does not communicate on who its designers are, and, in the words of WWD, “characterizing its studio as a creative collective with members of long standing that it feeds regularly with new contributors.”

While the impetus to unmask single design geniuses is an understandable one, it may be a model that’s falling out of date. It begs the question: Should we always have one designer to point to, or is a more team-spirited approach the better way? Certainly Margiela has been on an upswing these last few seasons.

The Maison is not alone in adopting, happily, a revolving door mentality. When Christopher Kane left Versus, Donatella Versace opted not to hire a single designer in his place, but to invite a series of guests to try their hands. (First up, J.W. Anderson; second, M.I.A.) And in a recent editorial on the fate of Jil Sander after the departure (again) of Jil Sander, Cathy Horyn wondered aloud if the best practice wouldn’t be to build a strong design team. It’s not hard to imagine that being refreshed with new talent as talent arrives.

Something to think about, as several large houses—from Louis Vuitton to Sander—go, for the moment, without single stewards.

Photo: Gianni Pucci / InDigital | GoRunway

Memorable Moments From Galliano’s Sit-down With Charlie Rose

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John Galliano on Charlie Rose

Between Ingrid Sischy’s interview in Vanity Fair‘s July issue, Jonathan Newhouse’s profession of support, Cathy Horyn’s call for him to pave his own way back, and last night’s Charlie Rose sit-down, John Galliano has been monopolizing headlines of late. And understandably so—the pair of interviews marked the first time the former Dior designer spoke with journalists on the subject of his racist rant and struggle with addiction that ultimately led to his dismissal from the storied fashion house. If you missed his sober chat with Rose—during which Galliano was almost unrecognizable, having traded his signature matador and pirate ensembles for a blue oxford and blazer—we suggest you give it a watch. Galliano, who sometimes inspires sympathy and sometimes doesn’t, told Rose that it would be his last interview on the topic (he said additional discussions wouldn’t be “wise”). Here, a rundown of the apologetic designer’s most notable comments on such topics as Lee McQueen, the infamous video, his recovery, and his comeback.

On the video and the aftermath:

“No one was more shocked than myself, Charlie… At that point in my career I had become what is known as a blackout drinker. It’s where one can’t transfer short-term memory into long-term memory, so I have no memory of that event.”

“I was emotionally, spiritually, physically, mentally bankrupt. I didn’t know it, but I had a very big breakdown. Nervous breakdown, mental breakdown, emotional breakdown. I didn’t know, but I couldn’t begin to describe how that felt. And I was in denial.”

“[Natalie Portman] was right to say what she said. What I said was disgusting.”

On success and addiction:

“Along with all the successes came more collections. At that moment I was producing 32 collections a year between the house of Galliano and the house of Dior. And each collection would comprise about 1,000 pieces. Would you like me to run through the collections for you? We won’t have time.”

“By then, I was a slave to alcohol, then I would take the Valium to stop the shaking to do the fittings, and the sleeping pills so I could sleep. I was traveling a lot and my life became unmanageable.” Continue Reading “Memorable Moments From Galliano’s Sit-down With Charlie Rose” »

The Couture World And The Real World

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The Haute Couture shows, which wrapped in Paris this week, are the summa of impossible luxury in the world of fashion. Whatever you can do with clothes (and much of what you think you can’t) gets done. Put plainly, couture is a fantasy. But it doesn’t take much prodding to wonder about the reality, given that couture looks—those actually purchased, not lent to celebrities for red-carpet occasions—cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and that those on the sidelines have been bewailing the death of couture since the midcentury. Especially in times of economic downturn, a question looms over the proceedings: Does anyone buy?

On her blog today, Cathy Horyn put the question to a few houses and came back with an answer: yes. Sidney Toledano, Dior’s president, has said that the sales of Raf Simons’ first couture collection improved on that of prior ones, to the tune of double-digit growth. Even the more untraditional designs—a three-piece suit, for example—find clients. “We have more orders than our capacity,” Toledano said. Karl Lagerfeld confirmed buyers for his Chanel Couture, too. Horyn hints that they’re largely Russian, as well as Chinese and Middle Eastern. “Lately I’ve heard some incredible stories,” she teases, dropping only that one Russian Chanel client bought twenty outfits in a span of two hours. In the absence of journalistic muckraking, the world can only await the arrival of a headline-grabbing memoir called Confessions of a Couture Client. Here’s hoping some free-spending Muscovite can be convinced to step up.

Photo: Marcus Tondo / InDigital / GoRunway