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April 20 2014

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9 posts tagged "Cecil Beaton"

Paris’ Musée Galliera Gets a New Show, More Dough

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Parkinson and Clarke

Olivier Saillard has struck again. For Papier Glacé, the second exhibition he has curated at Paris’ newly renovated Musée Galliera, Saillard riffled through one hundred years of Condé Nast’s photography archives, pulling mainly from a handful of international Vogues (American, British, German, French, and Italian), to spin a selective history of fashion-as-dialogue. The 150-image show scans like a who’s who of 20th-century lensmen: Images by De Meyer, Horst, Clark (above, right), Schatzberg, Penn, Man Ray, Parkinson (above, left), Beaton, Blumenfeld, Lindbergh, Meisel, Turbeville (below), and Weber, among others, feature in the show. The snaps are accompanied by a dozen or so dresses and accessories, such as an evening coat by Doucet (1913), a Mondrian cocktail dress by Yves Saint Laurent (1965), and a red molded bustier on loan from Issey Miyake (1980).

“Fashion-related exhibitions so often tend to run chronologically, looking toward the past,” offered Paris Vogue editor Emmanuelle Alt, “whereas a magazine comes out every month, it’s life, and it’s constantly changing. [With this show] you see what each brings to the other.” Saillard concurred, noting that fashion magazines are akin to archeologists.

Turbeville

For Alt and for Paris Vogue, the eighteen months spent collaborating on Papier Glacé was far from an end in itself. Rather, it marked the beginning of a new chapter for the nearly one hundred-year-old publication, with the establishment of the Vogue Paris Fashion Fund—a new initiative that will allow the Galliera to make new acquisitions, be they photographs, garments, accessories, or beyond. Launched with a contribution of 100,000 euros, the fund will be renewed annually and receive additional backing via fundraising.

When asked for his wish list, Saillard offered names ranging from Margiela to Corinne Day, Comme des Garçons, Junya Watanabe, Iris van Herpen, and Jurgen Teller. “I am always interested in auteurs. To look at our archives, you’d think that everyone has always worn Balenciaga,” he quipped. “I plan to shop myopically: Sometimes the exceptional can be found in an ‘ordinary’ shirt.”

It’s a fair bet that spending the Galliera’s first windfall won’t be too difficult for Saillard, but new acquisitions will be kept under wraps until July 9, the night of the first Vogue Paris Fashion Fund gala event, during haute couture.

Photos: courtesy of the Musée Galliera

Draw Something: Fashion Illustration Takes the Spotlight

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Illustrations by David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Last night in London, Christie’s South Kensington auction house played host to an exhibition and discussion orchestrated by the Fashion Illustration Gallery (FIG). And while the audience sat through the Issa London-sponsored talk, whose panel included Christie’s Meredith Etherington-Smith, illustrator David Downton (whose work is pictured above, top left), and Style.com’s Tim Blanks, they were left wondering: Should astute art investors buy up fashion illustration in the same way the world should have snatched up early Basquiat or Koons? “Before Andy Warhol was Andy Warhol, he was a fashion illustrator,” said Etherington-Smith. “Fifty years ago, the art world debated whether photography was a bona fide art form, and the same is happening now with fashion illustration. I believe there is no doubt fashion illustration is an art, but a vastly underappreciated one.”

The art on display last night represented the old guard like Cecil Beaton, Antonio Lopez (above, bottom left), and Andy Warhol, as well as such new talents as Gary Card (above, top right), Zoë Taylor (above, bottom right), and Tanya Ling. Strange bedfellows? Not according to Downton. “Some of the younger fashion illustrators out there are the most skilled draftsmen,” he said. “They very much should take their place alongside the great artists of days gone.”

Among the questions thrown out to an audience that included Suzy Menkes, Camilla Al Fayed, and Susie Bubble: Will fashion illustration ever be accepted as an art form? And will magazine editors ever replace celebs for illustrations? Downton, perhaps, answered these queries best. “The illustration I did a few years back of Cate Blanchett for Australian Vogue was, against all odds, the fastest-selling issue of the year. It also won the Maggie’s Magazine Cover of the Year. After that, there was no doubt for me that there is a place in the art world for fashion illustration.”

FIG’s exhibition at Christie’s South Kensington runs through December 19.

Illustrations: David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Gaby Aghion to Receive the French Legion of Honor

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Gabi Aghion Following last year’s much-touted Chloé Attitudes retrospective in Paris, not to mention the world tour of its 60th anniversary book, Parisian house Chloé has achieved yet another milestone, or rather, its founder, Gaby Aghion has. The 92-year-old Egyptian-born designer, who launched Chloé in 1952, will receive France’s prestigious Legion of Honor in Paris on December 17, reports WWD. Previous recipients of the award include Azzedine Alaïa, Cecil Beaton, Josephine Baker, and Valentino Garavani.

Photo: Raymond Aghion

’Tis the Season…

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Gift Guide

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about what you’ll be giving (and, of course, requesting) this holiday season. If you need some inspiration, take a peek at our holiday shopping guide, which is packed with goodies for everyone from your rocker pals to sporty snow bunnies to uptown gals (and don’t miss our corresponding grungy tale of holiday thievery). Need a few more suggestions? Over the next few days, we’ll be divulging what our editors are planning to gift, and hoping to get. Have a look at our first picks, below.

Nicole Phelps

NICOLE PHELPS, EXECUTIVE EDITOR
To Get: I’d love a one-month unlimited class package to Physique 57. With a 5-year-old at home, making time to work out is the biggest luxury there is.

To Give: I received a pair of Hatch‘s navy cashmere joggers as a gift about a year ago. They instantly became my at-home uniform; I wore them just about every night last winter. I know my mom and sister will be thrilled to receive pairs of their own. Hatch founder Ariane Goldman has opened a temporary shop at 25 Howard Street here in New York through Thanksgiving weekend, so it’ll be easy for me to go snap them up.

Katharine K. Zarrella

KATHARINE K. ZARRELLA, ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
To Get: All I really want for Christmas is a ticket to London so I can go and explore the Isabella Blow: Fashion Galore! exhibition at Somerset House. But seeing as it’s highly unlikely that I’ll be hopping the pond in the near future, I’d be equally pleased to receive this pair of Fendi booties. I wear my Fall ’10 Yves Saint Laurent mohawk pumps pretty aggressively, so it would be nice to have another footwear option that’s similarly coiffed.

To Give: I think everyone should own a vintage silk kimono. Every single person. They’re incredibly comfortable and wildly glamorous for lounging around the apartment. A few of my friends have been pining after my latest acquisition—a black, red, and gold embroidered kimono that was once owned by the 1934 Miss Japan—so I will be gifting them equally spectacular robes. My favorite kimono scavenging spots are obscure antique shops on the Upper West Side and Joe Sundlie’s vintage store in Chelsea. But this forties number from 1stdibs.com would do nicely.

Rachel Walgrove

RACHEL WALGROVE, SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR
To Get: I’ve been eyeing LPD’s sportswear for a while. I love how it pairs team spirit with the cultlike following found in fashion. This Team Ghesquière tee is definitely on my list.

To Give: Anyone who follows me on Instagram knows that my family is obsessed with dachshunds—though I like to blame this mostly on my sister. These Jonathan Adler bookends would be the perfect complement to her impressive book collection.

Erica Blumenthal

ERICA BLUMENTHAL, CONTRIBUTING MARKET EDITOR
To Get: I don’t think you need a reason for why I want these python Gianvito Rossi pumps.

To Give: I plan to buy several copies of Morrissey’s Autobiography as soon as it hits U.S. stores on December 3. Most of my friends are dying to read it, so why not give them what they want?

Photos: Mesdemoiselles (illustration); Courtesy Photos

Mario Testino Goes Back To His Roots

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Mario Testino's Alta Moda

In past interviews, Mario Testino has alluded that his childhood in Peru was that of a misfit. He was the fashion-crazed oddball in a traditional Catholic family, and by his early twenties, he had left his native Lima for London. So it would seem a touch ironic that Testino returned to Peru to shoot what are arguably some of the most fantastical fashions of his career. Alta Moda, on view at Manhattan’s Queen Sofia Spanish Institute, is the culmination of five years’ work photographing traditional costumes worn by the people of the mountain city of Cusco. All twenty-seven images on view are a window into a lush world rarely seen—particularly by Testino’s usual audiences. The opulent outfits were shot against a traditional painted backdrop from the archives of Martin Chambi, Peru’s seminal indigenous photographer. Below, Testino talks to Style.com about the couture-caliber costumes, his fascination with tradition, and the show’s notable departure from his usual oeuvre.

The name of the show is Alta Moda. What similarities did you see between these costumes and traditional haute couture?
I am known more for shooting a dress like a couture dress, so I thought the game of words was interesting: on one side it’s called Alta Moda because [the costumes com from] the highest region of Peru and “alta” means “high.” The other reason was because these dresses have been made with the same care and the same attention with which a couture dress is made, and it’s lasted for hundreds of years. They repeat the same tradition of embroidery, of the stitching, of the weaving, and couture is like that. There’s a parallel to it, so I thought it made a lot of sense to use that name.

In terms of a jumping-off point with the costumes you were shooting, was it more of an aesthetic connection initially, or a cultural connection?
I think it is a mixture of cultural and aesthetic. This is something I have always been interested in. When you look at my career, in a funny way, I’ve always been doing things related to tradition. I do the royal families, I go to Seville for the holy week and the fair of Seville, when all Sevillians go out into the streets dressed in flamenco dresses, on their horses. I’ve done the same thing with the Catholic church. I did a little exhibition called Disciples, and I went to Rome and photographed all the bishops and the cardinals dressed in their costumes. So the whole resurgence of costumes is something that has always fascinated me, and I’m always being drawn back to it. I guess it’s a mixture between culture and beauty, and aesthetics.

Mario Testino Alta ModaAs someone who doesn’t do many exhibitions, what made you want to show these images?

I opened a cultural institute in Peru called MATE, and I have to come up with exhibitions for them constantly. That’s what originally made me do this exhibition, because I thought it would be interesting for Peruvians to see something they have that maybe they don’t look at normally. It’s like everything: when you have it down your doorstep, you don’t look at it, and maybe you take it for granted. I went to do a job for British Vogue in this region, Cusco, which is the highest in Peru. The thing that brought me to discover this archive of treasures was that I asked for some costumes for some of my fashion pictures for the magazine, and when I saw the whole collection, I thought, “I have to document this.”

You used archival backdrops from the collection of Martin Chambi. What was your intention in doing that? Was it an homage?
I was very influenced when I saw an exhibition at the Photographers’ Gallery in London of Martin Chambi in the early eighties, because being Peruvian, I didn’t know about this work, and when I discovered it, I was quite surprised, really, that somebody had documented so well a region that we were all a bit ignorant about. When I arrived in England, I taught myself everything about Europe by looking at photographers like Cecil Beaton, or August Sander, who documented their society, their country, their history, and when I saw this exhibition of Martin Chambi, his portraits were particularly amazing in front of these backdrops. But the thing that caught my attention the most was going to Peru and finding these costumes, it reminded me that I had seen once a picture of Irving Penn’s, from when he had gone to Peru and photographed children against these backdrops. I thought it was an interesting way to bring all the photos together, and to really concentrate on the clothes. Continue Reading “Mario Testino Goes Back To His Roots” »