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August 20 2014

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77 posts tagged "Celine"

Editor Obsessions: Céline’s Navy Belt Bag

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Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

Celine

I’ve never been a huge fan of yellow—and not just because it clashes with my olive skin tone—but after I saw Daria Werbowy toting the new canary Belt bag in Céline’s Fall ’14 ads, I’ve started to change my tune. The not-quite-neon color looks unexpected and chic with her big leopard coat. Even so, I could never justify paying such a high price for such a bold hue, but I was thrilled to find the same style in navy. It has everything you crave in a Céline bag—sleek silhouette, quality materials, uncompromised luxury—and I love deep blue as an alternative to black. Plus, unlike the Trapeze and Luggage bags, this one actually feels somewhat anonymous. I’d like to get my hands on one before the entire blogosphere snaps it up. I just need to save up my pennies first.

Céline Belt bag in navy blue natural calfskin, $2,950. Available at Bergdorf Goodman; call (212) 872-8757. Or visit celine.com for more information.

Photos: Courtesy Photo

UPDATED: Nadège Vanhee Rumored to Be Hermès’ Top Pick

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UPDATE: Multiple industry sources have now confirmed to Style.com that Nadège Vanhee will succeed Christophe Lemaire as the creative director of womenswear at Hermès. The house is believed to be sending out an official announcement tomorrow morning.

hermesLet the rumors begin! According to WWD, word on the street is that behind-the-scenes star Nadège Vanhee, who cut her teeth at Delvaux and Maison Martin Margiela, worked under Phoebe Philo as the design director at Céline, and is now the design director at The Row, is Hermès’ top pick to succeed Christophe Lemaire as the head of womenswear. It would be nice to see someone like Vanhee, who has a wealth of experience and an eye for clean, sophisticated luxury, get a mega-gig like the one at Hermès—goodness knows she’s paid her dues. An announcement may be made as early as this week.

When I first heard this rumor, it reminded me of Jil Sander’s choice to hire Rodolfo Paglialunga—a designer who, save a stint as the creative director at Vionnet, earned his stripes working behind the scenes at Prada for 10 years. And then there’s the case of Julie de Libran’s appointment at Sonia Rykiel. Another under-the-radar gem, de Libran designed the pre-collections for Louis Vuitton, but was, of course, not as well known as the brand’s creative director and face, Marc Jacobs. Sometimes it makes sense to have a big name head up a big house. But it’s nice to see that the work of talented, though less famous, industry vets does not go unnoticed.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/Indigitalimages.com

Where Are the Clothes Fit for a Queen?

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PrincessPrincess Letizia—i.e., Spain’s answer to Kate Middleton—is going to become queen. The news anchor-turned-royal wed Prince Felipe de Borbon ten years ago, and now that the latter’s father has abdicated the throne, she’ll be getting the crown along with her dashing prince.

The press has dubbed Princess Letizia, 41, one of “Europe’s most glamorous royals.” Sure, she’s drop-dead gorgeous, impossibly elegant, and is blessed with a winning smile, but why are these royals always so afraid to inject a little fun into their wardrobes? The soon-to-be queen seems to favor lacy frocks, mauve hues, and pantsuits, which is all good and fine, but they don’t do her justice. Somebody get this woman in some Delpozo (let’s hear it for nationalism!), Céline, or Alaïa after she takes the throne—something with a little pizzazz! Even if it’s the quiet, sophisticated kind.

And since we’re on the topic, it would be lovely if Kate Middleton could discover her sartorially adventurous side, too. Never has a vibrant Jonathan Saunders coat looked so sad as it did on Ms. Middleton in Scotland last week. Come on, ladies. We appreciate that it’s not so easy being queen, but cheer up! Or at least prescribe your closet a little Prozac.

Photos: Getty Images

Thomas Tait Is Top Dog, But Everyone’s a Winner at LVMH

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Thomas TaitThe atmosphere at the LVMH headquarters was electric this afternoon, as reporters, photographers, finalists, jury members, and designers all mingled before the big reveal of the inaugural LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers winner. London-based Canadian designer Thomas Tait, who won the Dorchester Collection Fashion Prize back in 2010, came out on top. “I was shocked,” he told us while sitting next to his gilded trophy. “I thought, Did that just happen?” Tait is now looking at 300,000 euros of financial support and a year’s worth of business mentoring and production advice, and naturally we were curious as to his next move. “A nice dinner, a good night’s sleep, and I need to call my mom and dad,” he said. But after that, he might take another step toward that handbag he’s been thinking about. Menswear, though, is “not such an emergency.”

The ten runners-up (formerly eleven, but Julien Dossena shuttered his line Atto to focus on his work at Paco Rabanne) were not forgotten—and they were awarded for their efforts. After taking the podium, LVMH’s Delphine Arnault first presented three students, Flavien Juan Nuñez, Peter Do, and Teruhiro Hasegawa, with 10,000-euro grants plus one-year internships with Dior, Céline, and Givenchy, respectively. Then, Arnault announced that the jury, which included designers Karl Lagerfeld, Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Humberto Leon, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, had decided to create a special prize of 100,000 euros each for two runners-up. Those honorees were Shayne Olivier of Hood by Air and Indian sisters Tina and Nikita Sutradhar of Miuniku. Currently based in Mumbai, the latter are moving their camp to London next year, with plans to show at London fashion week.

LVMH prize

Even those who walked away without a hefty purse were grateful. “It’s already been incredible in terms of exposure and meeting people—it’s like you win right out of the gate,” mused finalist Chris Gelinas. When asked about the final presentation, in which each designer, accompanied by two models, got ten minutes in front of the jury, he replied, “It felt a little like the Last Supper—all these important people lined up at one long table. I remember thinking, What did I just say to Karl Lagerfeld?

“I really appreciated the very different personalities and expressions. It was very interesting,” said jury member Ghesquière. “They all really have a vision, a story to tell, an expression, and a signature. That’s formidable. As for the jury, there was a real camaraderie,” he added, before slipping out of the room and back to work. Lagerfeld noted that the best part of the process was “having everyone all together, we never see each other because we’re working. But I hate that I want everybody to win and that’s not possible.”

“I am thrilled. It was so interesting and original. All eleven candidates were of such excellent quality; each had their style,” offered Arnault. “They are tomorrow’s great talents.” Asked if she thought the contest would draw even more than this year’s 1,221 candidatures, she replied, “I hope so!”

Photo: Getty Images; Tina Isaac-Goizé

Céline Looks East

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CelineFollowing in the footsteps of such luxury houses as Balenciaga, Burberry, Michael Kors, Dior Homme, and more, Céline is heading east. WWD reports today that the French house, helmed by Phoebe Philo, counts China as one of its top five most important markets, and to celebrate, will hold a runway show and exhibition in Beijing on Thursday. Céline’s popularity is just another indicator of the shift in China’s aesthetic tastes. Formerly, the luxury market there was all about status, logos, labels, and flash (i.e., if you were wearing Vuitton, you’d want everyone and their mother to know it). As the market—and its heavy-hitting consumers—evolves, subtler (but no less luxurious) brands like Balenciaga and Céline are becoming more appealing. Interesting, considering as China’s logomania dies down, the West’s obsession with label-baring wares is experiencing a major resurgence. Something for the Met to explore in its forthcoming exhibition, perhaps.