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July 30 2014

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40 posts tagged "Chanel Iman"

The Week in Look of the Day Winners Chosen by You: Americana Fashion, Fall’s Best New Sunglasses, Models-Off-Duty, and More

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Look of the dayWhat was on Style.com editors’ minds this week? After celebrating Memorial Day (along with the rest of our U.S. readers), we paid tribute to the national holiday with our Look of the Day poll on Tuesday, rounding up our favorite girls rocking American flag motifs. In the end, you voted for Kate Bosworth wearing a stars-and-stripes tank top with cutoffs at Coachella, but Rosie Huntington-Whiteley’s bikini cover-up (those stems!) was a close runner-up. Now that sunny summer days have finally arrived, we mined the recent runways for some new sunglasses inspiration. Your top pick? Tom Ford’s visor-like shades, as seen on Kati Nescher backstage at the designer’s Fall ’14 show. Keeping our eyes on the streets, Thursday’s LOTD highlighted out models-off-duty (including Joan Smalls and winner Chanel Iman) wrapping shirts and jackets around their waists. And with Resort season ramping up next week, we used the opportunity to call out some of the coolest bomber jackets spotted in the new collections.

Click here for a slideshow of the looks that won your Look of the Day votes this week—and a few runners-up for good measure.

Insta-Gratification

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. See below for today’s top shots.

Wednesday, February 5

From four eyes back to two.

Marina’s #NYFW mantra.

Ahhh! Real monsters.

It may not be Thursday, but we couldn’t resist this throwback.

Pusha T pushing tees on Marcelo Burlon. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification” »

The Modeling Moments to Remember from 2013

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Miranda KerrThere’s really never been a better time to be a model. Many will argue with me that the pinnacle of the profession was the glory days of Naomi, Christy, Linda, and Cindy. But they never had social media. In 2013, we witnessed the rise of a new class of supers who have since become household names. Cheeky Brit Cara Delevingne has amassed over 3.5 million followers on Instagram and is trailed by paparazzi everywhere she goes. Last week, Joan Smalls, Jourdan Dunn, and Chanel Iman became pop stars in their own right with the release of Beyoncé’s “Yoncé” music video, in which they dance like divas alongside Queen B. Hell, they’re even reclaiming the covers of fashion magazines.

This year, I was also thrilled to see a few of my favorite catwalk veterans make comebacks. Naomi herself had jaws on the floor when she opened and closed the Atelier Versace show—looking fiercer than ever—back in July. After a couple of years off the runways, Catherine McNeil walked in forty-two Fall shows (she’s kept the momentum going with a profusion of ad campaigns and editorials, in addition to an impressive Spring season), and Daria Werbowy had a cameo at Balenciaga. Who doesn’t love @dotwillow? As for the hottest newcomer? That prize goes to Edie Campbell, who was crowned Model of the Year earlier this month at the British Fashion Awards.

Here, a year’s worth of model high points.

Behind Beyoncé’s “Yonce”: Supermodels, Sex, and Supreme

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Beyonce
Beyonce, Jourdan Dunn, Joan Smalls, and Chanel Iman

From the time she launched her new, self-titled album at 12:01 a.m.—without any warning, press, leaks, or buildup buzz—today has been the Day of Beyoncé. The new Beyoncé features fourteen tracks and a full seventeen videos. One in particular has caught the attention of the Bey Hive: “‘Yonce,” which stars not only Bey, but also three of the fashion world’s top models—Jourdan Dunn, Joan Smalls, and Chanel Iman—in an homage of sorts to George Michael’s famous supermodel-filled “Freedom ’90″ video. Director, video artist, and co-head of creative at Supreme, Ricky Saiz, shot the video over two days in Brooklyn. “When I started to propose ideas and put together a visual narrative, Beyoncé responded really well,” he said. “She was open to me pushing a bit, and to trying new things, and I didn’t want it to be overproduced. I didn’t want a performance video, which is like jazz hands. This was more like an upskirt.”

“Upskirt” does set the racy tone. Saiz was inspired by Daido Moriyama’s erotic photographs as well as the iconic George Michael Video—and styled by Karen Langley, the cast dons an array of revealing outfits, including a black Anthony Vaccarello dress (for Dunn) and a bondage-inspired molded bodysuit from Tom Ford’s tenure at YSL (for Beyoncé).

Here, Saiz talks to Style.com about the singer’s most smoldering video to date, what it was like working with the one of the world’s biggest stars and a trio of supermodels, and that time on set when Smalls decided to lick Beyoncé’s breast.

How did you come to work with Beyoncé on this in the first place?
It was very all of a sudden, actually. I have a working relationship with Todd Tourso, her creative director. We worked together on the 2011 Lady Gaga for Supreme campaign that we put together. He called me out of the blue and said they wanted me to do a video for them. Four days later, we did it. It was very fast, all of a sudden, and fun. I think Beyoncé is an incredible artist—she has ability, reach, and doesn’t compromise. She’s always kind of done her own thing. But the project that they approached me with was very much in my lane, and my aesthetic. If they had me do a big, drawn-out, cinematic production kind of video, I probably wouldn’t have done as good of a job.

What was the brief that Beyoncé and her team gave you? What were they asking for?
They came with a pretty broad concept. They had the models in line, and wanted something pretty simple. The brief was in the direction of George Michael’s “Freedom” video. And I kind of took it from there. I felt like doing something really simple, handheld, lo-fi. It felt like an interesting way of doing it. It could come off so bland if filmed the other way. And again, I wanted to explore her transgressive imagery. Things that were sexual and erotic, but not cliché. I didn’t want to see Beyoncé with her tongue out, you know?

How is this display of sexuality different from what Miley Cyrus does in “Wrecking Ball”?
Beyoncé is so sexy without having to do anything. I felt like she didn’t need to be wet, or need to twerk. It was more about a mature sense of eroticism, like what Madonna expressed in “Human Nature” in the nineties. A lot of the inspiration came from still photography. Like Daido Moriyama’s really tight close-ups of fishnets—things that felt abstract but still resonate.

What was Beyoncé’s reaction to your creative process? Was she very hands-on?
She’s incredible. She was very hands-on, and everything was a collaborative effort. I think once she saw my aesthetic and references in the styling and art direction, she had full trust in my ideas for the video. I’ve never worked with anyone that gave so much, and was so willing to try new things. For example, the styling; Karen Langley brought this Tom Ford [for YSL] molded-breast bodysuit with the pierced nipple, fishnets, and things like that. It was exactly the references that I was looking for, but in my head I was like, Yeah, right. We’re never getting Bey to put that on. And Beyoncé’s so incredible, she was like, “Let’s do it.” I don’t think anyone’s seen her like that. She was into it.

Do you have a sense of why Beyoncé tapped Jourdan, Joan, and Chanel for this project?
They came to me with these three women in mind. It just felt very of-the-moment, very iconic. You know, they’re all supermodels, they stand on their own, they’re such powerful women. And when brought together, it created a whole dynamic. We definitely weren’t trying to put together a “girl group.” But the chemistry on set was amazing. People just came in really excited about the project, and I tried to keep things loose and fun. I wanted you to see something you maybe weren’t supposed to see.

The “Freedom” video worked because the girls were supermodelséthe first generation of so-called supers, in fact. Do you see these women as the new generation?
Absolutely. I think that in addition to being extremely beautiful, they have their own characters, and their own personalities that they brought to the table. They were anything but casted models.

Did you have any favorite moments on set?
When Joan Smalls licked Beyoncé’s boob. I’m probably not going to forget that anytime soon. To be honest, I didn’t even see it happen. I was in between monitors. I saw it in playback. My director of photography came up to me and was like, “Oh, my God, did you see that?” It was totally spontaneous. [Smalls] just went in. It was fun. We had a good time.

Calvin Klein And Drake Hip-Hop To It

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Drake

Aubrey Drake Graham may have started as a teenage actor on Degrassi: The Next Generation, but now, he’s selling out shows at Brooklyn’s Barclay’s Center—at least, he did last night with the New York segment of his “Would You Like a Tour?” tour. That’s no small feat—and Drake’s other coup was getting Calvin Klein Collection to provide his onstage wardrobe.

The musician, who turned 27 a few days ago, used yesterday’s gig to celebrate his birthday with a crowd that included several Brooklyn Nets, Victor Cruz, and guest performers Busta Rhymes and A$AP Rocky (along with GF Chanel Iman). Also celebrating was Calvin Klein men’s creative director Italo Zucchelli, who met Drake for the first time at the house’s fashion week party in September. Although he’s worked with countless celebrities, this is Zucchelli’s first time designing a tour wardrobe. “I’m a music obsessive,” he said. “Working on this, I felt very in my element.” Drake wore two of the custom looks last night: a light blue denim hooded shirt, tank top, and multi-pocket cargo pant, and later, a reflective tank top and track pant as he serenaded the crowd on a round, elevated catwalk. Unlike some other rappers, Drake completed his show without a single wardrobe malfunction.

Photo: Courtesy of Calvin Klein, Inc.