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April 20 2014

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33 posts tagged "Charlotte Dellal"

Diving Into The Fashion World, Feet First

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Let’s be real here. Fashion is a hypercompetitive industry full of people who can be witheringly (but often hilariously) critical of each other. So when it comes time for an awards gala, wherein the members of the fashion scene must play nice and hand out plaudits to their peers, most people cope by sighing into their free Champagne and mumbling that so-and-so was sorely overlooked…as usual. But every so often, an award is given out to a designer who is so self-evidently deserving that only the most vicious fashion misanthrope could protest. Such was the case recently at the Footwear News FN Awards, where Charlotte Dellal took home the Designer of the Year honor for her rapidly expanding five-year-old brand, Charlotte Olympia. This has been a threshold year for Dellal, one that saw her launch a range of bridal footwear, collaborate with Victoria Beckham, and open her first stateside store on New York’s Upper East Side. More generally, 2012 was the year that Charlotte Olympia firmly and finally established itself as a go-to brand for VIPs looking to rock a glam shoe on the red carpet. (Or anywhere else, for that matter.) Here, the cool and impeccably coiffed Dellal talks to Style.com about gilded platforms, her brand’s evolution, and the importance of having a sense of humor.


Congratulations! I guess this is as good a time as any to ask you that burning fashion question: What is the deal with women and shoes?
You mean, why do women love shoes? I always have a hard time with that one. They just do. I think, maybe, it has something to do with the fact that they’re objects—beautiful objects that you can wear. They look good on, and they look good off.

Did you always know you wanted to design shoes?
Actually, I wanted to do fashion design. Or so I thought. But when I did my foundation course, my tutor suggested I go into Cordwainers and train to make shoes. All my sketches of clothes were heavily accessorized. So I was accessory-focused from the beginning, I guess. And I do love accessories. I love how they personalize a look—you can be wearing the most sober outfit, and add an amazing shoe, a crazy bag, a hat, whatever, and make it something else entirely. It’s that old Hollywood, 1940s thing that I love so much; a way of not just finishing a look, but really elaborating it with your own sense of style.

You have a very distinctive, ’40s Hollywood-inflected personal style, and that’s reflected in Charlotte Olympia. When you design, are you designing for yourself?
Yes and no. I mean, as a designer, you create things that you love, don’t you? And as a female designer, it’s pretty inevitable that you create things that you love and want to wear. They go hand in hand. For me, anyway. So, of course, my sensibility is in the brand; it wouldn’t work otherwise. But my experiences as a woman also inform my sense of what’s missing in the market. Launching bridal—that came pretty directly out of my own experience of being a bride. I was looking around at the shoe options, and it was all, various shades of white and off-white. Like, peep-toe heels and things. And of course, I love color, I love pattern, and I just felt like, well, on your wedding of all days, you should be wearing a pair of shoes you really love, that represent who you are. I had on a huge dress, no one was going to see my shoes, but it made me happy knowing that I had on a pair of leopard-print pumps. And then, in the meantime, I did have women coming to the shop, and buying, like, red shoes to wear at their weddings. So I saw this niche.

How do you see your line as having evolved since you launched five years ago?
Well, this is obvious, but it’s gotten a lot bigger. My first few collections, I was only doing 140mm heels, with the recessed platform. That was about establishing an aesthetic, by the way; it wasn’t that I thought all women should wear super-high heels all the time. But I wanted to establish a silhouette, and a certain…I guess the only way to say it is a certain glamour. You know, as an aside, my true signature, initially, was the recessed gold platform. Some people saw that as really bling-y, but my thinking was, you know, it’s a recessed platform; when you wear the shoe, it’s under your foot, and so all that is is a little golden glow underfoot. A little magic, because—why not? Anyway. Sorry to digress, I just always felt like that gold platform was misunderstood. And of course now I design all sort of shoes—flats, sandals, the whole lot. Plus bags, now, too.

Are there other categories you’d like to explore?
There are lots of things I’d love to do, eventually. Like hats—I’m a big fan of hats, and I’ve been working with Piers Atkinson on some styles. I don’t need to do hats in-house; not right now. There are a lot of milliners I respect. Down the line, who knows? But anything that develops, it will develop organically. I like to joke that my accessories have accessories. Like, the bags started because I wanted a Perspex clutch to match the Perspex heels in a collection. And here we are, doing all these bags. And I love it. The novelty bags we make each season, they’re like the exclamation point at the end of the collection.

Do you have any shoe heroes?
Salvatore Ferragamo. The old Salvatore Ferragamo—the man. He used all this wonderful color and amazing materials. And of course, he was from the era that I love and made special shoes for the Hollywood actresses that have inspired me. And then, of course, when I was a child, my mother’s closet was full of Manolos. And when you’re a child, you’re always in your mother’s closet, trying on her shoes. Again, so many wonderful colors. And such a distinctive femininity—I still really appreciate that.

People tend to talk about your shoes being glamorous. It’s a word you use quite a bit yourself. But I feel like they rarely point out that your shoes are also kind of…funny. You know they’re funny, right?
Of course! I like to bring a sense of humor to my designs. A little silliness.What I really love to do is to play with the obvious—my collections are usually inspired by places, and I love doing things like, when we did the Paris collection, playing on all these Parisian super-clichés, like frou-fy poodles and the Eiffel Tower. I like to make the obvious more obvious. But it’s like I was saying, about the gold platform—why not? It’s so much easier to be bold or silly or over-the-top with your shoes than with pretty much any other part of your wardrobe. I can easily understand women who are shy about wearing some kind of crazy dress. But having fun with shoes? That never hurt anyone.

Photo: Julia Kennedy

Footwear News’ Lifetime Achiever Has The Kate Middleton Vote Locked Up

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According to Stuart Weitzman, earning a lifetime achievement award could be considered a nudge toward an exodus from the industry. “Twenty-six years ago they gave me my first award, which was Man of the Year,” recalled the designer who took home the Lifetime Achievement Award at last night’s 26th Annual Footwear News Achievement Awards held at the Museum of Modern Art. “Now I think they’re trying to retire me.” Despite his jests, the 71-year-old designer (above) shows no signs of slowing down. Selling two million pairs of shoes each year, Weitzman continues to outfit well-heeled women across the globe in his signature 50/50 boots and demure heels. He counts Angelina Jolie, Beyoncé (who even sent in a congratulatory video tribute for Weitzman), and Kate Middleton as fans. Most recently, the latter turned up at London’s Olympic Games in his Corkswoon wedge, turning the stacked style into an instant hit. “She didn’t change her shoes for nine days,” he said. “It was a big deal.”


Among the flurry of footwear fanatics on hand were Miranda Kerr, Tali Lennox, and pop star-turned-designer Fergie, who paired a turquoise Pucci dress with her own Holly pumps. “I love a platform because my husband is so much taller than I am,” the singer admitted. “He’s always leaning over to kiss me.” Even presenter Victor Cruz revealed he’s a “heels guy” and prefers his lady friends in Christian Louboutin or Charlotte Olympia. “I know my stuff,” beamed the New York Giants’ wide receiver. Among the winners of the evening, Charlotte Dellal and Tabitha Simmons (left, with Kerr) took home trophies for Designer of the Year and Style Influencer of the Year respectively, while Rebecca Minkoff earned praise for using Instagram photos in her first print ad campaign (which debuted, by the way, in Style.com/Print). “It was another way that we could connect to our customer and make her feel empowered,” explained Minkoff who, hours earlier, uploaded sandal options for the evening and let her 114k followers decide. No stranger to posting sartorial selfies, Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine lamented over the cons of public forum sharing. “Shoe porn instigates the most heated conversations,” the blogger told Style.com. “The reactions are funny. Amid all the ‘OMG, I love your shoes!’ There’s always the ‘Girl, shave your legs! Why aren’t your toes pedicured!’ It can get pretty hostile.”

A Shoe-In: Charlotte Olympia X Agent Provocateur

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Agent Provocateur seems to have found its go-to girl in Charlotte Dellal. Just last year, the shoe designer lent her fashionable hand to the luxury lingerie label’s ad campaign, starring Josephine de la Baume, and now she’s done a sexy Charlotte Olympia shoe collaboration for AP’s premium Soiree line. Two styles of sky-high heels (pictured), the Candice, a modern take on a classic boudoir slipper, and the Bellatrix, a black patent leather stiletto with zipper detail, will make their debut tonight at Seven Bar Foundation’s Lingerie London Fashion Show and Gala. But those who are itching to get their hands on a pair right away are in luck. Both variations ($1,190) are available on Net-a-porter.com starting today.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

A Clear Forecast For Fall Accessories

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With the exception of Cinderella, Lucite and Perspex shoes used to be associated with exotic dancers. But in the past few seasons, clear accessories have lost their lowbrow associations. During NYFW, we noticed oversize vinyl clutches at 3.1 Phillip Lim and were transfixed by Rodarte‘s footwear with sand art stripes decorating the Plexiglas platforms. Karl Lagerfeld, too, is lately making a case for the transparent trend. At the Chanel Cruise presentation earlier this week in Versailles, he styled his models with plastic cross-body bags and matching cuff bracelets, while on the Chanel Fall runway, every look came paired with geode-inspired d’Orsay pumps featuring see-through cylinder heels. And PVC isn’t just for the runways. Charlotte Dellal is frequently spotted carrying one of her crystalline clutches, and during the shows, Tommy Ton snapped Shala Monroque dodging the rain in an embellished Prada bucket hat from Spring 2010.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW.

Photo: Courtesy of Chanel

Charlotte Olympia’s Miami Vice

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“Even if you have the most sober outfit, an amazing pair of shoes and accessories will really perk things up,” Charlotte Dellal tells Style.com at the British Institute of Architects, where she presented her Spring ’12 Charlotte Olympia collection. The Miami Art Deco setting provided a perfect background for the collection as models traipsed around wearing shoes embellished with shells, pearls, and appliquéd leaves.

But it wasn’t just the shoes the crowd, which included Natalie Massenet, Anna Dello Russo, and model Portia Freeman (the face of the campaign), was fixated on—it was the clothes, too. Trying to identify the designer, they suggested they might be Issa or Temperley, but in fact, the dresses and swimsuits were by Charlotte herself. “I knew what I wanted to go with the shoes, so I thought I would just do the clothes myself and got a seamstress to help me realize my vision,” she said of her first foray into designing womenswear. “I hope it works.”

On top of finishing the shoe and clothing collection, she had a baby just a few weeks ago. Few would have guessed it. Dellal, with a nipped-in waist and no bags under her eyes, let us in on the secret: “I can’t take the credit—it’s shapewear and a maternity nurse.”

Photo: Jorge Herrera / Getty Images