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August 28 2014

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41 posts tagged "Charlotte Olympia"

Charlotte Goes to Hollywood

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Charlotte Olympia's L.A. StoreCharlotte Olympia is in expansion mode. Best known for its kitten flats, kitschy clutches, and sky-high platform pumps, the London-based label has opened a new store in Beverly Hills. “L.A. has always evoked Old Hollywood glamour,” says the brand’s founder and designer, Charlotte Dellal—who, it should be noted, is the picture of a vintage Tinseltown pinup. “It’s an era that continues to inspire me and reflects the essence of Charlotte Olympia.” Together with the opening, the designer is launching her cinematic Pre-Fall ’13 Hollywoodland collection (below), which celebrates iconic landmarks (there’s a Walk of Fame clutch, $995) and silver-screen goddesses from a bygone era (Mae West got a pair of heels named after her, $1,125).
 Continue Reading “Charlotte Goes to Hollywood” »

Bubbly Love

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Charlotte Olympia x Veuve Clicquot's Love Bubbly

On Saturday, the jet set will descend on the Hamptons to watch Veuve Clicquot’s annual Polo Classic, where ponies, bubbles, and pastels will undoubtedly abound. To commemorate the summer event, Charlotte Olympia’s Charlotte Dellal has teamed up with Veuve to create a champers-themed capsule. Aptly named Lovely Bubbly, the range, which will be available at the designer’s New York store and online this July, comprises such clever, booze-inspired wares as a gilded, bubble-embellished Lucite clutch, black satin sandals garnished with a Champagne flute, a “Cheers” bag, and a pair of the designer’s signature Dolly pumps that are made out of—what else?—gold-speckled cork. “I always enjoy designing with cork,” said Dellal, who offered that her favorite way to drink Champagne is in a large glass over ice, or á la piscine. “It has a natural beauty and functionality.” We do, however, suggest sipping in moderation while donning Dellal’s sky-high platforms—overindulging will likely result in a literal bottoms- (or, rather, soles-) up situation. Ranging from $595 to $995, the collection debuts above, exclusively on Style.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Charlotte Olympia

We Predict A Riot: Charlotte Olympia x Tom Binns

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In the event that you didn’t get your “punk” fill during the Fall ’13 collections, Charlotte Dellal has got you covered. Just in time for the Met Ball, the Charlotte Olympia designer reveals her collaboration with jeweler Tom Binns. Featuring house signatures updated with Binns staples like safety pins and neon, the riotous capsule is badass but infused with a bit of cheeky banter.

“Dolly Riot gives you no excuse not to go out and party the night away!” said Dellal, referring to her recessed-platform best seller, which the designers have studded entirely in pins. Fans of her Kitty flats can embrace the anarchy, too—Binns gave the embroidered cat motifs a very smart-alecky set of nose and ear piercings.

“His designs are so distinctive. And I love the way he combines elegance with an anti-conformist sentiment,” said Dellal of Binns’ work. “I am also a big believer of his phrase ‘More is more!’”

Charlotte Olympia x Tom Binns will be available, from May 2, exclusively at Charlotte Olympia’s Mayfair and Manhattan stores, www.charlotteolympia.com, Jeffrey New York, and Moda Operandi. Prices range from $795 to $1,695.

Photo: Courtesy of Charlotte Olympia

The Must-Have Accessories of Fall 2013, According to the Editors

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Each season, Style.com’s market director, Marina Larroudé, combs through every collection to find the most covetable accoutrements. In our Fall 2013 Accessories Index, she highlights the best and biggest trends—from funny furs and demure pearls to spikes, studs, and combat boots. We couldn’t help but pick our own favorites, so below, the Style.com editors reveal what we’ll be craving come fall.

“It’s a long process to work on the Accessories Index. We feature almost 200 brands and around 5,000 images. Every season, I like to discover new brands to add to our list. It’s unfair to ask me for a favorite accessory, but I would be happy to have Rochas’ earrings, any Prada shoe, or any Victoria Beckham day bag.” —Marina Larroudé, market director

“I love the schoolmarm-meets-sexpot look of this Narciso Rodriguez pump.” —Nicole Phelps, executive editor

“In my imagination, I’m that chic kind of girl who cabs to and from appointments in a pair of single-sole Manolos. In reality, I’m subway-ing everywhere and need shoes I can really stomp around in. These lug-soled Stella McCartney beauties are the footwear equivalent of all-terrain vehicles, placing them at the top of my must-have list for fall.” —Brittany Adams, associate fashion editor Continue Reading “The Must-Have Accessories of Fall 2013, According to the Editors” »

FIT’s Foot Fetish

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What is it about women and shoes? According to Dr. Valerie Steele, the director and chief curator of The Museum at FIT and the author of Shoes: A Lexicon of Style (among many other fashion books), the fixation dates back to Cinderella and her glass slippers. But that doesn’t necessarily explain women’s willingness to defy death, gravity, and blisters with the super-stacked platforms and needle-thin spikes of modern day. Shoe Obsession, The Museum at FIT’s upcoming exhibition (which, running from February 8 through April 13, was curated by Dr. Steele, Colleen Hill, and Fred Dennis), explores the female shoe fetish via some of the most iconic, outrageous, and exceptional styles that have come out this century.

Including shoes from established houses (Christian Louboutin’s Pigalle stilettos, Roger Vivier’s feather Eyelash pumps, Prada’s flame shoes, and Chanel’s gun heels), up-and-coming talents (Nicholas Kirkwood’s graffitied Keith Haring platforms, Charlotte Olympia’s Kiss Me Dolores pumps), and experimental designers (Masaya Kushino’s sculptural human hair, Cyprus wood, and lace platforms; Noritaka Tatehana’s eighteen-inch ballerina shoes), Shoe Obsession presents every type of high heel you can imagine—and several that you can’t. Here, Dr. Steele talks to Style.com about the fascination with extravagant shoes, the evolution of contemporary footwear, and the upcoming exhibition.

Let’s cut to the chase. Why are so many women obsessed with shoes?

Well, I think there are a couple of layers. First off, shoes are an intimate extension of the physical body. And they seem to say a lot about our personality, our sexual attitudes, and our social status. And high heels in particular seem to be the focus of a lot of our thoughts about gender, sexuality, eroticism, and femininity. I think there’s definitely an element of sexual fetishism involved in men’s fascination with women’s high-heel shoes. But for women, I think it’s not fetishism so much as it is an obsession with fashion and with shoes as the ultimate sartorial symbol of erotic femininity.

Have women always been obsessed with shoes, or was there a point in fashion history when the infatuation really took off?

It goes way back to Cinderella. Shoes have played an important role in cultural thought for a long time. In Qui êtes-vous, Polly Maggoo?, a film from the sixties about French fashion, there’s a wonderful scene when a TV reporter is interviewing some pompous French sociology professor who says that the Cinderella story is all about the importance of tiny feet and beautiful shoes. Then he says, “So there you are: fetishism, mutilation, pain. Fashion in a nutshell.” [Laughs] But I do think that our show is unique, because we’re not just looking at the social and psychosexual reasons why we all love shoes. We’re focusing on the twenty-first century and calling attention to the fact that in the last twelve years or so, after the end of Sex and the City, the obsession with high-end designer shoes has spread from something that only a few people were really obsessed with to being something that everybody’s obsessed with.

Why have heels risen to such hilariously high heights in the past few decades? And what dictates heel height?

I think the key element there is the acceptance of hypersexual shoe design as part of fashion, as opposed to just a corner of the pornographic industry. Before he died, Helmut Newton said in an interview that in the seventies, you had to go to fetish and porn stores to get the kind of shoes he wanted for his fashion photographs. But by the early nineties, he could go to any high fashion designer—Chanel, Dior, they were all doing fetish-y shoes. So that’s one thing, which I think is crucial to the recent growth of heels. Another is the popularity of platforms on shoes. If you’ve got a two-inch platform, automatically your heel can go from three to five inches, or from four to six, or whatever you want.

What makes women willing to shell out so much money for a pair of shoes that they may or may not be able to walk in?

Part of it is that shoe shopping is probably the highest form of fashion shopping. It’s the most pleasurable. I mean, who doesn’t look good in a pair of beautiful shoes? And compare it with something like bathing-suit shopping, which is the nadir of horror. Also, you can get a lot more fashion bang for your buck with a pair of shoes. You know, it might be a thousand dollars, but if you’re going to buy a jacket or a dress by that same or a comparable designer, you’d be talking three, four thousand dollars or up. And right now, people are, in a way, dressing in more of a uniform. For instance, many people just wear a well-cut pair of jeans and a great black jacket. But with shoes, they can play and transform themselves—they can change the style image that they’re creating. Continue Reading “FIT’s Foot Fetish” »