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April 24 2014

styledotcom .@marinalarroude rounds up the best black & gold finds from Saint Laurent, Marc Jacobs & more: stylem.ag/1jBvRO9 pic.twitter.com/FjB5WLZ2nI

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56 posts tagged "Chloe"

Guillaume Henry Takes Carven ‘Round The World

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Guillaume Henry“It’s been sort of like a Carven World Tour these days,” laughed Carven‘s creative director, Guillaume Henry, while sitting in the lobby of the Mercer hotel. His description wasn’t hyperbolic in the least. In the last month, Carven has opened two boutiques in Shanghai, its first flagship in London, and now the house is preparing to debut a stateside outpost, in New York. Located at 83 Mercer Street, in Soho (with stores like Chloé, Saint Laurent, and Proenza Schouler just around the corner), the 1,636-square-foot space was designed in collaboration with architect Eric Chevallier. “I didn’t want it to be too impressive, though,” explained Henry. “I prefer places that feel comfortable, familiar, and approachable.” He plans to achieve said ambience by combining luxurious elements—like a black leather bench and marble details—with more industrial ones. “I love the idea of mixing opposites—day and night, sophisticated and casual, sexy and shy. I love two extreme worlds connected.”

The New York flagship will mark Carven’s sixteenth freestanding boutique (though the designer hints that a third Paris shop, outside the Marais, as well as another location in Manhattan, could be on the way). Carven’s investment in new international digs is a testament to Henry’s success at the brand, which, founded in 1943 by a now 104-year-old Carmen de Tommaso, was revived in 2009. Throughout the past five years, Henry has brought the sleeping heritage house back to life with his crisp, clean sense of modernity and his youthful approach to design. Last night, Henry sat down with Style.com (next to a newlywed couple in a bridal gown and a morning suit, oddly enough) to talk Carven’s history, imagined muses, and why real life is the most incredible inspiration.

You’ve been at Carven for five years. What have you learned?
I’m learning new things every single day. It’s completely crazy. We started with a white page, and now the book is starting to fill up. What I love about Carven is, it’s about pleasure, and a challenge, but at the same time the clothes talk to real people. Carven is part dream, part reality. We do a catwalk each season, and we tell the story of a woman, or a man. But then when the show is finished, they’re not my clothes anymore. They’re everyone’s clothes. And I love that they’re going to tell their own story. People are going to bring our clothes into their daily lives, and that’s something I adore.

What does it take to successfully revive a heritage house? Many have tried and failed, but you seem to have a pretty good grip on it.
I’ve been lucky. Carven is an old brand, but I’ve been there for the rebirth. You know, what Mme Carven [Carmen de Tommaso] did in the fifties was good in the fifties, but you have to think about why the brand worked back then. It worked because it was connected to its client. And Mme Carven was dressing cool young girls at that time, so our goal was to dress cool young people. Young is not only a question of age for me—it’s a question of attitude. It’s a question of having a fresh mind.

Do you ever feel beholden to Carven’s history, or to what Carmen de Tommaso would want?
Not really. It’s a very approachable company, and a very approachable brand. Mrs. Carven was a grand couturier, as we call them, but she didn’t reinvent concepts. She was a designer, for sure, but she was really making clothes, and I do believe in that. I’ve met her a few times, and she’s 104 years old, but she’s super young! I think when she decided to sell the brand, she took a stance and separated herself from it. But I always ask myself if she would understand what I’m designing. I’m sure she wouldn’t have done the same things—but would she respect the DNA of the brand? That’s the main thing for me.

What has been your biggest challenge at Carven thus far?
Getting Carven on Mercer Street. Five years ago, when I’d call retailers and say, “OK, we are Carven,” they would hang up the phone. And now, we’re on Mercer Street, which is like, “OK, we did it!” It’s been a fantastic challenge for us, because it was a dream. It wasn’t a question of success or anything like that. I have no idea what success means. Especially in this industry—you never know. But Carven, for me, is fresh. And for people, it’s a new brand. It’s an international brand. It’s not a question of history anymore. And that’s very satisfying. Continue Reading “Guillaume Henry Takes Carven ‘Round The World” »

Designer Diary: Clare Waight Keller’s Postcard From L.A.

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Last week, Chloé designer Clare Waight Keller and her family flew from Paris to Los Angeles—partially for work, but also for pleasure. Here, she shares her snapshots of surfers, palm tree forests, and vintage vans exclusively with Style.com.

Coachella Valley Preserve

Surrounded by a forest of palms in the Coachella Valley Preserve, where the palm trees reach seven stories high. They are the most incredible sight and grow around an oasis, which is so peaceful and otherworldly you can’t believe it is only two hours from L.A.

Temperature in California

The amazing temperature in California. I love it!

Hiking

On my day off before heading to L.A., I hiked on the top of the San Jacinto Mountains in Palm Desert. It’s one of the highest peaks in California at 8,250 feet, with a vertical climb to 10,500 feet. It is absolutely stunning. There’s incredibly fresh air and the smell of pine trees and amazing views. You go from desert cactus at the bottom of the mountain to snow at the top!

Surfers at Santa Monica Beach

Surfers early on Sunday morning. I always head down to Santa Monica Beach to see them out on the waves. Continue Reading “Designer Diary: Clare Waight Keller’s Postcard From L.A.” »

Shop The Look: All-American Girl

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Shop the Look

We love a fresh trend, but as soon as the leaves start to turn, we’re instantly inspired to wear our classic fall staples. Think cozy cable knits, boyish plaids, riding boots, peacoats, and rich autumnal colors. It all feels just right for a rustic cabin weekend, complete with apple picking and cocoa sipping. But even if that all-American getaway isn’t on your calendar, a traditional fall wardrobe (with a few updates, of course) is still the perfect way to get into the spirit of the season. Shop our favorite preppy classics from Marc Jacobs, Gucci, J.Crew, and more, below.

1. Marc Jacobs cable-knit wool sweater, $695, available at netaporter.com

2. J.Crew wool plaid scarf, $59.50, available at jcrew.com

3. Gucci leather-trimmed cotton-blend riding pants, $895, available at netaporter.com

4. Marni leather knee boots, $1,240, available at netaporter.com

5. Chloé Marcie mini leather shoulder bag, $775, available at netaporter.com

ChloĆ©’s Got That London Attitude

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Pixie Geldof and Clare Waight KellerConsidering the British imprint on the French house, it makes perfect sense that Chloé launched its sixty-year retrospective book, Chloé Attitudes, in London. “Chloé’s had this great succession of cool, young British designers,” Sarah Mower said at last night’s party at the new Serpentine Sackler Gallery. “They are not pretentious and they don’t talk about great lofty inspirations and references. They just talk about what we want, what girls want to wear. That’s really Chloé.”

Succinct, given Mower was tasked with writing the text for the tome. The fete drew such guests as Eliza Doolittle, Damien Hirst, Pixie Geldof (armed with her own Chloé bag), and the label’s creative director, Clare Waight Keller.

“Chloé has always stood for beautiful femininity,” said Waight Keller, who often turns to the house’s archives for inspiration. “But it’s been interesting to realize there has been surrealism, graphicness…there are other facets to the Chloé girl that aren’t always so evident.”

Published by Rizzoli, with art direction by industry legend Marc Ascoli, Chloé Attitudes delves deep into the house’s history. As Mower described it, “It’s a detective story, because there was no real archive for years.” Dating from its founding in 1952, the book draws on Chloé’s rich collaborations with groundbreaking photographers like Helmut Newton, Guy Bourdin, and Patrick Demarchelier.

Ascoli and Mower spoke of finding the common denominator through designers such as Karl Lagerfeld, Stella McCartney, and Phoebe Philo. Waight Keller said it’s simply “an attitude,” but Mower went further: “It’s really an optimistic spirit. It has always been about capturing the spirit of the times, how girls have changed with the times, and what they want at the moment. There’s a feminist thread throughout.” Judging by the evening’s crowd, dressed in Chloé’s greatest hits, the house is still hitting the nail on the head. Of the girls, by the girls, and for the girls—that’s fashion democracy in action.

Photo: Getty Images

Vince Goes Big In Soho

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Vince's New Mercer Street Store

Is it just us, or has Vince—the contemporary range known for its bunny-soft cashmere wares—worked up some serious mojo? The beloved basics brand began to gain steam in January, when it appointed Doo-Ri Chung as its creative director. In May, the label hired Karin Gregersen, formerly of Chloé, to direct the label’s sales, marketing, product development, and creative initiatives as its new president. And now, it seems things are in full swing. Just last night, Vince hosted the launch of its new 3,000-square-foot flagship on Mercer Street, and the fete attracted all the right girls-about-town. Alexandra Richards, Harley Viera Newton, and Leigh Lezark turned up to check out the space and dance to tunes from the Dolls’ deejay Mia Moretti and violinist Margot.

With its exposed white brick, 22-foot-high ceilings, skylight, and pale hardwood floors, the boutique boasts a welcoming layout. “It’s very modern and very clean, but it’s also warm, comfortable, and inviting,” said Vince CEO Jill Granoff. For the first time, Vince’s men’s and women’s collections are presented on separate sprawling floors, but it was the shoe display case—which was filled with enticing pointed, pony-hair mules, riding boots, and high-tops—that seemed to get the most attention. The kicks will have to move over soon, though: Gregersen told Style.com that the label will be launching handbags next year. “We’re building more of a global lifestyle brand,” said Gregersen. “We’re continuing to work on our existing products and launching new extensions.” Granoff chimed in to note that dresses and outerwear for all occasions are a new focus, and that they’re working to further develop the menswear offering.

Indeed, the slick Soho flagship makes a smart addition to the label’s three other Manhattan (and twenty U.S.) outposts. But more retail spaces are nigh—Vince is looking to take the international market by storm and is opening its first stand-alone store in Tokyo next week.

Vince’s flagship is located at 89 Mercer Street in New York.

Photo: Courtesy of Vince