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April 20 2014

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46 posts tagged "Christian Lacroix"

Faux and Fabulous

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jewelry prize

If you’ve ever fallen hard for a piece of high-fashion costume jewelry, chances are good that it has passed through Edgard Hamon. Founded in 1919, the atelier was the first to create belts for Chanel, and decades later, it was the first to thread strips of leather through metal chains.

Today, the Edgard Hamon archives scan like a who’s who of couture’s glory days: Yves Saint Laurent, Lanvin, Nina Ricci, Chanel, Givenchy, Thierry Mugler, Balenciaga, and Christian Lacroix have all called on Edgard Hamon at some point.

Which is why Lacroix, along with Elie Top, Paris Vogue jewelry editor Franceline Prat, and various other experts all gathered today at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Their mission was to elect the winners of the two first-ever Edgard Hamon awards: the Edgard Hamon Prize for Costume Jewellery, which goes to a designer under 30 years old who has worked in fashion jewelry in France, and the 3,000-euro Edgard Hamon Future Hope Prize for Costume Jewellery, which goes to a student in his or her last year at a European school of fashion.

The contestants were challenged to design pieces based on the work of a chosen architect, and tonight, Style.com can exclusively reveal the winners. Century Xie took the 15,000-euro Edgard Hamon Prize for Costume Jewellery, and Yao Yu won the Edgard Hamon Future Hope Prize for Costume Jewellery.

“We had a great time, they were incredibly creative,” said Lacroix of the selection process. “It was really beautiful. Many of them referenced Gaudí or Prouvé, for example. And many of them were influenced by Elie [Top].”

Top, the self-taught talent behind Lanvin’s fabulous baubles, replied that he was flattered to hear it. “Everyone’s always talking about bags and shoes, but costume jewelry really deserves attention. It’s so closely linked with fashion’s silhouettes, color, and what you want now—that’s the magic of it. There’s so much more to it than silver and gold.”

Xie’s line will be produced and displayed at Le Bon Marché; Edgard Hamon will produce three of Yu’s prototypes and she will receive an internship. The winners’ collections will be presented at an official ceremony at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs on July 4.

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

Maison Michel’s Head Space

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Maison Michel's Paris Pop Up

One of fashion’s most beloved milliners, Maison Michel, whose black felt Virginie fedora is a perennial favorite, finally has a place to, well, hang its hats. Founded in 1936, Maison Michel catered to houses like Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin, and Christian Lacroix before permanently joining the Chanel galaxy sixty years later. Thanks to the ministrations of Laetitia Crahay, the house now channels Parisian chic through all manner of headgear, from headbands with veils and sassy little rabbit ears to paint-splattered straw boaters and one-off exclusives in croc or full-on feathers. These are now artfully arranged in an intimate and colorful pop-up “apartment” that quietly opened last month just down the street from the mother ship on the Rue Cambon. Here, Maison Michel is also offering a demi-mesure service for customized pieces, and already its success has been such that the closing date, originally set for March, has been pushed back until late June. More permanent digs are said to be in the works for later this year.

Maison Michel, 19 Rue Cambon, 75001 Paris. www.michel-paris.com

Photo: Courtesy of Maison Michel

Tilda Swinton: Fashion’s Muse for Eternity

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Tilda Swinton

Olivier Saillard—author, poet, star fashion curator—tends to prefer a contemplative moment over a grand event. He is also fond of saying that, had he ever studied fashion design, he would have done “just one dress” and then retired his tape measure.

Last night in Paris, he offered both. Eternity Dress, a fifty-one-minute performance starring Tilda Swinton, sponsored by Chloé, and staged at the École des Beaux-Arts this week as part of the city’s fall festival, has been sold out for months. In it, Saillard and Swinton explore the art of dressmaking, starting with lines and measurements (waist: 28 inches, and so forth) working up through flat patterns and the beginnings of a dress, which Swinton took a moment to sew on herself. As the dress took form, Swinton recited a litany of collar styles in French and released a world of emotion in the turn of a sleeve, finally draping herself in rich-hued chiffon and velvet unfurled from bolts lined up on the floor.

Ultimately, The Dress—a black sheath with long sleeves and an open back—was a stand-in for a century of fashion history, from Paul Poiret to Comme des Garçons. One of the show’s high points, as well as its biggest laugh, showed Swinton striking a series of emblematic poses for houses from Poiret to Yohji Yamamoto, by way of Chanel, Dior, Mugler, YSL, and Jean Paul Gaultier. Among a roomful of designers including Gaultier, Christian Lacroix, Bouchra Jarrar, Martine Sitbon, and Clare Waight Keller, Haider Ackermann was first on his feet for the ovation. “It’s absolutely a piece of my life,” said Waight Keller. “They’ve taken everyday materials like tape and chalk and elevated them to an art form about designing a dress from scratch. It’s about craft, measuring, and a considered approach. It’s poetry.”

Tilda Swinton

“One of the things about Tilda is that she can do anything,” noted Saillard after the performance. “She’s not a ‘fashion girl,’ so she can be a sculpture, an actress, a woman, a man, she can be 18 or 75 years old. It was like we were in a bubble, and the experience gave us lots of new ideas. Fashion has to be surprising.”

At the small cocktail party held afterward at Lapérouse, Swinton added, “Olivier is a playmate. We work and play together and come up with crackers ideas for some other time—it’s wonderful to be able to play off of someone like that.” Asked whether she realizes that she would be any designer’s dream to work with, Swinton let loose a small bombshell: “Maybe it’s because I know nothing about fashion!”

Photos: Vincent Lappartient

The Past Is Back

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Jean PatouSchiaparelli isn’t the only iconic house that’s getting a reboot. WWD reports that French brand Jean Patou—which was founded by its namesake designer in the twenties, and helmed by the likes of Jean Paul Gaultier, Karl Lagerfeld, and Christian Lacroix after Patou’s death—is going to return to the fashion scene. Both a couturier and sportswear trailblazer, Patou, like Schiaparelli, had a way with tenniswear and smart knits—he was even credited with popularizing the cardigan. “We already have plans, we have ideas and know what sort of fashion we would like to do—and even consulted designers, who are all excited, because no matter what school they’ve done, for them Patou is an enormous reference,” the label’s vice president, Bruno Cottard, told the paper. Having ceased to produce couture in 1987 after Lacroix left the house to work on his own label, the brand has lived on through fragrances for the last two and a half decades. Cottard suggested that the house could make its Paris fashion week comeback as soon as a year from now.

Photo: George Hoyningen-Huene

Louise Leconte Gets the Gaga Bump

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Louise Leconte's dress worn by Lady Gaga

With her ArtPop album set to debut in November (and a new song that allegedly leaked today), Lady Gaga has ended her uncharacteristic under-the-radar spell—she’s been recovering from hip surgery since February—reemerging on the scene with a look that’s pared down but no less bold. Earlier this month, she attended artist Robert Wilson’s Watermill Benefit in the Hamptons (where she announced an upcoming project with Wilson and Marina Abramovic), donning a vampy black gown that curved in at the chest to reveal a black lace brassiere. The ensemble, we learned, wasn’t designed by any of Gaga’s favorite haute powerhouses—rather, it was the work of 26-year-old up-and-comer Louise Leconte. “Her stylist wrote me and asked for six or seven looks from my graduation collection, so of course I sent them,” the French-born, Brussels-based designer told Style.com. Continue Reading “Louise Leconte Gets the Gaga Bump” »