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69 posts tagged "Christian Louboutin"

Karl Lagerfeld, Cindy Sherman, and More Collaborate With Louis Vuitton

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Karl raf

An LV punching bag by Karl Lagerfeld? Why not! Today, WWD reports that Nicolas Ghesquière and Delphine Arnault are launching a new project, The Icon and the Iconoclasts, in which six heavy-hitting creatives will put their own spin on monogrammed bags and luggage. The designers, artists, and architects include Lagerfeld (who is, in fact, producing a punching bag), Cindy Sherman, Rei Kawakubo, Christian Louboutin, Frank Gehry, and Marc Newson.

The project instantly calls to mind the collaborations Marc Jacobs championed during his tenure at Vuitton: Stephen Sprouse, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Yayoi Kusama all interpreted the LV monogram in a unique way. But Ghesquière’s take brings Vuitton’s team-ups to a whole new level.

Images won’t be revealed until later this fall and prices will range between $2,725 and $5,450. That’s a pretty penny, but considering the bags will be available only for a few months, we’re thinking they qualify as the ultimate splurge.

Photo: Getty Images 

Christian Louboutin Walks on the Dark Side of Surrealism

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louboutin-2

“I hate the whole concept of comfort!” Christian Louboutin infamously remarked in a 2011 New Yorker profile. And the designer’s distaste for comfort goes far beyond the pitch of a stiletto. Louboutin’s more irreverent sensibilities emerged anew today, with a calendar lookbook that’s already raising a few Internet eyebrows.

Reminiscent of David Lynch or Guy Bourdin, the images show Louboutin’s Fall ’14 wares on impeccably sheeny gams and feet, which are lopped off mid-thigh and nestled in boxes full of crisp tissue paper. The Telegraph‘s Kate Finnigan called foul, with a reminder that even our objects of lust “need a body, a heart, a mind too.” We’d humbly submit that while many a glossy ad campaign boasts plenty of body, heart and mind are considerably harder to come by. Moreover, when’s the last time you saw a face featured in a footwear lookbook? Louboutin’s cheeky new offering boasts no blood and no gore—just a healthy dose of Pop surrealism.

Photos: via The Telegraph

Surgical Foot Face-lifts—Just Part of the “Real World”

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prada

Think Chinese foot binding died out with the Qing Dynasty? Think again! According to a report in The New York Times, well-to-do women are seeking out plastic surgery so their tootsies can painlessly slip into high-fashion kicks by the likes of Christian Louboutin, Nicholas Kirkwood, and Manolo Blahnik. “On the surface, it looked shallow,” offered podiatrist Dr. Ali Sadrieh, who performs a variety of face-lifts for the feet. “But I came to see she needs these shoes to project confidence, they are part of her outside skin. That’s the real world.” I’d have to imagine that his definition of the “real world” is a loose one or, at the very least, exclusive to moneyed locales like Park Avenue and Beverly Hills.

Wouldn’t commissioning custom shoes or, maybe, petitioning designers to make more wearable stilettos be ever-so-slightly less shallow, not to mention less expensive? You could also try my (only mildly less ridiculous) method of choice—foot Pilates—for which I’m frequently, and rightly, laughed at by my friends. Even better, you could just buy Prada, who, thanks to its embrace of wide soles, makes some of the most comfortable skyscrapers on the planet.

Photo: Cesare Medri  

The Brooklyn Museum’s Going Head Over Heels

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LouboutinWe’re the first to admit that heels are a powerful thing. Each season we manage to add a few (or a dozen) must-have pairs to our overstuffed wardrobes. And why? Is it because heels are sexy? Flattering? Outfit-making? Or just fun to wear? The Brooklyn Museum will explore these questions (and many more) with its upcoming exhibition Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe. On view from September 10, the exhibit will feature 160 heels from as early as the 17th century to today. A main focus will be the sculptural, architectural, and artistic qualities of high heels, which range from the wearable to the avant-garde. On one end of the spectrum will be designs by household names like Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Chanel, and Roger Vivier, on the other, conceptual styles by Iris van Herpen, Elsa Schiaparelli, Zaha Hadid, and many more.

Highlights from the exhibit include Marilyn Monroe’s Ferragamo stilettos from 1959; silk, metal, and glass mules by Vivier for House of Dior from 1960; Céline’s mink-covered pumps from Spring ’13; eight-inch platforms designed by Rem D. Koolhaas for Lady Gaga; and mind-bending 3-D-printed heels by Van Herpen.

In addition to the show, there will be a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Stefano Tonchi, Lisa Small, and Caroline Weber, as well as six short films inspired by high heels. The films were commissioned from artists including Steven Klein, Nick Knight, and Marilyn Minter. The full exhibition will also be traveling to other venues, which have yet to be announced.

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe will run from September 10, 2014 through February 15, 2015 at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238. For more information, visit brooklynmuseum.org.

Photo: Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum 

Teddy Bears Get All Dressed Up for Charity

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Charity Bears

Mark your calendars—on December 10, Mark Ronson will head to New York’s Highline Ballroom to host The Other Ball: a soiree and auction whose proceeds will go to Arms Around the Child. Founded by Leigh Blake, the charity aims to provide struggling children in developing countries with a loving home, medical treatment, protection, and education. Underwritten by Topshop, the event will feature performances from The Black Keys, A$AP Rocky, Lykke Li, and more. And if the party isn’t enough to get you in a giving mood, the one-of-a-kind teddy bears up for auction most certainly will. Christian Louboutin, Alexander Wang, Topshop’s Topman, Opening Ceremony, Thom Browne, Simon Doonan, and Chromat have each put their own spin on the stuffed toys, which, crafted from black leather, are surprisingly subversive. “I had so much fun reimagining my bear,” offered Doonan of his buckle-and-spike-embellished design. “I channeled Helmut Newton and added a dollop of Christopher Street circa the seventies. I wanted to show that bears can be kinky, too.” Wang’s version also has a dark side, what with its silver X-eyed executioner’s mask and black studded collar. Louboutin, meanwhile, whipped up a superhero-style bear, complete with a cape and paws in his signature hue of red, and Thom Browne’s iteration is dressed in one of the designer’s unmistakable cropped suits. “We need to bring more awareness to the importance of children’s happiness, well-being, and innocence,” said Browne of the project. Each bear will go under the hammer for a starting price of $1,000, and if you can’t make it to the Ball, online and telephone bids will be accepted until noon on Tuesday. For information on bidding and tickets, visit theotherball.org.

Photo: Courtesy Photo