Style.com

July 29 2014

styledotcom Ready to shop for Fall? Here are the trends to know: stylem.ag/1uDWGwe pic.twitter.com/v0joN2Uyc4

Subscribe to Style Magazine
27 posts tagged "Christie’s"

The Birkin Whisperer Ignites a Lawsuit Against Christie’s

-------

US-FRANCE-FASHION-LUXURY-BAGS-AUCTIONIt’s a battle of the Birkins for Heritage Auctions and Christie’s International. Matthew Rubinger, formerly the resident Hermès handbag expert at Heritage, recently departed the company to join Christie’s, and took Heritage’s “trade secrets” along with him. The New York Times reports that no one knows rare Birkins like Rubinger, 26, who began buying and reselling purses back in high school. Heritage claims in the lawsuit that it invested in his identity, branded him as a star, and introduced him to sources in Hong Kong and Japan. It goes without saying that they were less than pleased when Rubinger traded teams, and they have since filed a lawsuit against Christie’s, Rubinger, and two high-level associates who also left, for breach of contract and stealing trade secrets. Rubinger and his associates’ departure from the auction house left Heritage with essentially no luxury accessories team.

While Heritage has always specialized in high-end accessories, Christie’s, a house generally more concerned with Picasso and Matisse than Hermès and Chanel, has recently made a push into the luxury fashion market. Heritage is seeking $60 million in damages and lost profits, a number that reflects the significant earnings Heritage raked in from Hermès handbag sales. Last December, Heritage sold a one-of-a-kind porosus crocodile and black Togo leather Kelly bag for $125,000, and in late 2011, a red crocodile Birkin bag with 18-karat white-gold and diamond hardware went for a record $203,000. Without those sizable profits, it’s unclear how Heritage will continue with its current plans to expand the business.

Photo: Stan Honda / Getty Images

Kick Off the New Year With Some Old Schiaparelli

-------

SchiaparelliDidn’t get quite what you hoped for this Christmas? Don’t fret, just gather up those gift receipts, exchange your unwanted trinkets for cash, and head over to Christie’s in Paris. On January 23 (which, it should be noted, is the last day of the Haute Couture shows), the auction house will put 180 items from Elsa Schiaparelli’s personal collection under the hammer. The treasures—which include vintage Schiaparelli wares, a totally divine tête-à-tête chaise in pink (what other color would it be?), the legend’s 1936 Giacometti floor lamp, and original portraits of the designer—are expected to grab about 700,000 pounds. If you can’t make it to Paris for the sale, just tune in to Style.com on January 20, when Schiaparelli’s newly appointed creative director, Marco Zanini, will present his debut collection for the revived house.

Photo: Christie’s, via dailymail.co.uk

Draw Something: Fashion Illustration Takes the Spotlight

-------

Illustrations by David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Last night in London, Christie’s South Kensington auction house played host to an exhibition and discussion orchestrated by the Fashion Illustration Gallery (FIG). And while the audience sat through the Issa London-sponsored talk, whose panel included Christie’s Meredith Etherington-Smith, illustrator David Downton (whose work is pictured above, top left), and Style.com’s Tim Blanks, they were left wondering: Should astute art investors buy up fashion illustration in the same way the world should have snatched up early Basquiat or Koons? “Before Andy Warhol was Andy Warhol, he was a fashion illustrator,” said Etherington-Smith. “Fifty years ago, the art world debated whether photography was a bona fide art form, and the same is happening now with fashion illustration. I believe there is no doubt fashion illustration is an art, but a vastly underappreciated one.”

The art on display last night represented the old guard like Cecil Beaton, Antonio Lopez (above, bottom left), and Andy Warhol, as well as such new talents as Gary Card (above, top right), Zoë Taylor (above, bottom right), and Tanya Ling. Strange bedfellows? Not according to Downton. “Some of the younger fashion illustrators out there are the most skilled draftsmen,” he said. “They very much should take their place alongside the great artists of days gone.”

Among the questions thrown out to an audience that included Suzy Menkes, Camilla Al Fayed, and Susie Bubble: Will fashion illustration ever be accepted as an art form? And will magazine editors ever replace celebs for illustrations? Downton, perhaps, answered these queries best. “The illustration I did a few years back of Cate Blanchett for Australian Vogue was, against all odds, the fastest-selling issue of the year. It also won the Maggie’s Magazine Cover of the Year. After that, there was no doubt for me that there is a place in the art world for fashion illustration.”

FIG’s exhibition at Christie’s South Kensington runs through December 19.

Illustrations: David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Disney Does Designer

-------

Disney Dresses

Having made their debuts in Harrods’ holiday windows last year, Versace’s Cinderella dress, Valentino’s butter-yellow Belle gown, Oscar de la Renta’s Snow White frock, and Escada’s Princess Jasmine look will go under the hammer—for charity—alongside other designer Disney-princess duds at Christie’s, on November 13. Prince Charming is not included in the auction price.

Photo: Courtesy of Harrods

Christie’s Hosts Old Queens and New

-------

Alexander McQueenIn the age of Middleton mania, there’s no shortage of mythology (or obsession) surrounding what it means to be a queen.

On June 4, Christie’s will unveil a preview of new exhibition, A Queen Within: Adorned Archetypes, Fashion, and Chess, which, opening in October at the World Chess Hall of Fame in Saint Louis, examines the principal monarch from a freshly cerebral perspective.

“It all started with the chess museum in Saint Louis,” relayed Swedish curator Sofia Hedman of the impending preview. “The idea is that each piece on the chessboard can be seen as a different personality, and the queen incorporates the different personalities a woman can have—the enchantress, the explorer, the ruler, the mother, and others.”

Rare pieces—Hussein Chalayan’s iconic bubble dress from Spring 2007, Maison Martin Margiela’s Spring 2001 vest made entirely from baseball gloves, and more than a few ornately embroidered gowns by Alexander McQueen (left)—are placed among lesser-known new works from “very, very unpredictable and very experimental” designers, like Charlie Le Mindu and Jordan Askill. Each touches on a different element of the regal persona, with plenty of reference to royal Dutch portraiture from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Continue Reading “Christie’s Hosts Old Queens and New” »