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10 posts tagged "Christopher Shannon"

More Details Emerge On London’s Menswear Week

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After cramming a city’s worth of menswear offerings into a single MAN Day for the last few seasons, London is planning to give its standout men’s offerings a bit more room to breathe. The first men’s-only London fashion collections (technically three days, rather than a few weeks) will take place June 15 to 17, with opening programs including a launch event hosted by Prince Charles. In addition to the young London designers who have been showing on MAN DAY—like J.W. Anderson, James Long, Topman, Lou Dalton, and Christopher Shannon—the new opportunity has lured several U.K. brands back to their home turf, including Pringle of Scotland and Nicole Farhi, who have been showing in Milan, and Dunhill. E. Tautz, Hardy Amies, and Richard James will show ready-to-wear collections on Savile Row, and Richard Nicoll (pictured) will debut a menswear collection. The full schedule is now available at www.londoncollections.co.uk.

Photo: John Sciulli / Getty Images

At London’s MAN Day, A Dance With Decadence And Repentance

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Jo-Ann Furniss reports on the highs and lows of London fashion week’s dedicated menswear day.

Fat Tuesday swiftly followed by Ash Wednesday, excess followed by penance. London fashion week’s MAN Day had the luck to fall on the latter this season. After the heady womenswear week closing on Tuesday, was it the turn of the sackcloth and ashes of menswear for Wednesday? Not quite; there were still some traces of carnival in the first day of Lent, even if at times they looked like the discarded remnants.

Earlier in the week, knit line Sibling’s carnival-referencing women’s collection, Sister, had been presented, alongside a few looks from the men’s—it made their best outing yet. But for the full men’s presentation on MAN Day, the party was over: Designers Joe Bates, Sid Bryan, and Cozette McCreery created an installation (pictured, above) in the form of a prison visiting room with a clever film by Sam Renwick and Thomas Bryant. It was in the shape of a triptych echoing the visiting booths, complete with telephone connections to the sound. “It’s where a matriarch might visit a son. Or vice versa,” Bates said. Yet the clothes were still their bright, excessive selves even behind bars. Called Marked Man, with designs based partly on prison tattoos, there was as much of the matriarch in the collection as there was the jailbird. An institutional bright orange was combined with pink ocelot spots in a men’s twinset. Their signature Fair Isle knits were further warped with the seamless addition of a skull with pompom ears blended into the traditional patterns. (It reflected the pompom-decorated full face masks and beanies also on view.) At once sinister and sweet, carnivalesque and penitential, there was something quite Leigh Bowery and Trojan in these proceedings that felt very true to the spirit of London. At the same time, Sibling’s output is so accomplished as to hold a global audience with ease.

Christopher Shannon’s catwalk was the first thing you noticed at his show. The brilliant backdrop was by the all-round creative and too-many-credits-to-mention Julie Verhoeven. “Creatively, I trust her implicitly,” said Shannon backstage. “I did want that inside of a Hoover bag vibe.” That’s certainly what he got. The set featured old tires, strewn pink net curtains with bricks caught in them, abandoned foil balloons in the shape of love hearts, and the bottom half of a female shop dummy, among other violent after-party detritus. At their best, the clothes and accessories had something of this random perversity, too; a broderie anglaise shirt with a ruffled back, a jacket covered in the designer’s swing tags, and a rucksack decorated with innumerable key rings. “We started excessive and pared back,” said the designer, yet there was maybe a bit too much paring back or, ultimately, the simple color palette of navy, white, sand, and black was a little too conservative or too flat to really help make some of the interesting points he was driving at. Continue Reading “At London’s MAN Day, A Dance With Decadence And Repentance” »

Jo-Ann Furniss On London’s Man Day

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“Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.” So said Gore Vidal, yet this statement could easily be applied to the best of the designers at London fashion week’s Man Day.

There was something peculiarly British and personal about much that was on offer this season. Our particular genre of sportswear was mined mercilessly. It is something that many of the young designers showing here were weaned on from school age, and it was always much more about style in its appropriation rather than fashion. Christopher Shannon, Martine Rose, Matthew Miller, and New Power Studio were all treading on this territory. Yet at its best, this initial inspiration took flight into something much less nostalgic and into something much more personal and fashion focused—these are fashion shows and collections, after all—spliced together in a hybridized way to become much more theatrical.

This was true of the best elements in Christopher Shannon’s collection (above), which lifted them away from just going through the sportswear motions of “scally drag.” His tasseled pieces had that decorative and tribal element that was also emerging in many of the shows (he explained he had been looking at the African photography of Pieter Hugo), and his “comb crowns” reinforced this peculiar point. Continue Reading “Jo-Ann Furniss On London’s Man Day” »

A Peek Backstage At Marc, The Men You’ll Meet On Man Day, And More…

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Talk about multitasking: Juergen Teller’s new campaign for Marc Jacobs—starring Masha Kirsanova and Caroline Brasch Nielsen—was shot backstage at Jacobs’ Spring ’11 show (left). [Fashionologie]

The womenswear winners of London’s NewGen sponsorships were announced earlier this week, and now the prize is spotlighting the men: J.W. Anderson, Christopher Shannon, and James Long will show their menswear on the runway during LFW’s Man Day, while Lou Dalton, Katie Eary, Omar Kashoura, and knit wits Sibling will have their presentations supported. (Men’s designer Christopher Raeburn, who was listed among the winners yesterday, will also have his installation underwritten.) [Vogue U.K.]

It’s time (again) for Diane von Furstenberg to clear some space on her mantel: The indefatigable designer will receive amfAR’s Award of Courage—alongside President Bill Clinton and Elizabeth Taylor—at the AIDS research nonprofit’s silver anniversary gala next year. [WWD]

Leandra Medine, better known as the voice of Man Repeller, is the high priestess of high-waisted pants—and shoulder pads, schlumpy layers, and all of the other “girls get it, guys don’t” fashion choices out there. Men may be repelled, but the Times wasn’t; Medine got the full profile treatment today. [NYT]

And here’s more from Ford: The latest glimpses of TF’s womenswear come courtesy of W, which shot a few looks, styled by Alex White and shot by Inez and Vinoodh, on Lara Stone. [W]

Photo: Juergen Teller

Prints And Punks, In Town From London

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Many of London fashion’s young guns are in town this week for a few days of press appointments and sales at the behest of the London Showroom. It was a bit of a mad affair, with 20-odd designers and their Spring collections piled into a penthouse at the Soho Grand, but the mood fit the frenetic, often quite lovely collections.

It was hard not to love the eye-popping prints Holly Fulton screens on silk dresses and jersey shifts, then punches up with heaping handfuls of Swarovski crystals. There was a Lichtenstein-ish cloud print that would’ve suited a particularly chic cartoon character, and a spiky horsehair clutch to go along with. Prints were the word, too, at Mary Katrantzou’s interiors-inspired collection, which hits Barneys exclusively in the U.S. this season. She, too, got the Swarovski blessing (and a dip into the company coffers), which she used to create crystal-bedecked lampshade skirts and a great little multicolored cuff.

There were notes of soft color and texture for girls from Michael van der Ham and for blokes from Christopher Shannon. But it wasn’t all sweetness and light. There was a punk buzz emanating from a few strong collections, like Meadham Kirchhoff, Sibling, and Dominic Jones. Jones, a jeweler, softened punky studs into architectural, Deco shapes for his Spring ’11 collection—and shot it on Alice Dellal, something of a softened punky herself (left). And the knitwear trio of Sibling—who, incidentally, have a Topshop line, Sister by Sibling, in the offing—banged on to that beat, too. One intarsia’ed sweater depicted the Statue of Liberty sporting a mohawk; another piece, a collaboration with the English artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster, famous for their neon-light word pieces, blared “GIRLFRIEND FROM HELL” and “PUNY UNDERNOURISHED KID” in embroidery on a cotton sweatsuit. Their best gave Robert Indiana’s famous LOVE painting a dressing down (right). As the Beatles once said (or didn’t they?), “All You Need Is Punk.”

Photos: Courtesy of Dominic Jones; Courtesy of Sibling