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July 29 2014

styledotcom What do you get when you combine a literary festival with a rock concert, a fashion happening, and a flower show? stylem.ag/UxTge7

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9 posts tagged "Cindy Sherman"

Inside Duro Olowu’s World of Rebellion

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Duro Olowu
Duro Olowu

Two years ago, London-based designer Duro Olowu brought a collection of globally sourced inspirations to Salon 94′s Freeman Alley space. The wares were combed from all over the world—from his birthplace in Lagos, Nigeria, to the quieter corners of his adopted hometown—and included such cherished ephemera as vintage Parisian Deco wallpaper and feather-lined lamps from Uganda.

Now Olowu is expanding upon his 2012 show with More Material, an exhibition that opened last night at Salon 94 on the Bowery and brings together works from the likes of Carrie Mae Weems, Juergen Teller, Cindy Sherman, Laurie Simmons, and more, alongside colorfully curated home items from vintage dealers near and far.

“The show is really an extension of my last show,” related Olowu. “[This time] I really wanted to show the rebellious side of women, the way they’re represented, and the way they represent themselves with elegance—elegant rebellion.”

Duro Olowu

Swooping fashion illustrations by Antonio Lopez (“They’re very, very alluring without being vulgar—a new rebellion,” noted Olowu) rest alongside documentary street photography from Sandy Kim (“I just see a cool tomboy who wants to have fun”) and more overtly political/feminist-leaning works from Weems, Sherman, and others. As in the case of the original rendition, there’s also a shop selling new Duro Olowu pieces, as well as artworks—a Lopez, a Lorna Simpson—and hand-selected vintage house and jewelry objects.

“It’s going to be up for a month and a half, and I’d love for people to experience the beauty and integrity of the incredible mix of artists and ceramics and great jewelry and just feel empowered,” said the designer. “I’d like young girls, older women, and middle-aged ladies to feel empowered by wanting to be individual.”

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Charlotte Olympia Steps Up for Art

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CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA and GAGOSIAN GALLERY Present Stepping Up For Art

Last night at the Gagosian Gallery’s Madison Avenue space, twenty of Charlotte Olympia’s signature Dolly shoes were radically reinterpreted for the sake of art. Aptly dubbed Stepping Up for Art, the exhibit—on view for three days—saw twenty contemporary artists including Jeff Koons, Ed Ruscha, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Laurie Simmons, Sachs, and George Condo (above) use the high-heeled platform as a blank canvas.

The project’s chief architect was not the brand’s London-based designer, Charlotte Dellal—although she was in attendance and in utter awe of her refashioned platforms—but 16-year-old India Wolf, the daughter of artist Maya Lin and collector Daniel Wolf.

“India approached me after having seen the hand-painted shoes I had done at Neiman Marcus in Bal Harbour during Art Basel Miami—they were painted in the style of contemporary 20th-century artists like Picasso—and she said, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if we actually did them with living artists in their own way rather than imitating?’ I thought it was a fantastic idea,” offered Dellal.

One year later, Wolf, with some help from her parents (“They advised me in the beginning about how to write the proper letters and how to ask the right people,” she said), was able to secure the participation of leading contemporary artists. Shoes were slashed by Sarah Sze, burned by Tom Sachs, bound by Christo, and photographed by David Levinthal. She also partnered with Studio in a School, a nonprofit organization that promotes arts education in New York City’s underfunded public schools.

Five schools—including PS 196 Bronx, PS 45 Queens, PS 16 Staten Island, PS 39 Brooklyn, and PS 75 Manhattan—also contributed their inventive Dollys to the show. “The kids’ work is so surprising, they don’t disappoint, either,” offered Thomas Cahill, president and CEO of Studio in a School. “That’s one of the lovely things about [Stepping Up for Art], the process and the respect for their work is mirrored by the whole respect that the Gagosian gallery has…these kids will have the memory of this forever.”

For Wolf, this night would surely be more memorable than prom. The Dalton sophomore and toast of the party wore Charlotte Olympia’s blank-canvased Dollys paired with a Spring ’14 Mary Katrantzou graphic print dress. “I’d love to work in art and fashion when I’m older,” she said, later citing Oscar de la Renta and Christopher Kane as two of her favorite designers. “I mean, I don’t wear their clothes. They’re too expensive,” she said with youthful modesty. “Half of my wardrobe is J.Crew and Madewell.”

Michele Lamy: Adorned and Unfiltered

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Michele Lamy

“These were some of the first shoes Rick ever made when he was in Hollywood,” said Michele Lamy at the opening of Show and Tell: Calder Jewelry and Mobiles last night. Lamy—the wife and muse of Rick Owens—was referring to a pair of sky-high, heelless black platforms that she wore while effortlessly climbing the spiral staircase of Salon94‘s uptown gallery. Lamy had come into town from Paris to style the exhibition, which showcased the oft-overlooked crowns, earrings, necklaces, and cuffs (most of which are for sale through Salon94) crafted by twentieth-century sculptor and painter Alexander Calder. “I screamed when I first saw the jewelry,” professed Lamy during our interview, pulling her tattoo- and ring-covered fingers to the chest of her Comme des Garçons vest. She flashed a smile, exposing her gold and diamond teeth. “I’m such a fan of his.”

In addition to styling models for the event, Lamy enlisted artist Matthew Stone to snap Polaroids (with Andy Warhol’s camera, no less) of guests donning Calder’s creations. Furthermore, she’s working with artist Youssef Nabil on a Calder-centric photo series, which will star such characters as Debbie Harry, Cindy Sherman, Björk, Joni Mitchell, and Cher.

Although Lamy is most frequently associated with Owens, whom she met in her forties, she’s led an enthralling and utterly eccentric existence all her own. “It’s like she’s had ten lives,” said artist Carson McColl, who flew in from London for the fete with his boyfriend, Gareth Pugh. Considering she’s spent time as a cabaret dancer, an L.A. club kid, a fashion designer, a law-school student, and a stripper, he was hardly exaggerating. Here, Lamy talks to Style.com about Rick Owens’ Spring show, Calder’s work, and her taste in jewelry.

This exhibition celebrates an artist who also made jewelry. Do you think that jewelry and fashion are art?
That’s always the question! Some think art is unique pieces, and the Calder pieces are unique. If you do your own piece, it could be art. It’s very difficult to know the difference. Calder’s pieces were made by hand, and I think that makes it art. Clothing is more difficult because you have to produce more of it.

Do you think what you and Rick create is art?
I hope our life is.

Are your and Rick’s creative visions always in line? Do they ever differ?
They differ, but he always wins. If you don’t have the same aesthetic values, it’s difficult to live with somebody. If you don’t have the same political ideas or whatever, it’s fine. But if somebody says, “Oh, I like this,” you have to know what it is and feel the same way. Because he’s the designer, he’s the one at the front, and then I’m navigating. He’s the captain, but I’m pushing him.

You’re the current.
Yes.

I recently interviewed Nicola Formichetti, and he said that Rick’s Spring show “changed everything” and that he and the other designers who watched it “were all jealous of his genius.” What is your reaction to that, and how did you feel about the show?
It was extraordinary to come [to the States] after the show, because it was around Halloween and there were people who went dressed as Rick Owens steppers! I told him immediately that this was a statement. The show was such a burst of joy and emotion. Those girls rehearsed themselves. It’s what they do, and all their hearts were in it. It was a burst of humanité, générosité, and loving, and everything was fantastic. Rick said that it was so real that he’s not going to try to top this show…of course, we’ll see. You know, in New York there was a discussion about [race on the runway], and then [people said] that Rick did this show and it was the answer. But it was just a spontaneous gesture—wanting to express how you feel about yourself to the world. Continue Reading “Michele Lamy: Adorned and Unfiltered” »

See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book

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Andy Warhol 
From Warhol’s Factory to Basquiat’s studio, throughout the eighties, downtown Manhattan was the place for young creative types to be. Photographer Jeannette Montgomery Barron was there, and her new tome, Scene, is a sort of yearbook of the time, documenting the likes of Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, Francesco Clemente, Willem Dafoe, and more early in their careers. “I was just a fly on the wall,” recalls Montgomery Barron, speaking at Indochine, one of her old haunts. (“It looks almost exactly the same, but there were a lot of drugs happening in the bathrooms back then.”) This afternoon, she’ll sign copies of Scene—which, in addition to the snaps, features personal anecdotes about each artist—at Bookmarc, and starting tomorrow, a select group of her black-and-white photographs will be on display in an exhibition at ClampArt. Here, Montgomery Barron discusses her book, and reminisces about shooting Warhol, working out with Bianca Jagger, and spending time with Basquiat.

 

How did you find yourself in the center of the eighties New York art scene?  

I was just lucky. It’s not that I went out and said, “I want to record every artist from A to Z.” It was more like I’d photograph Francesco Clemente, and he’d say, “You should really go photograph my friend Kenny Scharf.” It was very organic in that way. And, I mean, I knew I could drop a name. I’m sure I said, “Hey, I’m a friend of Andy Warhol. Can I shoot you?” I guess I’d get an adrenaline surge.

 

In the book, you mention that you could just call up Andy Warhol and ask to take his picture. What were those sittings like?  

The first time I photographed him was at the Factory in Union Square, and he wouldn’t even let me out of the outer lobby. When I met Bianca Jagger and we became friends, he warmed up. He never really talked much, but he always made you feel like you were the most brilliant person who said the most profound things. Continue Reading “See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book” »

James Franco Welcomes You to Gay Town

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James Franco’s face—usually found in Gucci ads, movies, and plastered across celebrity-gossip sites—is seen everywhere in Gay Town, his second solo show in Berlin with the Peres Projects gallery. A veritable self-portrait, the multimedia installation responds to obsession with celebrity. And thanks to his position as, well, a celebrity, Franco offers a unique, insider perspective on fandom and stardom in what seems like an attempt to turn Hollywood stereotypes on their heads. Take, for instance, the collection of five hundred rugs Franco presents, many covered with screenshots of fans’ blogs, gossip sites, and Huffington Post slams of his social life, sex life, and intellectual pursuits. Franco scrawls defensive notes all over these images. “To make a self-portrait of my public persona, instead of me in my bedroom, is to make my art about something larger,” said Franco. There’s even a lo-fi video enactment of one fan’s slash-fiction fantasies of Franco having sex with Spider-Man and prison inmates. Indeed, if anyone is qualified to comment on obsessive celebrity culture, it’s Mr. Franco. One of his rugs reads, “Cindy Sherman is not recognized at her own show.” Something tells us that, for better or worse, the actor-cum-artist doesn’t have that problem.

Gay Town is on view at Peres Projects in Berlin through March 9.

Photo:Alonso Dominguez