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April 19 2014

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26 posts tagged "Coco Chanel"

Prada and “Schiap”: The Conversations Begin

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Today in Milan, the fashion set got a glimpse of some of the Schiaparelli and Prada pieces that will be on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations exhibition, opening May 10. How does one make an impossible conversation between two great designers from different eras possible? Curators Harold Koda and Andrew Bolton dug through Prada’s archive, as well as the Costume Institute’s collection and private collections, and culled 90 designs and 30 accessories by the two Italian female designers to demonstrate the arresting affinities between their work (Elsa Schiaparelli from the late twenties to early fifties, Miuccia Prada from the late eighties to the present). Take note, these are the first female designers to be the centerpiece of the annual exhibition since Coco Chanel in 2005.

The “conversation” plays out in seven themes, starting with “Waist/Waist Down” (which includes a 1937 black and white Schiaparelli number worn by Madonna’s latest film subject, Wallis Simpson, sitting next to a very similar recent look from Prada). It continues with “Ugly Chic,” “Naif Chic,” “The Classical Body,” “The Exotic Body,” and finally, “The Surreal Body.” The galleries featuring iconic ensembles by the designers are paired with videos, directed by Baz Luhrmann, with made-up conversations between the two women (the idea for these “impossible conversations” was inspired by a Vanity Fair series of unimaginable exchanges in the thirties). Here, a few images from the exhibition.

Photos: Courtesy of Teh Metropolitan Museum of Art

To The Cosmos And Back At The Haute Joaillerie Collections

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Coco Chanel launched her house’s fine jewelry collection in 1932, holding an exposition de bijoux de diamants for two weeks in November on the Faubourg Saint-Honoré. (The diamond Franges necklace above was in the original collection.) “Reason prompted me, initially, to create faux jewelry because I find it free of arrogance in an era of facile luxury,” Chanel explained. “This consideration vanishes in a period of financial crisis, when there arises an instinctive desire for authenticity in all things, which brings amusing junk back to its rightful place.”

You don’t have to look far for amusing junk—or a financial crisis—in our own day and age. As part of Paris’ haute couture week, the fine jewelry houses, including Chanel, Dior, and Van Cleef & Arpels, offered some very authentic options to discerning buyers, in new collections referencing past glories. Style.com’s Tina Isaac reports.

Coco Chanel loved a good talisman, and she decked her private apartment with an array of lucky frogs, sheaves of wheat, and special-order double-Cs and 5s for her chandelier overhead. But she was especially proud of being a Leo. And so for the first time, a lion jewel is set to appear chez Chanel as part of 1932, an 80-piece collection marking 80 years since the house entered the world of high jewelry.

In the meantime, the house previewed a selection of jewels based on iconic Chanel symbols, including a new rendition of the Comète necklace in titanium, white gold, and 85 carats of diamonds, as well as shooting star rings, bracelets, and necklaces. Among the standouts: the stunning Céleste brooch, a rendering of the cosmos anchored by a 79-carat baroque gray pearl.

Dior Joaillerie will launch an iconic new jewelry line during the Paris collections to accompany a lush compendium published by Rizzoli, so consider this display an aperitif: Incroyables et Merveilleuse earrings rendered as pendants, a Rose Dior Bagatelle ring in rubies and diamonds, and rose quartz renditions of the Pré Catelan ring and necklace.

A favorite of Wallis and Jackie, Van Cleef & Arpels is a doyenne of the Place Vendôme—and it’s got a major retrospective in the works at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs set for September. By way of a prelude, the house displayed a handful of birds of various sizes and colors, dating from the 1920′s to the 1960′s, the forebears of the brightly plumed Birds of Paradise, 2012 vintage. More abstract now than in the past, the new jewelry collection is informed by sweeping arabesques on necklaces and a number of colorful between-the-finger rings, such as a Bird of Paradise circling a ruby. “Mismatched” earrings with different colored stones in each ear, and a cascading necklace of turquoise beads culminating in a gem-encrusted parrot swinging on his perch, rounded out the new collection.

CLICK HERE FOR A SLIDESHOW of some of the key looks from the current haute joaillerie collections, as well as key archival pieces that inspired the new lines.

Photo: Courtesy of Chanel

Exclusive: Chanel For Rent

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“For vintage, Chanel is the most glamorous and sought-after accessories and jewelry brand in the market today,” Rent the Runway consulting fashion director Lucy Sykes tells Style.com. “To work with vintage Chanel products on any level is totally inspiring.”

Starting tomorrow, Rent the Runway, a sort of Netflix for fashion that allows users to borrow pieces that retail in the high four and five figures for a rental fee, is adding vintage to its stable of options. Thanks to a partnership with Soho vintage shop What Goes Around Comes Around, Rent the Runway is beginning the retail initiative with Chanel, whose vintage pieces are among the most coveted there are. For four or eight days, a $6,160 Coco bag can be yours—for $350.

To show off their new goods, Rent the Runway enlisted the help of Sykes and photographer Sophie Elgort (daughter of the famed lensman Arthur Elgort) to shoot the goods at WGACA. “My inspiration was a little sixties and very dressed up,” Sykes says of the look. “I wanted to have fun with it and throw in some fabulous hot pink Prabal [Gurung] dresses and a totally chic Moschino black dress with a cute peplum.” Style.com has the exclusive behind-the-scenes photos from their shoot (below). Expect to see more vintage labels rolling out on Rent the Runway soon.



Photos: Courtesy of Rent The Runway

A New Coco Chanel Biography Heats Up, James Franco Does Invisible Art, The New Yorker Helps Out Fashion-Phobes, And More…

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Biographer Lisa Chaney called her new Chanel exposé Coco Chanel: An Intimate Life. “Intimate” is putting it mildly. WWD reports that Chaney “claims to have concrete evidence that the designer used drugs, embraced bisexuality, and had an affair with Salvador Dalí while he was married.” [WWD]

Over the weekend, the royal family convened for another wedding. The Queen, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, and more turned out for Zara Phillips and Mike Tindall’s wedding at Canongate Kirk church in Edinburgh. The bride wore an ivory silk satin gown by Stewart Parvin. [Vogue.U.K.]

James Franco has delved into his latest project and it’s called the Museum of Non-Visible Art. Wait, what? Yes, you won’t actually be able to see the artwork—it’s all about the imagination. But never mind that. The important part is, it’s still for sale. [Hint]

Speaking of art with imagination, Alexander McQueen’s revered designs on display at the Met are breaking museum records. As of Friday morning, at least 553,000 people had been through to see the exhibit and when it closes this weekend, it is expected to rank among the museum’s 20 most popular exhibits since they started tracking the number of visitors over 50 years ago. [NYT]

At last, The New Yorker has provided a cure for the fashion-phobic male. For men who suffer from dizziness, feel uncomfortable with European sizing, and hate having to lug “garish shopping bags” home, Patricia Marx offers some advice on expanding your sartorial horizons. [The New Yorker]

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com

In The Backseat With Louis Vuitton, Summer Crochet Hits The Streets (Literally), Gaga On Top, And More…

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“Who wouldn’t want to be this gorgeous young woman in the back seat of this beautiful car?” asks Marc Jacobs of his upcoming Fall Louis Vuitton ad campaign. Answer: no one. Even the dogs came barking to be in the picture, although only seven of them made the final cut to sit on the laps of the six up-and-coming models, including Daphne Groeneveld, Anais Pouliot, and Fei Fei Sun. [WWD]

She designs, she dictates trends, she… sings? The eternal Coco Chanel gets revived (literally) in Coco the musical, which comes to London’s Sadler’s Wells this June. Katherine Hepburn played the lady in the original Broadway production; Sara Kestelman, a Royal Shakespeare Company and National Theater alum, takes the part this time around. [Vogue U.K.]

We’re in the mood for summer crochet, and so, it turns out, are a group of guerrilla artists. Sidewalk cracks, park benches, and telephones worldwide are being dressed up—”yarn bombed” as they call it—by graffiti grandmas. We’d say this is far and away in the lead for oddest summer trend. Anyone want to step up to unseat it? [NYT]

Red is the heart and sole of the Louboutin brand. Although Christian Louboutin secured rights to the rouge sole back in 2008, he’s currently in court defending his brand’s trademark. It’s (sorry!) no shoe-in case just yet. [AdWeek]

She wasn’t “Born This Way,” but Lady Gaga has earned 32 million friends (on Facebook), 10 million Little Monsters (Twitter followers), $4.5 billion (in the last 12 months), and now, the top spot on Forbes’ Celebrity 100 List. Now that Gaga has knocked Oprah as the reigning queen of the list, we can safely say the world has officially gone Gaga. [Forbes]

Photo: Steven Meisel / Courtesy of Louis Vuitton