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July 10 2014

styledotcom An #exclusive first look at the new @Nike Mercurial Superfly HTM in Volt: stylem.ag/1lWL7Gm pic.twitter.com/ACqYrJtgMm

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8 posts tagged "Corinne Day"

Kate Moss Gets The Birthday Treatment

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Kate moss

Kate Moss—that perennial British beauty first captured by the late Corinne Day on the sandy shores of Borneo as a teenager—is turning 40. The iconic model—who has charmed us for decades with her no-holds-barred bohemian look, caused controversy as a proponent of the “Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels” camp, and, most recently, posed in the nude for Playboy‘s sixtieth-anniversary issue (shot by Mert & Marcus)—is also the subject of a new exhibition entitled Kate Moss: 40—A Retrospective at Imitate Modern gallery, in London. Put together by Kate admirer and artist Russell Marshall, the exhibition will feature ten specially selected and salient images from Kate’s extensive career. Each image will be treated in the CMYK color model and be accompanied by a brief biography of the supe. “‘Celebrity’ can be short-lived these days,” Marshall told The Telegraph. “But not so with Kate…. She grows bigger, brighter, and more iconic each year.” The exhibit, rather appropriately, begins January 17, the day after Moss’ birthday, and runs through February 25, 2014.

Photo: via The Telegraph

Back to the Dark Side: Panos Yiapanis on Love and His Creative Evolution

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You can’t miss a Panos Yiapanis photograph. Since beginning his career in the late nineties—working alongside photographer Corinne Day—the 38-year-old stylist has honed a dark, gritty, raw-to-the-bone aesthetic that is distinctly his own. His particular vision has led to a longstanding creative relationship with Rick Owens, as well as countless spreads in such magazines as i-D, W, and Vogue Italia shot by the likes of Steven Meisel, Inez & Vinoodh, and Mert & Marcus. To add to his accomplishments, last week, Katie Grand tapped him to become Love‘s fashion director-at-large. Here, Yiapanis talks to Style.com about the new gig, the state of fashion, and staying true to his look.

Why did now feel like the right time to join a magazine?
I feel like I’ve come full circle in terms of what I do. I’ve kind of been nomadic, which is putting it nicely. I’ve been a gypsy, going from one magazine to another. I feel like I’m back to where I was aesthetically when I first started out in terms of what I want to say, so having this position now gives me a new way of conveying that message. When I first started out, a lot of what I did was very personal and I had evolved away from doing that. People would say, “Well, maybe that’s a little too creative for us,” so I started to clean up what I did, which didn ‘t work for me. I’m happier doing what I enjoy, so it felt right to go back to my messier aesthetic.

How do you balance art and commerciality?
I don’t think you have to. I always argue that the best results are when both of them are at their height. I always yap about the nineties, when brands were willing to put out campaigns that captured the spirit of the brand as opposed to the product. That seems to have gotten lost somewhere along the way. So I don’t think creativity and commercialism are mutually exclusive. I honestly think they’re best when they both collide. But that doesn’t seem to be a thought that’s shared widely right now.

Your aesthetic is usually described as dark and moody. Do you feel that’s accurate?
It’s funny because when the Love announcement was made, I saw this tweet that said, “Love just got darker.” And I don’t know if that’s necessarily true; maybe I just got a bit brighter. There is a darkness to what I do, but it’s never macabre or unpleasant and I always try to adapt to the situation. The clients I’ve worked with vary from pure brands like Calvin to flashy brands like Cavalli. And I enjoy that diversity. I enjoy sitting in a room full of embroidery and fur and gold trimmings one day, and then going into a different setting the following day where it’s all about stripping things away. Love is a very positive publication. So on the one hand, it kind of works to go against that and give it another voice, but at the same time, I’m not going in there to paint the walls black. Continue Reading “Back to the Dark Side: Panos Yiapanis on Love and His Creative Evolution” »

Fashion’s Figures: Then And Now

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What determines the feminine ideal? Mannequin—Le corps de la mode (“Model: The Body of Fashion”), the latest of Paris’ Musée Galliera’s off-site exhibitions, aims to find an answer. The show, which runs from February 16 through May 19, examines why trends like wasp waists, swan necks, or 5′ 11″ frames (à la Karlie Kloss) have driven women’s aesthetic aspirations since the first models replaced store mannequins in late-nineteenth-century Paris.

Curator Sylvie Lécallier sifted through fashion magazine illustrations, photographs, and videos to chart the jump from one fashionable body type to the next: the twenties knock-kneed flappers, the sixties childlike Courrèges girls “sans hips, waists, or breasts,” the eighties power women who were captured in Helmut Newton’s “Big Nudes,” and beyond. The show includes photos of the earliest It girls, like a series of Nelly Martyl, a star of Paris’ Opéra Comique in the 1910s. She was one of the first stars to be featured as a model in the era’s top fashion magazines. Also on display are iconic images like Corinne Day’s 1990 shot of a topless Kate Moss, Juergen Teller’s 1996 photo of a nude Kristen McMenamy (she has “Versace” painted on her chest inside a red heart), dark surreal works by Guy Bourdin, and more. Continue Reading “Fashion’s Figures: Then And Now” »

Fashion’s Bodies, Real And Fake, Get Their Night At The Museum

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In French, mannequin is used to describe flesh-and-blood models; in English, it means the artificial dummies used to display clothes. Rarely do the two mannequins exist side by side—except in Kim Cattrall eighties hits—but they will in an upcoming exhibition at the Les Docks space of Paris’ Musée Galliera, Mannequin—Le corps de la mode (“Model: The Body of Fashion”). The exhibition traces the development of the model throughout time, much as the Costume Institute’s 2009 show, “The Model as Muse,” did, and includes both physical mannequins (in the English sense) and photographs by Horst P. Horst, Juergen Teller, Corinne Day, and Nick Knight—and some line-straddlers, like the photo by Guy Bourdin above. She’s alive!

Photo: Guy Bourdin / WWD

Kate On Kate

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If modeling has a G.O.A.T., it’s got to be Kate the Great—and without much competition. It’s hard to imagine most other models earning a full tome dedicated to their greatest hits; Moss’ comes out from Rizzoli next month, designed by Fabien Baron and with text by Jefferson Hack and Jess Hallett. Above, an exclusive shot of Kate clutching Kate. She’s got the Testino cover in her mits—shot in Arles in 1996—but it’s only one of eight possible versions. The others, below, include shots by (left to right, top to bottom) Craig McDean, Inez & Vinoodh, David Sims, Corinne Day, Juergen Teller, Mario Sorrenti, and Mert & Marcus.

Photos: Ally Landale; Courtesy of Rizzoli