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July 13 2014

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7 posts tagged "Costume Institute"

Mohawks At The Met

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The Met’s Costume Institute has moved on from Prada to punk for its annual spring exhibition. This morning, Punk: Chaos to Couture was announced as 2013′s exhibition, opening to the public May 9 and focusing on the origins of punk and its impact on high fashion today. Costume Institute curator Andrew Bolton tells WWD, “Punk broke all rules when it came to fashion, and everything became possible after punk. Its impact on high fashion became so enormous, and continues at the same time.” The exhibition will feature roughly 100 men’s and women’s designs, from a large group of participating designers including Marc Jacobs, Alexander Wang, and Azzedine Alaïa, juxtaposed with original mid-seventies punk pieces in gallery sections like “Rebel Heroes” and “Pavilions of Anarchy and Elegance.” As for the annual accompanying benefit, the date has been set for May 6 with Rooney Mara, Lauren Santo Domingo, and Riccardo Tisci all serving as co-chairs with Anna Wintour. Photographer Nick Knight, who is serving as the exhibition’s creative consultant, will head up the gala’s look with Raul Avila.

Chic In The Twenty-First Century

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Around the Style.com offices and among most fashion circles, being described as “chic” might be the ultimate compliment. But what does the term really mean these days? As part of the Met’s ongoing “Good Taste/Bad Taste: The Evolution of Contemporary Chic” discussion series, 16-year-old blogger Tavi Gevinson (pictured, left) and 90-year-old style icon Iris Apfel (pictured, right) took a stab at defining it in their own terms yesterday afternoon. The word itself was used sparsely during the hour-long conversation, which was moderated by New York writer Judith Thurman. Instead the teen wunderkind blogger and the self-described “geriatric starlet” approached the concept by offering their thoughts on personal style, fashion as performance art, and fashion’s evolving concept of beauty.

Step number one to becoming fashion’s latest pop star: “It’s important not to give a damn about what anyone else thinks,” offered Apfel. “Personal style is something you have to evolve for yourself, and trying to find out who you are is like putting yourself on a psychiatric couch.” And sometimes, as Gevinson pointed out, fashion is about creating a persona because you don’t always want to be yourself. “It’s true, good fashion is good performance art,” said Apfel. And oftentimes, those characters they assume aren’t about being aesthetically pleasing. “Sometimes, I don’t care about being attractive,” said Gevinson, referring to the Rei Kawakubo or the Alexander McQueen school of fashion, where the unconventional silhouettes aren’t often intended to make their wearers look beautiful in the standard sense of the word. To that point, Apfel disagreed: “The first object is that it’s practical. I see no sense to pay a fortune and end up looming like a freak,” she said. “Having bumps all over is not the loveliest look. I can look ugly on my own and it won’t cost me a penny.”

Both of them, with perhaps equally quirky styles of dressing, were eager to discuss alternative beauty and defining it for oneself. “I was probably the oldest living broad that was allowed to be the face of a cosmetic company [with MAC]. I think things are changing and there is an undercover revolution that will break out pretty soon,” said Apfel. “Why be stopped because of number?” At that, the audience showed its approval with a big round of applause. Although the two speakers have decades separating them, it was certainly a cry that Gevinson could understand from the opposite end of the age spectrum. At 16, she hasn’t let her young age stop her from catching the attention of some fashion’s highest powers. “Iris has been the subject of many exhibition and you are a little young for a retrospective just yet, but it appears you are certainly on your way,” said Thurman. “If you were asked to do a Costume Institute exhibit, what would it be?” Gevinson’s response: “I am a big fan of the blog Advanced Style and I would like to do something celebrating getting older—women are so upset about that these days.” For her part, Apfel was ready to sign on the dotted line. Is 90 the new 20?

Photo: Rookie Mag

Karl And His Body Double, And More of Today’s Top Stories

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Karl Lagerfeld got waxed. Germany’s oldest waxwork museum, Panoptikum Hamburg, is paying tribute to their nation’s finest, Lagerfeld included, by turning them into eccentric wax figures. Lagerfeld’s was unveiled to the public last week (pictured), interestingly placed between Pope Benedict XVI and the German prostitute Domenica. [Telegraph]

Jennifer Lopez has a new man: Zuhair Murad. The pop singer has tapped the Beirut-based designer to create looks for her summer concert tour, including a feathered skirt, a body suit, and several short dresses. This is not the first time Lopez and Murad have worked together—the singer wore one of Murad’s gown to the 2011 Met Gala and the Academy Awards. [WWD]

Could Michael Jackson be the subject of the Met’s Costume Institute exhibition in 2014? Sources say maybe. The exhibit has the potential to be a hit, since Jackson was known for his iconic costumes, including Swarovski-encrusted gloves and looks from Balmain, Tom Ford, and Givenchy. [Hintmag.com]

The collaboration between H&M and Maison Martin Margiela has been confirmed. The Paris-based design house will produce a one-off collection that will go on sale November 15. “This collaboration will be a great and memorable fashion moment,” said H&M creative director Margareta van den Bosch. [WWD]

The wild things are descending upon Soho. The author of the children’s classic Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak, is the subject of a retrospective on display through September 3. The collection on view includes several of the author’s stories from the Little Bear series to his The Nutcracker drawings. [Art Info]

 

 

 

Photo: Courtesy of Panoptikum

 

Fashion’s Nights (And Days) At The Museum

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When we set out to tell the story of 2011 by the numbers, one loomed especially large: 661,509, the record-breaking number of visitors who lined up, often for hours at a time, to see the Costume Institute’s Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (left) at the Met.

But it wasn’t just a banner year for the Met and the late, great McQueen; designers and museums forged a strong bond this year, one that looks likely to continue well into the next. Museums across the globe invited designers into their halls and the results have made for some of the best exhibitions in memory.

During Couture week, Hussein Chalayan opened a retrospective at Paris’ Musée des Arts Decoratifs, where next year, Marc Jacobs and his work for Louis Vuitton will take up residence. The City of Light also played host to Ralph Lauren and his collection of automobiles (it also now boasts an enormous new RL store and restaurant, one of the town’s new favorite spots for burgers). And Florence is the new home of the Museo Gucci, opened during Milan’s Spring 2012 week with all due fanfare, and a Blondie performance to boot.

In America, socials flocked to San Francisco for the opening of Balenciaga and Spain (which also traveled to New York) and to Dallas for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier, which debuted earlier this year at Montreal’s Museum of Fine Arts. Just this month, Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte opened RODARTE: Fra Angelico, a show of the dresses their created for their June presentation at Pitti, at L.A.’s LACMA.

Farther afield, Dior went to Russia, where house jewelry designer Camille Micelli sent us this postcard, for Inspiration Dior, attended, naturally, by a lavish party. And the Netherlands continues to be a slightly off-the-radar destination for fashion’s cultural tourists. A retrospective of the work of Azzedine Alaïa is now on view in Gronningen, outside Amsterdam, and the capital’s contemporary-photo museum, FOAM, which hosted the likes of Jefferson Hack for a panel on What’s Next, which followed a retrospective of work by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin—one which eventually became the germ of their new career-spanning anthology, Pretty Much Everything.

Here in New York, the more traditional homes of fashion, like FIT’s Fashion Museum, were busy, too. The museum recently opened the first part of The Great Designers, including Armani, Dior, Givenchy, and McQueen, and plans to open part two in March. Chief curator and museum director Valerie Steele also worked with clotheshorse and collector Daphne Guinness on an exhibition of her own holdings—which, it turns out, Guinness keeps organized via computer database.

Next year, all eyes will be on Miuccia Prada for the next Costume Institute exhibition, Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada on Fashion. But before then, there’s a Louboutin retrospective in London to look forward to, on the heels of the shoemaker’s victory-lap 20th anniversary year. And WWD reports today that several fashion labels are taking a renewed interest in their own histories, too. Balmain is ramping up its archival holdings, and Chloé recently brought on an in-house archivist, in anticipation of a retrospective planned for its 60th anniversary next year.

Photo: Courtesy of the Costume Insitute

Savage Beauty Comes To Tinseltown

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The Costume Institute’s Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty is currently drawing thronging crowds in New York (so much so that its run has already been extended), but its reach doesn’t stop there. Last night in Los Angeles, Friends of the Costume Institute Cameron Silver and Susan Casden hosted a dinner in honor of the exhibition and its curator, Andrew Bolton. Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, Peggy Moffitt, James Galanos, and Kimberly Brooks all came to raise a glass. So did actress Perrey Reeves, despite running on fumes after a day that began at 4 a.m. (She’s been filming the final season of Entourage.) “I can’t even begin to think about it,” she laughed. “But I adore Cameron.”

L.A. is known for its laid-back style, but the guests knew that where McQueen is concerned, casual wasn’t going to cut it. “Thank you all for dressing up for the chicest night in L.A.,” Silver said. (He, Casden, and several of their guests donned looks by the late designer.) “This is really becoming one of my favorite events of the year,” Bolton chimed in. “The exhibition has been such a heartwarming experience and I love seeing so many of the women tonight in his designs.” Those same women got their hands on a few more, thanks to the Savage Beauty exhibition catalog, and Bolton gamely signed them for any interested party.

Photo: Andreas Branch / Patrick McMullan