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8 posts tagged "CR Fashion Book"

Exclusive: Keeping Up With CR

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CR Fashion Book

Fun fact: Carine Roitfeld’s favorite fairy tale is E.T. “It’s not a traditional fairy tale, but I love E.T. because it combines science fiction and fantasy with a touch of sadness. All of the best fairy tales have that—something dark with something light,” the editor told Style.com. Why on earth would we be speaking with Mlle. Roitfeld about extraterrestrial eighties flicks, you ask? Because “fairy tales” happens to be the concept behind the latest edition of CR Fashion Book, which hits newsstands on February 25.

Considering Roitfeld has facilitated a few fashion Cinderella stories since launching her zine in 2012, “fairy tales” seems a fitting theme for issue four. The editor’s choice to put Kim Kardashian on the cover of issue three helped convince the industry’s elite to (kind of) embrace the reality-TV star. And Kate Upton’s issue one cover made readers recognize that she could be an all-American bombshell and a high-fashion model, too. (For the record, a Brigitte Niedermair pointe shoe and Ukrainian ballet dancer Sergei Polunin covered issue two, but that’s not terribly pertinent here.) Roitfeld’s latest princess-in-the-making? Nineteen-year-old Gigi Hadid, whose Bruce Weber-lensed cover (right) debut exclusively here, alongside a second E.T. themed cover featuring Lindsey Wixson, shot by Sebastian Faena (left). “Gigi is next in the line of athletic, voluptuous babes who transition to high-fashion success,” said CR Fashion Book design director Stephen Gan. Not unlike Kim K., Hadid also happens to be on reality TV—she’s best known for her role on Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills (as a daughter, not a housewife). “It may be a cliché, but this is a girl who lights up a room. When I met her, I immediately sensed her star quality—it was only days later that I found out she was already a reality-TV star,” Gan continued. Did we ever in a million years think Roitfeld would fall for not one, but two reality darlings in the span of six months? No. But we’re inclined to trust her judgment. After all, she did introduce the world to Lara Stone.

Photos: Sebastian Faena, Bruce Weber

North West Gets Dressed

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Givenchy babyKimYe naysayers take heed. Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, who showed face (but not the bedazzled kind) front row at Riccardo Tisci’s Spring Givenchy show, seem to have garnered some fashion clout (Klout?). Thanks to some combination of Kanye’s early embrace of Tisci’s collections, his recent capsule for A.P.C., and the Alexander Wang name-drop in his new album, as well as Kim’s surprising Givenchy-clad appearance at this year’s Met Gala and her grill-toothed CR Fashion Book cover, have caught the attention of the fashion industry’s elite. And Kim’s recent take to Instagram is a sure sign that baby North West will follow in Mommy and Daddy’s footsteps. Earlier this morning, the seasoned selfie snapper revealed photos of Nori’s new custom clothing, designed and gifted by Phoebe Philo, Maison Martin Margiela, Alber Elbaz, Alexander Wang, and Riccardo Tisci. Fast-forward to street-style shots starring North West, Blue Ivy, and Alai Wang.

Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book

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Carine Roitfeld

If Carine Roitfeld has proven anything in her three decades in the fashion game, it’s that she’s a master of reinvention—of both herself and others. All one needs to do is look at her latest CR Fashion Book cover—which features reality-TV-star-turned-quasi-fashion-world fascination Kim Kardashian showing off a gilded grill—to see that. The editor, stylist, and consultant, who left her decade-long post as editor in chief of Paris Vogue in 2011 only to launch her abovementioned biannual publication to much fanfare in New York a year later, is the subject of Fabien Constant’s new documentary, Mademoiselle C. The film, which debuted in New York last night, chronicles the making of the inaugural issue of Roitfeld’s magazine and offers an intimate look into the life of the editor. “I was very surprised when I saw the film for the first time,” Roitfeld told us, donning a youthful Céline crop top and Miu Miu denim skirt. “I didn’t imagine it would be so personal. You see everything—my family, my kids, my husband, my apartment, my [dance] lessons, and this was very difficult.” We have to say, though, it was refreshing to see the editor—who’s famed for working with everyone from Karl Lagerfeld and Tom Ford to Bruce Weber and Mario Testino—behave so candidly in front of the camera. Style.com caught up with Roitfeld prior to the film’s premiere to talk life after Vogue, Nicolas Ghesquière, the future of fashion, and what it means to be sexy.

Before I turned on my recorder, you were talking about how much you admire Coco Chanel. Why is that?
She came back to work at almost 70 years old, and she came back as a success, and America was the first country to welcome her. France didn’t. They always say, you’re never a king or a queen in your own country.

Is that why you came to New York to launch CR Fashion Book? Do you feel like the Americans made you a “queen”?
I think America was very nice with me, because the day I finished Paris Vogue, I immediately got a phone call from America. Once you’re in New York, you jump. Paris is mostly retired people—I love it, and it’s a beautiful city, but it’s quite slow. In New York, you can do anything—you can shoot on Sundays, you can shoot at night, you can get a pink dog, everything you want is possible. It’s like Jay-Z’s song about the Big Apple—you never stop.

Do you miss being the editor in chief of Paris Vogue?
No. I still like the title. I think it’s a magical title, and there was a Vogue before me, there will be a Vogue after me. I have no regrets. Ten years is quite long. Otherwise, you stay forever, and you settle into office life, and I don’t like office life. It’s difficult to do things on your own, but I think it’s very exciting, and everyone says, oh, you look younger than before, and it’s just because I’m learning more.

Do you think that Emmanuelle Alt is taking Paris Vogue in the right direction?
I will not look at it. It’s her thing. It’s totally different. I don’t want to compare and I don’t want to judge. I’m over this now, you know? I do my own thing, and it takes me enough time, enough energy, I’m not here to criticize. I don’t care. I have so many projects—I’ve become a cover girl and a grandma at the same time. I have so many exciting things in my life. I don’t need to look back.

Before you launched CR Fashion Book, there were rumors that you weren’t on the best of terms with Nicolas Ghesquière. What’s your relationship like with him now?
This is the bullshit of politics in fashion. I’ve never had a problem with Nicolas. I just sent him a text and said, “I miss you!” I’ve known him since the very beginning. I think he’s the most talented person in fashion. He’s very, very smart. I’m sure he’s coming back, and I hope it’s very soon, because we miss him. And I think he’s going to surprise everyone. There are not so many big talents today, and he’s one of them.

Inevitably, Mademoiselle C is going to be compared to The September Issue, and you to Anna Wintour. How do you feel about being compared to her?
I was compared to Anna for many years. But I worked with her. I was working for her, and I think she’s a very tough woman, but she’s very honest. She’s a hard worker, and she and Grace [Coddington] have a lot of passion. And you feel passion in Mademoiselle C, too. Totally different, though. Vogue is the biggest magazine in the world; they have a lot of money. For our first issue, we had four people doing the magazine, but we have the same passion. Continue Reading “Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book” »

Designer Diary: Daniel Vosovic’s Postcard from Istanbul

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As a member of the CFDA’s Fashion Incubator program, Daniel Vosovic was sent on an inspiration trip to Istanbul. Here, he shares the details of his Turkish getaway with Style.com.

After presenting my Fall 2013 collection in New York in February, I took a break from my design studio and headed off to Istanbul to discover all of Turkey’s delights (and, hopefully, to find inspiration for Spring 2014). Having never been to Istanbul, I had no idea what to expect, but I was pleasantly surprised. I was joined by my boyfriend Kieran, the CFDA’s Johanna Stout and her boyfriend Stewart, and CR Fashion Book online editor (and Style.com alum) Kristin Tice Studeman. With the W Istanbul Hotel as our base camp, we began each day savoring the country’s specialties, like dates and Turkish coffee. Afterward, we would explore the city’s breathtaking landmarks, like the Blue Mosque and the Hagia Sophia, and admire the unmatched talents of local artisans. What I treasured most, however, were the little moments spent with local shop owners, who taught me about the making of a Turkish rug, or wandering on to one of the hundreds of crooked side streets in search of an adventure.

A lesson for Istanbul: Always look up. Some of the most incredible artwork is on the ceiling.

Searching for Turkish delights—tea and more—at the bustling Spice Market. Continue Reading “Designer Diary: Daniel Vosovic’s Postcard from Istanbul” »

On Our Radar: Subversive Logo Tees From C.O.I. NYC

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There are a-ha moments and then there are “Ah ha!” moments. One of the latter occurred when Tommy Ton snapped CR Fashion Book editor Shiona Turini wearing a cheeky logo tee that read “Ballinciaga” during London fashion week. No, Nicolas Ghesquière’s spell checkers didn’t take the day off. The ironic shirt was from Conflict of Interest (or C.O.I. NYC), a new label launched in September, which also offers other conversation-starting tops branded “Giraunchy” and “Bodega Vendetta.” There’s a cool backstory, too. According to its founders, who work in the industry and prefer to remain anonymous for now due to a “conflict of interest” with their other jobs, the line models itself after a fictitious government agency that raids warehouses, seizes unlicensed designer goods, and re-releases them to the public in actual tamper-proof evidence bags. “We have hilarious conversations with our friends in fashion and often use a lot of wordplay when referring to what each might be wearing,” explained one of C.O.I.’s incognito agents. “We are definitely fans of the labels we parody, and if we don’t love the original house, designer, or logo, we don’t touch it. Our objective is to create a dialogue on fashion iconography and imagery.” When the Tommy Ton photo posted, it quickly became a viral hit, and C.O.I. reportedly saw an immediate spike in sales. In the near future, C.O.I. will be putting out slightly larger collections including limited-edition hats and sweatshirts and is also in talks with some companies to do collaborative subversions of their own logos. So what’s next—Narcissus Rodriguez, Mary Katranzoo? You’ll have to stay tuned to find out.

C.O.I. shirts ($60 each) are sold on Coi-NYC.com and at VFILES, 12 Mercer St., NYC.

Photo: Tommy Ton