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July 31 2014

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18 posts tagged "Craig McDean"

With Help from Grandma, Liv Tyler Minds Her Modern Manners

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Dorothea Johnson, Liv TylerRules were meant to be broken. At least they were last night at Liv Tyler and her grandmother Dorothea Johnson’s holiday fete at Stella McCartney’s New York flagship, where they celebrated their new book on manners. “This blasts through any etiquette whatsoever!” exclaimed Tyler, pointing to her own late arrival and last-minute primping as the ultimate party “don’t.” However, handling life’s hiccups with grace is one tip offered in Modern Manners: Tools to Take You to the Top, which Johnson, etiquette expert extraordinaire, aptly called “a pick up and put down book.”

Holiday revelers including Alexandra Richards, Craig McDean, and Charlotte Ronson turned out to toast the tome. Noticeably absent was McCartney herself. (She’s in London gearing up for her annual Christmas lighting this evening.) But given the designer’s “impeccable manners,” attested Tyler, and the pair’s long-standing friendship, the choice in venue was not a surprising one.

On hand were delightful butternut squash bites and vodka rosemary cocktails, served by waiters in reindeer antlers and flashing Santa pins. Singing a range of holiday classics, an a cappella group later serenaded Tyler with “I Only Have Eyes for You,” only to have the McCartney-clad star join in.

Hoping to sample some cotton candy from the “Dos and Don’ts” sweets table at the back of the store was Hanneli Mustaparta. “I can’t reach; my skirt’s too short!” she exclaimed while leaning over some “Don’t raise your voice” cookies. While keeping her thigh-grazing frock modestly at bay, the rule breaker eventually managed to pluck some cotton candy from the jar.

Modern Manners: Tools to Take You to the Top is published by Random House and available at select bookstores as well as at Stella McCartney’s Greene Street store.

Photo: BFAnyc.com

Life In The Fast Lane

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Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Bruhl

Yesterday was not a slow Wednesday night at Chelsea Bow Tie Cinemas. The Cinema Society screened Ron Howard’s high-octane new racing film, Rush, for an audience that included Courtney Love, Richard Phillips, and Craig McDean. Safe to say the speed freaks left feeling pretty satisfied.

Having debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival, Rush seems on track to please Formula 1 wonks and general audiences alike. It dramatizes one of the great rivalries in the history of motor sport, between a pair of seventies-era drivers—a fun-loving Briton and a calculating Austrian—played by Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Brühl. The evening was co-sponsored by Piaget and Ferrari (the latter of which inevitably ends up getting plenty of screen time) and wrapped up with an after-party at Hôtel Americano.

Hemsworth’s character, James Hunt, was a scintillating pop icon in his day. “He was the first Englishman that I remember considering attractive,” screenwriter Peter Morgan recalled, adding that he and Howard cast a wide net before landing their Australian leading man. “There wasn’t a sexy enough Englishman to play James Hunt.”

And indeed, his story is a remarkable one. Hemsworth, who lost thirty pounds of Avengers bulk in order to fit into an F1 car, figured it would be hard for spectators to look away. “Anything thrilling or adrenaline-driven like this, where there’s a huge amount of risk involved…you’re forced to pay attention and even, I think, to watch someone participate in that,” he mused. Then again, some viewers might be just as drawn to the sex scenes, for which Hemsworth drops his trousers more than once—something he confessed was “more daunting than the racing, to be honest.”

Photos: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Talks Image-Making in the Digital Age

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Matin Zad

Stylist Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele knows a thing or two about fashion imagery. You know all those photographs from the late eighties and nineties of supermodels like Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Claudia Schiffer decked out in Versace, Chanel, and piles upon piles of gilded baubles? Well, we have her to thank for those.

De Dudzeele’s reputation for creating vivacious, lasting images is undoubtedly one of the reasons Bottega Veneta tapped her to sit on the judging panel of its 2013 New Exposure Photography Competition (she’s joined by heavy hitters such as Craig McDean, Guido Palau, Andrew Bolton, and Bottega’s own Tomas Maier). Launched last year in an effort to discover and support emerging talents, the competition features five standout finalists this year. And tonight, at New York’s Openhouse Gallery, Collin Kelly, Emma Powell, Masha Sardari, Matin Zad, or Shae DeTar will be announced as the 2013 victor. The finalists’ photographs debut here. And below, in between shoots and shows, de Dudzeele weighs in on photography in the digital age, discusses the overuse of Photoshop, and offers aspiring image-makers some invaluable advice.

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How has the process of image-making changed throughout the course of your career? And what’s remained the same?

Good ones are good ones! The talented people will still stay the same—they have it in their [guts]. What’s changed is that the focus on set has gone from looking at the subject…to looking at a monitor. Nowadays, people sometimes forget to have fun and to have their own point of view. Fashion photography still has, and needs a lot of, original ideas. The digital is just a tool.

What qualities do you feel make a successful image in this digital age?

Energy, capturing a moment, composition, authenticity, creativity!

What traits did you look for while judging the Bottega competition?

I was looking for a personal eye, a unique image, a sensitivity, and honesty… not a reproduction of something done before.

Is there anything you miss about a more classic approach to photography? And, conversely, is there anything you really love about images?

I miss the happy surprise! I miss the focus on the subject and the attention to details. It used to be that nothing could get “removed” or fixed afterwards. When you had it, you knew it. Digital is good to build a story, as you can work on layout and cropping, then. Technology can help a bad photographer get better, but ultimately, good photography does not need to be reworked.

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Is Photoshop used too much today? When do you feel it’s appropriate?

Yes! Moving around the filter and switching heads, hands, arms, everything, this is not the essence of a unique photograph. This is not real talent. Photoshopping is appropriate to enhance a beauty that’s already there—to help the dream come true.

Have your aesthetic values changed since the digital embrace?
My aesthetic has not changed. I love the girls, the fashion, the joy, the energy, and the ideas. Creating fun, iconic images still is the goal.

What advice would you give to emerging image-makers, whether they’re stylists or photographers, today?
Be you! Don’t over-reference. And love it! Sometimes, what people think is bad…is good.

Is there anything you’d like to add?
It’s only fashion!

Photos: Matin Zad, Emma Powell, Collin Kelly, Shat DeTar, Masha Sardari

Rollinson Rising

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Sam Rollinson in J Brand's Fall '13 campaign

Sam Rollinson stormed onto the scene in 2010, after Burberry cast her in its Fall ad campaign. Since, it’s been nothing but up for the model. Last season alone she walked in a total of sixty-two shows, and today we can reveal that Rollinson is the face of J Brand‘s Fall ’13 campaign. Shot by Craig McDean and styled by Karl Templer, the images (which debut here, above, and below) are sleek, severe, and pared down—allowing the label’s dark denim, leather jackets, and track pants, as well as Rollinson and, of course, her razor-sharp cheekbones, to pop. The model also stars in the campaign for the Little Black Jean collection—J Brand’s new range, which, launching this June, was created exclusively for Selfridges’ new Denim Studio. The Fall ’13 ads will hit magazines this August. Continue Reading “Rollinson Rising” »

Peter Lindbergh Shoots The CFDA’s Big Book

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Tim Blanks by Peter Lindbergh

The CFDA Awards—in all their glittery glory—are set for June 3 (tune in on June 4 to see our broadcast). Each year, the Council compiles a mega-watt journal, including portraits of and information on all the nominees and honorees, which is handed out to guests at the event. Last year, Craig McDean had the honor of shooting the portfolio, and for 2013, the CFDA and the journal’s art director, Trey Laird, tapped Peter Lindbergh to lens the 150-page tome (the book was styled by Vanity Fair‘s Jessica Diehl and written by Max Berlinger). Here, black-and-white snaps of honorees Riccardo Tisci, Vera Wang, and Oscar de la Renta make their exclusive debut (below), as does a portrait of our very own Tim Blanks (above), who, having been named the Eugenia Sheppard Media Award honoree, is featured today on Style.com in an in-depth interview with our deputy editor, Matthew Schneier. To celebrate Blanks’ win, the likes of Raf Simons, Mary Katrantzou, Dries Van Noten, Thom Browne, and more came together to talk all things Tim in our exclusive video, A Change in Perspective.

Very Wang, Riccardo Tisci and Oscar de la Renta by Peter Lindbergh