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July 26 2014

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9 posts tagged "Dan Colen"

Finally, The Doctor Prescribes M&Ms

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Don’t let Raquel’s expression fool you—art is uplifting. That, in a nutshell, is the guiding principle behind RxArt, the nonprofit that works to install artworks in hospitals and healthcare facilities. To that end, the group is having its 12th anniversary benefit in New York Monday night, honoring Dan Colen, who is about to undertake a major installation at Brooklyn’s Kings County Hospital pediatrics unit. (Given the setting, he’s trading his occasionally R-rated material for something more PG: M&Ms.) Tickets are still available for the Monday night party, where art by Colen, Terry Richardson, Inez and Vinoodh (whose photograph Freja and Raquel with Bill Clinton by Chuck Close is above), Aurel Schmidt, Marilyn Minter, and more will be on auction. You can get a jump on bidding online, but to take it home, you’ll want to be able to fend off competitors at Milk Gallery on Monday night. Even if you don’t walk away with a piece, you won’t go without reward: Each attendee can pick their own T-shirt, courtesy of Pickwick & Weller.

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit RxArt.com.

Photo: Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin

Frieze Frame

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Artist Banks Violette’s massive graphite and gloss canvas at Team Gallery’s Frieze Art Fair booth says, “I would rather be killing my family.” But Valentino, Elle Macpherson, Gwen Stefani, Daphne Guinness, Tom Ford, Courtney Love, and the other attendees at the opening of the ninth Frieze seemed happy to mingle and peruse the art instead.

Even though sales are steadily increasing after the recession, frugality has replaced fashion as a dominant theme for the work on view. There are fewer references to pop culture and luxury, and a more low-tech crafty feel from work like LuckyPDF’s live radio broadcasts, Franz West’s enormous, roughly knotted phallus sculpture at Gagosian, and Dan Colen’s massive chewing gum canvas at Peres Projects Berlin. Mark Hix’s packed on-site canteen contained “credit crunch ice cream,” a conceptually rich dessert of vanilla and chocolate scoops mixed with gold honeycomb and topped with chocolate sauce, half the price of other puddings at just £4.50.

The fair’s most popular participant, however, was an industrious red hermit crab who dutifully carried a replica of Constantin Brancusi’s serene Sleeping Muse sculpture on its back, while navigating through Pierre Huyghe’s aquarium in the Frieze Projects section. The delight this recontextualization of iconic art gave viewers was reflected in Lily Cole’s summation of the Frieze experience while at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise stand, “Fairs or galleries, I really care less about the context,” she said. “I just love looking at lots and lots of good art.”

Photo: Dave M. Benett / Getty Images

Leisure Time In L.A.

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When Chrissie Miller (the founder of Sophomore) and Erin Krause (the director of artist Donald Baechler’s studio) decided to intertwine their fashion and art backgrounds, the result was bound to be a good one.

“We both have so many friends doing the same thing as us, and I have always thought we should all come together and do something,” Miller tells Style.com. She and Krause rallied their impressive group of buddies—including Richard Prince, Nate Lowman, Ryan McGinley, Terry Richardson, Tara Subkoff, Rogan Gregory, and Charlotte Ronson—to contribute to their new creative concept shop, Arts + Leisure, set to bow in Los Angeles this week at Space 15 Twenty.

The pop-up shop is their attempt to bring a dose of New York cool to L.A. “There was a show in New York a few months ago, Greater L.A., and it made me sort of realize that there was a lot going on in L.A. that New York didn’t really know about,” says Krause, a ten-year veteran of the New York art scene. “And now I’ve sort of realized that that goes both ways,” she adds. She has pulled in the cream of the crop to show off New York’s artistic talents, with over 60 different contributors. Many of the artists created pieces specifically for the store, such as Olaf Breuning, who made “an unlimited-edition floor lamp made of paint buckets,” and Dan Colen and Nate Lowman, who collaborated on signed posters for the project. For her end, Miller brought in clothes from the likes of Proenza Schouler, Vena Cava, and Daryl K. Although the shop is only scheduled to be open through August 28, the two are thinking of taking their concept global in the near future.

“I have this idea that we would do it in another city—Paris would be great,” Miller says. “I feel so grateful that all these people have been so cool that it’s scary to think I have to ask them for a favor again.”

Arts + Leisure, August 5 through 28, at Space 15 Twenty, 1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd., L.A. For more information, visit http://arts-leisure.com/.

Photo: Erin Krause

Istanbul’s “Sense Of Opportunity And Possibility” Draws A Crowd—Including Dunst, Swinton, Ackermann, And Love

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Istanbul’s population unofficially tops 16 million. This past weekend, it felt like every single one of them owned a car—or at least was driving one. Guests at Istancool—the second Istanbul International Festival of Culture, to give it its full title—became intimately acquainted with the world through a minibus window as they negotiated the route from the Edition Hotel (seven stars! and a Snow Room!) to the various venues around the city. It was a useful education. Istanbul sits at a huge crossroads, geographically (obviously) but also conceptually. Michael Stipe, there for a presentation of his Collapse Into Now film project, went so far as to compare Istanbul’s “sense of opportunity and possibility” to the feeling New York has always given him. The project—a work in progress—has been corralling filmmakers to produce short pieces to accompany songs on the latest R.E.M. album. Liberatum offered a first view of a fast, furious, and funny film James Franco has made for “That Someone Is You,” which was the kind of coup that is critical to the festival’s success, according to Jefferson Hack, who hosted the Stipe event. (His magazine Another was the festival’s media collaborator.)

A different kind of coup was the presence of Kirsten Dunst and Tilda Swinton, both just off the plane from Cannes, where Dunst won Best Actress for Lars von Trier’s Melancholia. At 29, she has already spent more than two decades onscreen and experienced as many character-building extremes as show business can hurl at a young woman. (Lest we forgot, the heavily accented English translator of her Turkish introduction sonorously intoned, “We know her as the lover of the spiderman.”) Nevertheless, Dunst was gratifyingly, girlishly floored by her Cannes award. And she looked appropriately radiant in her Chanel couture at Istancool’s gala dinner. Continue Reading “Istanbul’s “Sense Of Opportunity And Possibility” Draws A Crowd—Including Dunst, Swinton, Ackermann, And Love” »

To Gallery Hop Or To Shop?
At Agnès B., No Need To Choose

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“It’s my relationship with New York that I am trying to show through the art,” Agnès Troublé said Friday night at her new Soho gallery-slash-boutique. “I wanted to give my friends here an homage for the pleasure we have together.”

Those friends include artists and filmmakers Harmony Korine, Ryan McGinness, Dan Colen, and the late Louise Bourgeois. A carefully curated collection of brightly colored paintings and photographs by Troublé’s friends, set to change monthly, now covers the exposed brick walls of her Howard Street store—the 246th one worldwide. Works of art by the likes of José Parlá, Rostarr, and McGinness are also available in the more wearable form of limited-edition T-shirts, sold exclusively at the boutique.

Troublé, a major collector herself, has had a longstanding love affair with both art (“since 1983 in Paris, we have [had] a little gallery in Marseille”) and fashion. On Friday, the Paris-based designer saw the marriage of her two greatest passions. “It’s my life,” she said of art. “We have been doing this in a way for a long time, but not so visible as here. It’s normal̵2finally.”

Photos: Courtesy of Agnes B