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August 28 2014

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12 posts tagged "Debbie Harry"

Michele Lamy: Adorned and Unfiltered

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Michele Lamy

“These were some of the first shoes Rick ever made when he was in Hollywood,” said Michele Lamy at the opening of Show and Tell: Calder Jewelry and Mobiles last night. Lamy—the wife and muse of Rick Owens—was referring to a pair of sky-high, heelless black platforms that she wore while effortlessly climbing the spiral staircase of Salon94‘s uptown gallery. Lamy had come into town from Paris to style the exhibition, which showcased the oft-overlooked crowns, earrings, necklaces, and cuffs (most of which are for sale through Salon94) crafted by twentieth-century sculptor and painter Alexander Calder. “I screamed when I first saw the jewelry,” professed Lamy during our interview, pulling her tattoo- and ring-covered fingers to the chest of her Comme des Garçons vest. She flashed a smile, exposing her gold and diamond teeth. “I’m such a fan of his.”

In addition to styling models for the event, Lamy enlisted artist Matthew Stone to snap Polaroids (with Andy Warhol’s camera, no less) of guests donning Calder’s creations. Furthermore, she’s working with artist Youssef Nabil on a Calder-centric photo series, which will star such characters as Debbie Harry, Cindy Sherman, Björk, Joni Mitchell, and Cher.

Although Lamy is most frequently associated with Owens, whom she met in her forties, she’s led an enthralling and utterly eccentric existence all her own. “It’s like she’s had ten lives,” said artist Carson McColl, who flew in from London for the fete with his boyfriend, Gareth Pugh. Considering she’s spent time as a cabaret dancer, an L.A. club kid, a fashion designer, a law-school student, and a stripper, he was hardly exaggerating. Here, Lamy talks to Style.com about Rick Owens’ Spring show, Calder’s work, and her taste in jewelry.

This exhibition celebrates an artist who also made jewelry. Do you think that jewelry and fashion are art?
That’s always the question! Some think art is unique pieces, and the Calder pieces are unique. If you do your own piece, it could be art. It’s very difficult to know the difference. Calder’s pieces were made by hand, and I think that makes it art. Clothing is more difficult because you have to produce more of it.

Do you think what you and Rick create is art?
I hope our life is.

Are your and Rick’s creative visions always in line? Do they ever differ?
They differ, but he always wins. If you don’t have the same aesthetic values, it’s difficult to live with somebody. If you don’t have the same political ideas or whatever, it’s fine. But if somebody says, “Oh, I like this,” you have to know what it is and feel the same way. Because he’s the designer, he’s the one at the front, and then I’m navigating. He’s the captain, but I’m pushing him.

You’re the current.
Yes.

I recently interviewed Nicola Formichetti, and he said that Rick’s Spring show “changed everything” and that he and the other designers who watched it “were all jealous of his genius.” What is your reaction to that, and how did you feel about the show?
It was extraordinary to come [to the States] after the show, because it was around Halloween and there were people who went dressed as Rick Owens steppers! I told him immediately that this was a statement. The show was such a burst of joy and emotion. Those girls rehearsed themselves. It’s what they do, and all their hearts were in it. It was a burst of humanité, générosité, and loving, and everything was fantastic. Rick said that it was so real that he’s not going to try to top this show…of course, we’ll see. You know, in New York there was a discussion about [race on the runway], and then [people said] that Rick did this show and it was the answer. But it was just a spontaneous gesture—wanting to express how you feel about yourself to the world. Continue Reading “Michele Lamy: Adorned and Unfiltered” »

Dita in 3-D

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“I can get out of a lot of things, but this dress is not one of them,” said burlesque star Dita Von Teese of the gown she donned to last night’s party at the Ace Hotel. The dress in question was the first fully articulated 3-D printed garment, which was conceptualized by designer Michael Schmidt. And the party, which drew the likes of Debbie Harry, Bob Gruen, and Andrej Pejic, served to toast its unveiling. “I was interested in finding the middle ground between the world of mathematics and the world of ephemeral beauty,” Schmidt told Style.com. The L.A.-based designer, who has crafted looks for stars like Madonna, Cher, and Lady Gaga (the latter wore his glass-bubble costume on the cover of Rolling Stone in 2009), conceived Von Teese’s frock with Fibonacci’s Golden Ratio in mind.

With the help of computational designer and architect Francis Bitonti, Schmidt used 3-D software to realize his space-age gown (think cinched waist and steroidal shoulders). The dress began as a digital rendering, which was then engineered in powdered nylon by high-tech collaborator Shapeways. “As an architect, it’s all about dealing with facades, and this was just about making a curvy one,” mused Bitonti. The body-skimming dress featured an undulating mesh silhouette of three thousand articulated joints fashioned out of layered nylon powder. As if that weren’t complicated enough, it also boasted twelve thousand Swarovski black crystals, which were painstakingly placed by hand after printing. “It’s obviously very futuristic, but I tried to retain a level of old-world glamour that was befitting of Dita,” added Schmidt. Indeed, the Blade Runner-meets-Bettie Page ensemble was worthy of the millennial pinup. “It’s superlight,” Von Teese mused later that evening after slipping into a demure Roland Mouret shift. But was it comfortable? “The only uncomfortable part is that I needed to be very cautious about how I walked. I had to make sure my heels wouldn’t get stuck in the hem.” Even in the future, glamour’s got its obstacles.

Photo: Jeff Meltz

Dior Pearl Pinball, McQueen Portrait Finds A Home, Andy Hilfiger’s Rock Shop, And More…

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This is our type of game: Dior pinball with pearls. In Arcade Couture: Mise en Dior, a video debuting on Nowness today, the game has been reimagined with a focus on the brand’s signature Mise en Dior necklace, “to show, in a light and fun way, the richness and savoir faire of Dior,” says Dior jewelry designer Camille Miceli. [Nowness]

For the first time in the U.K., a portrait of Alexander McQueen and Isabella Blow is on display at the National Portrait Gallery, thanks to financial help from McQueen and Daphne Guinness. The photo by David LaChapelle, Burning Down the House, originally appeared in a 1996 issue of Vanity Fair. [Vogue U.K.]

Andy Hilfiger is rocking and rolling a new pop-up shop into the former CBGB’s Gallery on Bowery Street today. The three-month shop, called RIFF, has everything from clothes inspired by Steven Tyler to Guns N’ Roses memorabilia. [WWD]

The latest addition to this year’s annual MOCA gala, featuring An Artist’s Life Manifesto by Marina Abramovic, is a performance by Debbie Harry. Blondie follows in the footsteps of musicians like Kanye West and Lady Gaga, who both performed at past MOCA bashes. [Hint]

Tara Subkoff Pledges Allegiance…To Downtown New York

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Would you like to have lunch on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange? Perhaps a late-night repast at Macy’s, the night before Christmas? If so, then the vibe at last night’s opening of Co-Op at the Rivington Hotel on the Lower East Side would have greatly appealed to you. Thronging is, perhaps, too gentle a word. A clublike atmosphere prevailed as Tara Subkoff, who designed the uniforms for the restaurant’s staff, hosted a dinner for a couple dozen pals, among them Chloë Sevigny, Michael Stipe, and Debbie Harry (left, whose Polaroid portrait also hangs, with those of other downtown notables, on the wall). For Subkoff, the meal may possibly mark a homecoming: As she held court with her boyfriend, King’s Speech director Tom Hooper, Subkoff revealed that they’ve been apartment-shopping in the city, and are planning to decamp from L.A. as soon as they’ve found a place. “That’s part of the reason I liked the idea of doing the uniforms,” Subkoff said. “It’s a way of showing my allegiance to downtown New York, and the Lower East Side in particular. I love it here. And I love the idea that this place is kind of amping up the glamour of the neighborhood.” The glamour quotient was certainly high last night: Besides Subkoff, fashion faces spotted amid the revelry included designers Yigal Azrouël, Katie Gallagher, and Johan Lindeberg.

Photo: Richard Koek / PatrickMcMullan.com

The Keith Haring Party Goes On

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Last night would have been Keith Haring’s 53rd birthday. The late Pop artist, alas, is no longer around to celebrate, but the Gladstone Gallery’s new show, which includes rarely seen drawings from his sketchbooks, brought out friends and family to toast his life and work. “It’s a big occasion,” said gallerist Barbara Gladstone. “His sketchbooks have never been seen…it’s a revelation, it’s really like an index. You can see what he was thinking and what he would do and what his thought process was.”

“It almost made me nostalgic for when New York was this wide open space for artists,” said Paper magazine’s Carlo McCormick, who’d known Haring in the eighties. “I have really fond memories of the energy—you’d see these rich people come from Europe in their limos and then from uptown and they’d be mixing with a bunch of really degenerate people and weaving their way through junkies. Keith’s sense of having a party was all-inclusive that way.”

So was the party in his honor, held after the opening at Del Posto: Haring’s parents and sister rubbed elbows with downtown fixtures like Debbie Harry (above, with Gladstone), artist Cory Arcangel, and Thelma Golden. The dress code? Pop-y and Haring-bright, of course. Harry chose a red and white polka-dot top, bright red leggings, and snakeskin skirt and bag for the occasion. And José Freire of TEAM Gallery (who pronounced the Haring drawings “shocking—because they’re so good”) stepped out in a landscape-printed coat by the Japanese avant-gardist Miharayasuhiro. “This is its New York debut,” he said proudly.

Keith Haring runs until July 1 at Gladstone Gallery, 530 W. 21st St., NYC, www.gladstonegallery.com.

Photos: Julian Mackler / BFAnyc.com