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April 21 2014

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7 posts tagged "Deborah Turbeville"

Paris’ Musée Galliera Gets a New Show, More Dough

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Parkinson and Clarke

Olivier Saillard has struck again. For Papier Glacé, the second exhibition he has curated at Paris’ newly renovated Musée Galliera, Saillard riffled through one hundred years of Condé Nast’s photography archives, pulling mainly from a handful of international Vogues (American, British, German, French, and Italian), to spin a selective history of fashion-as-dialogue. The 150-image show scans like a who’s who of 20th-century lensmen: Images by De Meyer, Horst, Clark (above, right), Schatzberg, Penn, Man Ray, Parkinson (above, left), Beaton, Blumenfeld, Lindbergh, Meisel, Turbeville (below), and Weber, among others, feature in the show. The snaps are accompanied by a dozen or so dresses and accessories, such as an evening coat by Doucet (1913), a Mondrian cocktail dress by Yves Saint Laurent (1965), and a red molded bustier on loan from Issey Miyake (1980).

“Fashion-related exhibitions so often tend to run chronologically, looking toward the past,” offered Paris Vogue editor Emmanuelle Alt, “whereas a magazine comes out every month, it’s life, and it’s constantly changing. [With this show] you see what each brings to the other.” Saillard concurred, noting that fashion magazines are akin to archeologists.

Turbeville

For Alt and for Paris Vogue, the eighteen months spent collaborating on Papier Glacé was far from an end in itself. Rather, it marked the beginning of a new chapter for the nearly one hundred-year-old publication, with the establishment of the Vogue Paris Fashion Fund—a new initiative that will allow the Galliera to make new acquisitions, be they photographs, garments, accessories, or beyond. Launched with a contribution of 100,000 euros, the fund will be renewed annually and receive additional backing via fundraising.

When asked for his wish list, Saillard offered names ranging from Margiela to Corinne Day, Comme des Garçons, Junya Watanabe, Iris van Herpen, and Jurgen Teller. “I am always interested in auteurs. To look at our archives, you’d think that everyone has always worn Balenciaga,” he quipped. “I plan to shop myopically: Sometimes the exceptional can be found in an ‘ordinary’ shirt.”

It’s a fair bet that spending the Galliera’s first windfall won’t be too difficult for Saillard, but new acquisitions will be kept under wraps until July 9, the night of the first Vogue Paris Fashion Fund gala event, during haute couture.

Photos: courtesy of the Musée Galliera

In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Passed in 2013

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The new year is just around the corner, but before we move on to 2014, we pause to celebrate a few of the innovators who passed away this year. Below are some of the legends to whom we say good-bye.

In Memoriam: Remembering those who passed in 2013

Ottavio and Vittorio Missoni
There’s no denying the colorful imprint that Missoni has had, and continues to leave, on Italian fashion since it was first created by Italian impresario Ottavio Missoni and his wife, Rosita, in 1958. Having contributed to the rise of Italian ready-to-wear, Ottavio, ever the patriarch, peacefully passed this May at 92, having bequeathed the reigns of the family empire to his children, Angela, Luca, and the late Vittorio, in the nineties. Vittorio, formerly the CEO of Missoni, who was credited with bringing the brand and its signature zigzag knits global, tragically disappeared, at age 58, with his partner in a plane crash off the coast of Venezuela in January of this year.
Related: Ottavio Missoni R.I.P. and Vittorio Missoni Missing Off Coast Of Venezuela

Lou Reed Lou Reed, the dark horse of rock ‘n’ roll whose artistry and lyricism profoundly influenced various generations of musicians, came into the limelight in the sixties with the Velvet Underground. Reed’s prolific work, which extended into a solo career up until the point of his death (this October, in Long Island, of liver disease at 71), grasped the attention of artists and politicians, like Andy Warhol and Czech leader Václav Havel, as well as his contemporaries, from Bob Dylan to Metallica.

Peter Kaplan
As Style.com’s editor in chief, Dirk Standen, wrote, Peter Kaplan was inimitable. Kaplan was best recognized for his editorial prowess as the single longest-standing editor (fifteen years) of The New York Observer, and he set the tone for the media industry to follow by covering the cultish intrigue of New York City’s elite, politicians, and power brokers. His extensive career, which included working at Time magazine, The New York Times, and Charlie Rose, prior to his tenure at the Observer, last saw him as the editorial director of Condé Nast’s Fairchild Fashion Group, of which Style.com is a part. Kaplan, age 59, passed of lymphoma.
Related: Peter Kaplan, R.I.P.

Lilly Pulitzer
At 81, Lilly Pulitzer Rousseau, known simply as Lilly Pulitzer, which was also the name for her fashion line of chintzy, preppy print looks prevalent in Palm Beach, Florida (her base), and abroad, passed this April. The socialite-cum-designer began creating her tropical-inspired looks in the sixties and was oft quoted as saying, “It’s always summer somewhere.”
Related: Lilly Pulitzer Dies at 81

Deborah Turbeville
Deborah Turbeville, who passed in Manhattan at 81, in October of lung cancer, was one of fashion’s great photographic legends. Having assisted the late great lensman Richard Avedon, Turbeville worked as a fit model for Claire McCardell and saw a brief editorial stint at Harper’s Bazaar, before building her creative oeuvre on a commanding yet soft aesthetic with a dark and feminine mystique. Appearing everywhere from Vogue to W to The New York Times, her work radically defined imagery in the seventies.
Related: R.I.P. Deborah Turbeville and The Image Makers: Deborah Turbeville Continue Reading “In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Passed in 2013″ »

R.I.P. Deborah Turbeville

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Bath House, Vogue 1975

News broke late last week that photographer Deborah Turbeville died in Manhattan on Thursday from lung cancer at the age of 81. Having served as a fit model for Claire McCardell and an editor at Harper’s Bazaar early in her career, Turbeville introduced a personal, heady, and refreshingly feminine aesthetic to the world of fashion photography when, with the support of Richard Avedon, she began seriously taking pictures in the 1970s. “My photographs are extremely feminine,” she said in an interview with Style.com last year. “But it doesn’t have to do with any kind of conviction on my part. It’s all instinctive and spontaneous with me. There is a certain approach that women have. They do get into some kind of inner thing more than the male photographers do.”

That approach landed her editorials in publications like Vogue, W, and The New York Times. She worked alongside icons such as Diane Arbus, Polly Mellen, and Isabella Blow and even got arrested with Bob Richardson during a shoot for Harper’s Bazaar in Texas. Her legacy will live on through her moody, sometimes controversial images, which have been inspiring editors, stylists, and fellow photographers for decades. Here, a look back at the legendary lenswoman’s most memorable shots.

Photo: Vogue 1975; Courtesy of Rizzoli

Orange You Glad

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“It’s the greatest Canadian export since Justin Bieber,” Mayor Bloomberg said of the Joe Fresh brand at its Fifth Avenue flagship launch party last night. Certainly, the chic-on-a-shoestring clothing line (think Uniqlo, with Zara’s eye on trends), with orange as its trademark color, will add some zest to NYC. Guests like Jessica Stam (pictured, right) and Tommy Ton carried felt totes in signature Joe Fresh tangelo and ate teensy macarons made of same. The juiciest slice of orange, though, belonged to the line’s designer, Joe Mimran (pictured, center): a jaunty scarf made just for himself. “It’s very limited edition,” he joked. So were (but seriously) the store-specific Joe Fresh Video Series installations directed by Ellen von Unwerth, Deborah Turbeville (below), and Sue de Beer. “I’m an art collector, and New York is the place to be for art,” said Mimran. “In coming here, we want to support the scene.”

And make a scene, too. Fifth Avenue is a long way from aisle five at the supermarket, where Joe Fresh—owned by Canadian grocery chain Loblaws—was born. Then again, Loblaws is owned by the Weston family, which also owns luxury department stores Selfridges and Holt Renfrew. Talk about a high-low mix. “Of course I wear Joe Fresh,” said Loblaw executive chairman Galen Weston, Jr., who was sporting a $70 cashmere sweater under a considerably more expensive suit. “We’re proud of the brand, and to see it open on Fifth Ave is a dream.” A tangerine dream, indeed.

Photo: Andrew H. Walker / Getty Images

The Image Makers: Deborah Turbeville

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In a new series, Style.com sits down with the best in the field of contemporary fashion photography to talk about both the process and the product. Here: Deborah Turbeville.

Considering the high romance of Deborah Turbeville’s work, it might seem odd to think of her as a little bit punk rock. But to hear the 73-year-old photographer describe her untrained, just-go-for-it DIY beginnings, comparing Turbeville to Sid Vicious doesn’t seem so far off. “There would be a strange cropping or one girl in focus and three out or a blur,” she said at a recent interview at her Upper West Side apartment. “But I would end up liking the mistakes and incorporating them into my work.” Well, and there’s also the time she got arrested in Texas with Bob Richardson, with whom she worked with regularly while a stylist at Harper’s Bazaar.

It was actually Richardson and his “cinematic” way of working that precipitated her eventual leap from fashion editor to fashion photographer in the early seventies. (She also had encouragement from Richard Avedon and Harper’s Bazaar art director Marvin Israel.) But even though she’s shot editorials for Vogue, Italian Vogue, and W and campaigns for Barneys New York, Oscar de la Renta, and Valentino—for whom she did the current Spring campaign—Turbeville still bristles at the F word of fashion. It’s one of the reasons it’s taken her so long to put out her most recent book, Deborah Turbeville: The Fashion Pictures ($85, www.rizzoliusa.com). Style.com caught up with Turbeville to talk about being Claire McCardell’s fit model, what’s so great about St. Petersburg, and the very Hollywood shoot for her new Valentino campaign.

PLUS: Click here for a slideshow of Turbeville’s work through the years, accompanied by commentary from the photographer >

Why do The Fashion Pictures now?
I have difficulty with realizing that’s what I’m supposed to do. [Laughs.] I don’t really think of myself as a fashion photographer. I’m kind of in denial about it. People kept saying, “You should do a book of fashion pictures. We’d like to see them, after all.” A friend of mine was doing books with Rizzoli, and he said, “You know, that would be a fun little airy project, to do something on my house in Mexico.” I knew I had a lot of photographs hanging about. So I made an appointment to go in to see Charles Miers, the publisher, and he said, “I’ll do the book, but would you also do a book on your fashion pictures?” And that’s how it happened.

They did a nice job. I like the scrapbook format.
Well, the book is really a way to show how my work developed. How it all started. It goes chronologically. It just shows more or less the progression of my work. It’s a bit autobiographical. And I always do that anyway, putting pictures together in a narrative way.

It’s funny, I never realized that your first job was working for Claire McCardell for three years.
Yes, I was a fit model but I also did the shows. But because I had such a long waist, it was hard for the other models to fit the clothes. In the end, she said, I’m going to fire you and hire you back as my assistant. So I was very happy. She was one of the few designers who would use a lot of European fabrics. She used incredible fabrics. She was really a Renaissance woman. She designed shoes for Capezio. She was probably the first one to put girls in flats, in ballet slippers. We all wore flats. Or we wore tiny little heels that were stacked, made out of lizard. She did jewelry, this Chanel kind of jewelry. She was like the Chanel of the United States at that point. It was an incredible learning experience. Continue Reading “The Image Makers: Deborah Turbeville” »