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August 30 2014

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1 posts tagged "Delphinarium"

Inside The Delphinarium And Max Kibardin’s White Boxes

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Far from the madding crowd at the Fortezza da Basso, Pitti Uomo’s ground zero, two accessories designers used the occasion of the fair to show their wares: one old, one new.

Delfina Delettrez created the Delphinarium, a retrospective featuring work from five of her previous collections, installed in a gallery space in the Piazza Carlo Goldoni. The menswear fair was an unlikely choice. “I hate men’s jewelry,” she confessed. “I can see a pair of cuff links, maximum.” She herself had once made a pair, but had decorated them with highlights from the female anatomy. “There is always woman in whatever I do, even in the man’s jewelry,” she said. Why show at a gathering of uomini, then? “Maybe the fact that I really like the idea of injecting such a feminine thing in a masculine context.”

In one room, pieces from her Love Is in the Hair collection revolved on the ornate wigs on which she originally showed them. The Rolling Stone collection was presented on the moving metal contraption that inspired them, too. (“It was the first collection where the setting made the collection alive,” Delettrez said. “I wanted to make jewels that could dance with the machine, in a way.”) A front room contained more recent work, from her Metalphysic collection, as well as never-before-seen pieces, including a ring that formed a woman’s face with moving pearl eyebrows and ruby lips (pictured, left). A new piece was commissioned especially for the exhibition as well: a gorgeous hand-painted cuff in the shape of a tortoise shell, one of the many animal-themed pieces in the show. A vitrine of frog jewelry also contained live, hopping frogs; one of bee-covered pieces was filled with live bees. (One escaped, and buzzed around the hall.)
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