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July 12 2014

styledotcom Fashion adopts the bike as one of its favorite accessories: stylem.ag/1oNkLel pic.twitter.com/R5Xk9cbVZ4

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50 posts tagged "Derek Lam"

Ecco Domani Toasts NYFW’s New Guard

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Lindsay Degen

New York fashion week is fast approaching, and things just got a little more exciting for three young designers. For the past thirteen years, Ecco Domani Wines of Italy has awarded a trio of $25,000 grants to up-and-coming New York brands that embrace “good taste” and “everyday style,” and today it announced its 2014 winners: Timo Weiland (designed by Timo Weiland, Alan Eckstein, and Donna Kang), DEGEN by Lindsay Degen (who, pictured left, designed some clever body stockings and socks for the 2013 Victoria’s Secret runway), and Novis by Jordana Warmflash. While the labels are each very distinct—Weiland is known for his romantic-meets-downtown style, DEGEN specializes in playful handmade knitwear, and Novis favors bold colors and vintage-inspired silhouettes—Ecco Domani sees each one as a key player in the future of fashion. If past recipients are any indication (Proenza Schouler, Derek Lam, Altuzarra, and Alexander Wang are just a few), these on-the-rise designers have a very bright future ahead.

Photo: Getty Images

Denim Gets the Designer Treatment for Spring

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Denim from ValentinoIn the streets and on Tommy Ton’s pages in the latest issue of Style.com/Print, jeans are more dressed-down than ever—shredded, distressed, and faded to a fare-thee-well. But it was a different story on the Spring runways, where polished denim ruled. At his Louis Vuitton swan song, Marc Jacobs gave dungarees a couture twist with jet-beaded pockets. Olivier Rousteing upped the ante at Balmain, trussing soft, faded chambray with major metal chains. And Joseph Altuzarra sent out tailored pieces featuring indigo prints in the style of Japan’s elaborate “boro” patchworks. Dark-rinse denim was also in the spotlight at Acne Studios, Versace, and Derek Lam. Even the Valentino designers got in on the act, whipping up a ball skirt (actually, full-leg culottes) from the stuff.

Here, a slide show of Spring’s dressed-up denim.

Shop The Look: Scaling New Hues

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Shop the Look: Blue Snake

Will the snakeskin motif ever go out of style? We don’t anticipate it happening anytime soon, especially since designers have been getting extra creative with their scaly wares. Cobalt hues and metallic finishes bring a modern edge to traditional snake prints, and on-trend shapes like slouchy sweatshirts, knee-length skirts, and oversize clutches make them essential additions to your fall wardrobe. Shop our favorite blue reptilian pieces by Kenzo, Stella McCartney, and more, below.

1. Reed Krakoff Alligator-Print Crepe and Fine-Knit Sweater, $1,190, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Kenzo Blue Reptile-Print Round Sunglasses, $275, available at ssense.com

3. Stella McCartney Oversize Patchwork Clutch, $1,055, available at saksfifthavenue.com

4. Derek Lam Fia Ankle-Strap Sandals, $795, available at shopbop.com

5. Diane von Furstenberg Paulina Python-Jacquard Skirt, $285, available at net-a-porter.com

Intarsia-gram!

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Who can resist a novelty sweater? Over the past few seasons, pullovers emblazoned with Givenchy’s snarling rottweilers and Kenzo’s tigers have become status symbols for the street-style set. Designers’ message for Fall: There is plenty more where those came from. Jeremy Scott and Raf Simons sent tongue-in-cheek intarsia knits down their runways, and Christopher Kane’s turtleneck depicting a healthy human brain electrified with ideas is destined to become a collector’s item. Others took a more classic approach. Sweaters inlaid with feminine floral motifs turned up at Billy Reid, Sister by Sibling, and Antonio Marras, while Victoria Beckham, Derek Lam, and Louise Goldin (left) stuck with graphic, geometric patterns.

Here, the best of Fall’s intarsia knits.

Christine Quinn Addresses the Fashion Set

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Cosmopolitan editor Joanna Coles invited Derek Lam, Rachel Roy, Steven Kolb, Barneys’ Mark Lee and Daniela Vitale, and about fifty other fashion insiders to lunch in the Hearst Tower to meet New York mayoral candidate Christine Quinn yesterday. By way of introduction, Coles earned a few laughs when she said, “I’d like to tell you what Christine would do as mayor, or rather, what she wouldn’t do. She would never take a picture of her crotch and send it to someone in the Midwest whom she’s never met, and then blame her computer for being hacked. I just want you to be reassured that that is not something Christine would do.” The Cosmo chief, of course, was referring to Anthony Weiner, the scandalized former congressman, who is testing the waters for a mayoral run of his own. During a long question-and-answer period, Quinn was quick to repeat an earlier statement that “whatever the next decision is for Congress member Weiner and his family, it’s a decision that they’ll have to make together, and I wish them well whatever decision they make,” and to point out that none of her rivals have the credentials that she does.

“It’s easy to criticize and issue press releases,” she said. “It’s much harder to deliver tangible results. If you look at my record, whether that’s working with the Brooklyn Navy Yard to bring more manufacturing jobs during the recession, or passing more legislation than any other City Council has to protect New York City’s tenants, or whether it’s working with the mayor to create the most comprehensive network of incubators to facilitate jobs in all different sectors, or passing the most comprehensive green building code of any city in America, I have a record of results that none of my opponents can touch.”

Quinn touched on topics such as crime reduction, the expansion of affordable housing, tourism, and public education, as well as the city’s first Design Week, scheduled for next month. “In all five boroughs, we’ll highlight 40,000-plus designers of all types,” she said. “We’re doing it, one, to say that we’re better than anywhere else, let me be perfectly clear; two, to thank the design industry; and three, hopefully to bring more attention to it, so we can bring more jobs to it.” She also got into the nitty-gritty about the Garment Center, a subject close to her audience’s heart, suggesting her Small Manufacturing Incentive Fund model might be a good fit.

As for what Quinn wore, she said, “A New York designer, Elie Tahari, an Alexis Bittar bracelet, David Yurman necklace, and earrings I bought in Sag Harbor from a guy named Lee.”

Photo: Patrick McMullan