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September 1 2014

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39 posts tagged "Diane Kruger"

Nudism Is the Latest Trend in Footwear

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TaylorIn 2012, the platform was declared dead. That wasn’t exactly the case, but simpler, single-soled pumps have indeed been on the incline. And if the red carpet is any indication, we’ve now reached the next phase of this shoe-shedding trend with the growing popularity of Stuart Weitzman’s Nudist sandal. In recent months, Stars like Shailene Woodley, Diane Kruger, Jennifer Lawrence, Taylor Schilling, and more have been spotted wearing the style, which is simple, sophisticated, and versatile. Stuart Weitzman offers them in more than 15 varieties of color, texture, and heel height, but our favorites are the leg-lengthening nude in Pan Goose Bump Nappa ($398), the Pyrite Nocturn ($398), and the Palette Python Patent. The latter are currently on sale for $199.

Nudist

Photoa: Getty Images; Courtesy Photos

The 15 Stylish Looks You Loved Most This Week

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01mWith fashion week but a month away, summer is drawing to a close for Style.com. That being said, we’re embracing the sunshine as much as possible before NYFW, namely with our Look of the Day polls. This week, we asked you to vote on your favorite minidresses, beachy braids, and even skateboards—things we will surely miss when the chill settles in. On Tuesday, we focused on feminine lace dresses in super-bright hues. Dior’s nearly-neon citrus frocks won your vote, while Elle Fanning’s embroidered orange Christopher Kane dress was a close second. Coming in third was Valentino’s striped number from Resort ’15, which would be perfect for a last-minute jaunt to Spain.

On Wednesday, we rounded up the coolest beat-the-heat summer braids. Amber Heard’s one-sided plait (which also showed off a glittering chandelier earring) won your vote and likely inspired hundreds of DIY versions. Rita Ora got in on the action with rainbow-dyed cornrows at Radio 1′s Big Weekend back in May, and Diane Kruger wore an intriguing double-braid to the premiere of The Birdge. On Friday, we found enough cool skateboarding pictures to make you reconsider your morning commute. Cara Delevingne, Binx Walton, and just about every guy on the Venice Boardwalk definitely know how to ride in style. Click here for all of the week’s winners, plus a few runners-up for additional summer inspo.

Diane Kruger Can Be Our Style Teacher Any Day

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Diane KrugerIf you’re going to take style advice from a celebrity, it may as well be Diane Kruger. The actress has topped virtually every best-dressed list known to man, and is friends with such designers as Jason Wu, Prabal Gurung, and even Karl Lagerfeld. Her unique breed of sartorial panache allows her to flawlessly transport shoulder pads into the 21st century, make crop tops look refined, and even demurely work that see-through-shirt trend. The fashion icon, who lives by the style mantra “less is more,” wore a sweet lace bra under her sheer top, allowing her lingerie to take the spotlight. And while we don’t fear the nipplehere at Style.com, not everyone can work it like Rihanna. As Kruger demonstrates, sometimes a coy teaser is saucier than the full reveal.

Via Huffington Post.

Photo: Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images

Runway to Red Carpet: Summer Motifs and Bright Whites

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062114_Runway_To_Red_Carpet_blogStars were in a sunny state of mind this week, with highlights consisting of summery motifs and fresh hues. Kiernan Shipka set the tone in a pale pink peplum Marni dress with jeweled embellishments at the Much Music Video Awards in Toronto on Sunday.

Gowns on Thursday’s Critics’ Choice Television Awards red carpet were literal interpretations of the summertime theme. Lizzy Caplan stepped out in Valentino’s Pre-Fall ’14 gown decked with colorful butterflies, while Diane Kruger chose a floral Elie Saab Spring ’14 Haute Couture number. Chloë Grace Moretz went for a less obvious form of florals, donning a black-and-white frock printed with a wire-frame digital 3-D image of a flower from Christopher Kane’s Resort ’14 science-inspired lineup at Coach’s summer party on Tuesday in New York.

Fresh summer white also seemed to be a theme this week, with several notables choosing the color for a variety of events. Michelle Dockery selected a plunging Antonio Berardi sheath for the Cartier Queen’s Cup polo final in Windsor, U.K., while recent French Open champ Maria Sharapova opted for a croc-stamped, double-breasted sheath from Antonio Berardi’s Spring ’14 runway for the WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party in London. Natalie Portman also went for the trend, choosing a silk number with a cotton basque from Dior’s latest Resort ’15 runway for the Miss Dior exhibition opening in Shanghai.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: George Pimentel / WireImage

“RuPaul Is Kind of the Ultimate Supermodel,” and More Musings From Parsons Honoree Jason Wu

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Jason Wu

With his Hugo Boss debut and thriving eponymous line, Jason Wu is having a banner year. So it comes as little surprise that the 31-year-old Taiwanese-Canadian designer is picking up the top honor at Parsons’ 2014 Fashion Benefit, which is set for tomorrow evening. Ahead of the festivities, Wu, who’s both a Parsons alum and—fun fact—a former toy designer, took time away from wrapping his forthcoming Resort collection to speak with Style.com about his secrets to success, New York fashion’s changing landscape, and his obsession with RuPaul.

Congratulations on the Parsons honor. Considering you studied at the school, do you feel you’ve come full circle?
I’ve kind of come full circle because I moved here in 2001 for my first year at Parsons. So it’s nice to go back and be a part of this new generation of the school, which has taught me a lot and done so much for me. It’s a very nice honor and I’m very proud. But I don’t think I’ve made it—at all. I think I’ve hit a nice moment in my career and it feels great to have your peers and people in your industry acknowledge your work. But that’s not to say that there’s not much more work to do.

Between your debut at Hugo Boss, the success of your own line, and now this award, it seems that you’ve really hit your stride this year.
I don’t know. I always think there’s more to do, so I never think I’ve hit my stride. I always want more and want to do more, but certainly I think it’s been a great year so far, having done two shows in New York for the first time, and then getting this award. I guess that comes with age and experience and just doing it for a while. And I guess I’m getting a little better at it.

Do people look at you differently now that you’ve become the big man at Boss?
I don’t know if I’ve knocked it out of the park yet, but I think we had a really successful first show and I guess people look at me a little more like a grown-up, a big person.

Do you feel like a grown-up?
Yeah, I feel a little older. I guess that means grown-up. Definitely achier.

Jason Wu

Your Boss show was quite the star-studded event, and Jennifer Lawrence just wore a gown from your Fall collection to the world premiere of X-Men: Days of Future Past. What role does celebrity dressing play in a designer’s success?
Having people you admire wear your clothes in a very public way is inspiring, and it’s also a great way to get your work out there. It’s a great form of advertising. But for me it’s always about quality, not quantity, and it’s about dressing the few girls that I love. I’ve always been very loyal to Diane Kruger, Reese Witherspoon, Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams, Kerry Washington—those are girls I dress over and over and over again. And you really develop a rapport and a friendship and a relationship. It goes back to the days when Givenchy and Audrey Hepburn, and Catherine Deneuve and Yves Saint Laurent, had those relationships that went [beyond commerciality]. Those were true relationships. It’s great to continue that tradition.

Can a young designer make it these days without a celebrity bump?
Everyone does it differently. There are some people who make clothes that are more appropriate for a red carpet and there are some people who don’t. I’m not sure if it’s a do-or-die situation, but you do have to seek exposure in your own way, in a way that’s right for your brand.

Jennifer LawrenceHow did you come to dress Jennifer Lawrence for her X-Men premiere? Was that a big moment for you?

Yeah. Actually, we just found out [the day before]. I had no idea. I think there’s something so incredibly human about her. That’s why people love her so much—she’s so relatable. She shows a little imperfection—which we all have—and still looks stunning.

You mentioned that people like seeing imperfection in public figures. With that in mind, people seem to like you a lot. What’s your imperfection?

My imperfection is that I’m not as perfect as people seem to think I am. There’s a sense of controlled, sophisticated ideas in my clothes that are quite neat, and I think people sometimes think I’m that, but I’m not.

Are you messy?
I’m actually not messy. I’m terrible at waking up early. I’m terrible at a lot of things. I’m terrible at technology—anything computer-oriented. And I’m terrible at making anything on time, which I’m really working on. Actually, at Parsons, I was always really late, and you can’t be late at Parsons. You really get into trouble.

You, along with Alexander Wang, Prabal Gurung, Joseph Altuzarra, etc., are part of New York’s new guard. How do you think the creative climate here is changing?
Right now, New York fashion week is at its best. We have the most young talent [succeeding] at the same time for the first time in a long, long while, and this is the first time that we’ve really been acknowledged on an international level in a long time. That has to do with the fact that our generation’s outlook is global, rather than local. If you look at Style.com, you can read that anywhere in the world. That certainly helps. Having that kind of recognition all over the world is something that is quite rare. We’re experiencing something of a moment, a movement.

Why is that, do you think?
It is, in so many ways, New York’s time. All [of the young designers] in New York come from different international backgrounds. I think that’s a very nice representation of what New York fashion is about—it’s about diversity; it’s about fresh ideas; it’s about making its own statement, because we don’t have the hundreds of years of history. We’re really still, as a whole, quite new at it.

Jason Wu Fall 14

Do you remember how you felt when you were designing your Parsons graduate collection?
It’s so funny because I went to Parsons and my major was menswear, yet I make the most fit-and-flare dresses you could possibly imagine. I guess after going to the very masculine side, I felt like I was much more comfortable in the very feminine side, and eventually the combination of the two became my work as we know it today.

Why were you initially drawn to menswear?
I always liked the idea of tailoring. I always felt making a jacket was the most difficult thing, and it is still the most difficult. Sometimes the cleanest things with the least amount of details are the most intricate.

What do fashion students need to know that isn’t necessarily taught in school?
It’s that the fashion industry isn’t by-the-books. It’s not about following one specific route, it’s about paving your own way and making it your own. That’s what makes fashion interesting—individual visions—and not one person breaks through in the same way. We all get into it slightly differently—I worked in toys first.

Speaking of toys, I read that back in the day, you did a RuPaul doll?
I worked with RuPaul once! It was a long time ago. We made a RuPaul doll and it was wildly successful and that’s how I met him. Of course, RuPaul’s Drag Race is my favorite show ever. It’s like the best show on television. RuPaul is kind of the ultimate supermodel, and I have an obsession with supermodels.

Jason Wu RuPaul

Does your former life as a toy designer ever inform your fashion designs?
Attention to detail is what links my work as a toy designer and a fashion designer. Most people say I went from dressing toy dolls to real dolls. That’s kind of the press-y version of it. But in actuality, I did everything from designing the sculptural form of the dolls to the industrialization of the molds to the manufacturing. I always knew how to create a really good product, and I think that experience primed me for this industry.

How important has business savvy been to your success?
The balance between creativity and business-savvy is something that every young designer needs to be aware of, because it’s the reality of our industry. Having that balance is something that my generation of New York designers really thinks about.

What is your advice to fashion students who want to be the next Jason Wu?
I don’t know if they do want to be the next Jason Wu! But my advice is seize every opportunity and work hard. It sounds so obvious to say that, but the glamour of the industry can get distracting sometimes, and at the end of the day it’s about the work. I work weekends all the time—there’s no such thing as overtime for me because my own time is overtime. And I don’t have any vacations, so cancel those family plans.

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com; Leandro Justen/BFANYC.com; FilmMagic; Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com; Getty Images