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August 20 2014

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141 posts tagged "Diane von Furstenberg"

DVF’s New Wingman

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Diane Von Furstenberg's Journey Of A Dress Exhibition Opening Celebration Press Conference

After a memorable fortieth anniversary show last weekend, it seems Diane von Furstenberg only gets better with age. The gold, the music, the confetti! But everyone needs a right-hand man. To assist with her ever-expanding empire, the designer has hired Michael Herz as artistic director—a brand-new role at DVF. Herz has held past positions at Bally, Iceberg, Guy Laroche, and Falke, among others, and will ensure all products remain true to the brand, reports WWD. Herz also curated Von Furstenberg’s Journey of a Dress exhibit in Los Angeles last month, so it’s safe to say he’s an expert on all things DVF.

Photo: Getty Images 

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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Hood by AirPUBLIC SCHOOL

Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne, the designers of Public School, proved that they’re worthy recipients of the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund’s top prize. They showed womenswear alongside their menswear for the first time at Milk Studios yesterday, but what I like about them is that they’re not trying to run before they can walk. Here, for both boys and girls, they stuck to their multilayered, street-meets-high fashion guns. They also had a great casting, completely un-self-conscious in its diversity. Why can’t more designers figure that out?

HOOD BY AIR

Speaking of casting, Kevin Amato, who fills the Hood by Air runway with a spectacular group of mostly nonprofessional models of every color and gender, is at the top of his game. The show was ten or so looks too long and the catwalk inside Chelsea Piers about a mile too long, but nothing could detract from the impression that this is the most exciting label in New York right now. (For more on that, see Maya Singer’s profile in the last issue of Style.com/Print.) Designer Shayne Oliver continued to find ways to breathe new life into logo sweatshirts—a neater trick than it sounds—and pushed his aesthetic forward in dynamic, multizippered outfits in leather, suede, and velvet. The finale of voguers hair-whipped the crowd into delirium. You can enjoy the energy of that, but don’t overlook how much thought and hard work Oliver is putting into honing his vision.

MANOLO BLAHNIK

From Hood to haute. Five blocks away at the Paul Kasmin Gallery, the charming designer Manolo Blahnik was showing off his charming shoes against the backdrop of four charming films directed by his friend Michael Roberts. Blahnik, indomitable despite the fact that he was nursing a sinus infection and a sprained neck, held up a shoe and offered it for inspection to Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, the stylist. It had a curtain of tasseled fringe across the instep. “Ca je deteste,” said De Dudzeele, not so much dismissing Blahnik’s work as the entire notion of tasseled fringe. Blahnik was visibly tickled by his friend’s honesty. “You need people like that,” he said. “Who tell you.” Besides, De Dudzeele’s restless eye had already fastened onto another shoe. This one she j’adored.

DINNER AT INDOCHINE

I ran home after Diane von Furstenberg’s show, a celebration of the remarkable forty-year run of her wrap dress. I caught up with some editing, and then Susan and I headed out to a dinner celebrating the appointment of Kyle Hagler as president of the New York division of Next Model Management (or, as we like to think of him, Kyle “The Cover” Hagler—the guy’s relentless in trying to place his clients on the cover of your magazine). During seventeen years at IMG, Hagler was instrumental in building the careers of Liya Kebede and Joan Smalls, among others, and has done as much as any model agent to champion diversity (though I suspect he sees it less as breaking barriers than simply erasing them). Now he gets to run the show.

On the way out, we ran into our buddy Waris Ahluwalia. “Sorry,” I said. “I think I missed your event.” He’d had a tasting for his line of teas at The Standard earlier that afternoon. “That’s OK,” Waris shot back. “It was really only meant to be for friends and family anyway.”

READ THIS REVIEW NOW

Yesterday, Tim Blanks produced and hosted three videos for us, went to a designer’s studio to report a story for the next issue of our magazine, and knocked off a couple of reviews, including this marvel of lucidity that arrived in my inbox at 2:09 a.m. That amounts to a light day for Tim.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos / InDigitalimages.com

Doin’ It Up For Diane

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2014 marks the fortieth anniversary of Diane von Furstenberg’s iconic wrap dress. Naturally, the designer is celebrating in style. Tonight in L.A., DVF will fete the opening of Journey of a Dress, an exhibition dedicated to her frock’s milestone birthday. As you can imagine, the red carpet promises to be quite a sight, so we here at Style.com will be live-streaming the soiree’s arrivals. Tune in at 11:30 to watch Von Furstenberg and co. strut their stuff outside the Wilshire May Company building, and raise a glass to forty years of the wrap dress.

It’s About the Journey: Diane von Furstenberg Looks Back

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DVF“Beautiful Diane. She understands women—as only a woman can. And she’s done something quite wonderful for us all by creating clothes that can turn on the man in your life without turning off his mother.” That was Saks Fifth Avenue talking, in an ad that ran in the Miami Herald in 1976. Forty years after she designed her first wrap dress, Diane von Furstenberg is celebrating with a milestone exhibition at L.A.’s historic Wilshire May Company building, the future home of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. DVF herself attributes her iconic dress’ success to three things: “It’s flattering. It makes you feel sexy. And it makes you feel confident.” Produced in collaboration with curator Michael Herz (formerly of Bally), production designer Stefan Beckman, and exhibition designer Bill Katz, the retrospective showcases 200 wrap dresses dating from Von Furstenberg’s first collection to “last week.” Put the old and the new side by side, as she has done in the show, and the designer says, “You can’t tell which is which.”

Journey of a Dress opens tonight. Style.com will be live-streaming the event from 11 p.m. EST. Here, Von Furstenberg reminisces about some of her favorite ad campaigns.

Click for a slideshow.

Fashion and Function: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim Talks Teaming Up With Intel

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Humberto Leon and Carol LimGoogle’s not the only company that can play the tech-meets-fashion game. Last night at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich announced the corporation’s new plan to produce functional tech accessories that are both wearable and aesthetically pleasing. Impossible? Not when you have Opening Ceremony’s Humberto Leon and Carol Lim on your team. The duo will design a smart bracelet, which, currently under development, will be unveiled at a yet-to-be-revealed date.

But one bracelet does not a revolution make, so in addition to OC, Intel has tapped Barneys (who will sell the forthcoming wristband and future products) and the CFDA (who will help emerging designers get on Intel’s wearable gadget bandwagon) to assist with the project.

Earlier today, Ayse Ildeniz, Intel’s VP of Business Development and Strategy of New Devices, hosted a panel to discuss the push. She was joined by OC’s Bettina Chin (Director of Special Projects) and Su Barber (Art Director), the CFDA’s Adam Roth (Director of Strategic Partnerships), and Barneys’ Matthew Woolsey (SVP of Digital). The takeaway from their chat? While functionality is key, the products have got to look great (if you recall, one of the biggest complaints about Google Glass, pairs of which were worn on Diane von Furstenberg’s Spring ’13 runway, was that it wasn’t exactly the sleekest thing on the block). “If wearables are to take off, it has to be an industry effort, and fashion and aesthetics have to be involved,” Ildeniz told Style.com after the panel. Woolsey concurred. “The design element is paramount to the way in which our customer engages with [the product],” he said. It’s worth noting that, through this project, Barneys will become the first luxury retailer to carry wearables.

So can Leon and Lim do for wearable tech what they did for Kenzo—that is to say, make it the cool set’s new must-have? Unfortunately, some blizzard-induced flight delays prevented Lim from attending the conference and addressing that in person. However, with a little help from a smartphone, Style.com was able to catch up with Lim about why OC and Intel are a natural fit, how she plans to make wearable tech covetable, and how her collaborative device will not only allow people to plug in, but offer them the option to turn off.

Why did you and Humberto say yes to the Intel project?
Technology in all forms has been really important to us, not only in our store and our collections, but also in terms of online retail. We had been watching the wearable technology space for quite some time before Intel approached us. We’d been thinking about how to incorporate [wearables] into our collection, so when this project came along, we thought it was a great opportunity. Intel represents such a strong force in technology, so we were happy to lend our design sensibility, and it makes sense to partner with someone whom we consider to be the expert.

Do you feel confident that the end result will resonate with the Opening Ceremony customer?
Absolutely. If you look at how people operate today, they use so many devices and applications. I think [wearable technology] is the next step in terms of how people interact. Your phone’s generally by your side, but you don’t always get a chance to look at it, so I think this product is a natural progression.

As far as stereotypes go, “fashion” people and “tech” people are about as opposite as you can get. How do you hope to bridge this perceived gap? And considering you design for Kenzo as well as Opening Ceremony, do you see wearable tech translating into luxury fashion?
When Intel approached us, they basically said, “We’re experts in technology, and we would rely on you to be experts in the field of creating an item that can stand on its own—an item that is beautiful, and that people will want.” I think that marriage of two partners with different talents is going to be very interesting. And you’re right, the fashion industry has been slow to adopt wearable technology. But I think that’s because it’s usually coming only from a technology point of view, rather than a combination of tech and design aesthetic. Our focus will be to create a covetable item that someone would want to wear regardless of the tech aspect. So I think this collaboration with Intel will stand out from other devices. Continue Reading “Fashion and Function: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim Talks Teaming Up With Intel” »