Style.com
Subscribe to Style Magazine
121 posts tagged "Dior"

Diamond Girl: Behind the Scenes of Rihanna’s World Tour Wardrobe

-------

When your world tour is called Diamonds, the wardrobe had better sparkle. Luckily, Rihanna had stylist Mel Ottenberg on hand to ensure that her looks do just that. Featuring a total of—count ‘em—seven costumes, each of which was custom made by a megawatt designer (think Riccardo Tisci, Raf Simons, Alber Elbaz, and Adam Selman—Rihanna’s River Island collaborator), the pop star’s onstage wares boast everything from holographs to “orgy” embroidery (courtesy of Givenchy, naturally). “The most amazing thing about Rihanna is what a chameleon she is,” said Ottenberg, who’s worked with Riri for two years. “She’s always up for something new. She’s fearless, she knows what she likes, and it’s fun to see which ideas she’ll jump for.”

The Diamonds lineup begins with a bespoke black Givenchy Couture cape, embroidered coat, shorts, bra, and boots, and ends with a shimmering tailor-made Lanvin jumpsuit. “Riccardo blew it out of the park,” said Ottenberg. “And Givenchy went above and beyond with the level of customization, and dealing with all the pop-world craziness.” (Adding to said craziness was the fact that the entire wardrobe had to be put together in the middle of fashion week.) “And with Lanvin, I knew that, more than anybody, [Alber] would just murder a strong sparkly look to work with the idea of Diamonds.” Each outfit, Ottenberg tells us, plays off creative director Willo Perron’s multi-themed tour concept. For instance, one section, during which Rihanna sings “Rude Boy” and “Man Down,” has a hip-hop-cum-dance-hall vibe. This is where Raf Simons’ graphic oversize T-shirt dress (which is worn with Louboutin boots and a Michael Schmidt nameplate necklace) comes in. For a more rock ‘n’ roll section, Selman created a red-and-yellow leather bra and pants ensemble that’s finished off with white Manolo Blahnik boots. “It was eighties David Lee Roth bouncing around on stage mixed with a sleek Lamborghini/Ferrari situation,” Ottenberg laughs. And Selman’s much-talked-about holographic money-print dress and coat—which Rihanna wears during a rave portion of the show—actually began with a pair of Pierre Hardy sneakers made just for the tour. “The whole thing is very Thug Life Tupac mixed with nineties candy raver,” Ottenberg explained. Forget the music (well no, don’t—it’s pretty great). Rihanna’s tour is a sartorial odyssey not to be missed.

Click for a slideshow of performance snaps and exclusive sketches by Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci, Dior’s Raf Simons, Lanvin’s Alber Elbaz, and Adam Selman.

Is India The Next Big Player in Luxury Retail?

-------

Prada is reported to be in talks for an India entry. Alexander McQueen, Dolce & Gabbana, and Stella McCartney are exploring real estate for stand-alone stores. After opening his first boutique in New Delhi last year, Christian Louboutin is readying himself for a Mumbai launch. This year marks the tenth anniversary of Louis Vuitton’s presence in India—it was the first luxury brand to set foot in the country. Is India finally reawakening to luxury? Historically, it’s a country familiar with all things luxe. After all, in 1925, India’s Sir Bhupinder Singh, the Maharaja of Patiala, granted Cartier its single largest commission: the remodeling of his crown jewels, a collection that included an exquisite 234.69-carat De Beers diamond. Vuitton’s gilded links with India go back well over a century, when the Maharajas of Jammu and Kashmir, Bikaner and Baroda, ordered customized trunks from the company.

Then came freedom. For almost forty-four years after Independence, socialist India snapped all ties with luxury. It’s only in the last decade that the romance has rekindled. And it has to do with math. With a population surpassing 1.22 billion, and 81 million households falling into the upper middle class and high-income bracket, India is a serious market for luxury players. In fact, statistics show that India is one of the fastest-growing and largest luxury markets, with sales expected to touch $15 billion by 2015—nearly double what they are today. In November last year, Gucci opened its fifth and largest India store, spanning 4,220 square feet across two floors in Gurgaon, Delhi’s satellite city. Patrizio di Marco, president and CEO, noted, “The flagship store underscores Gucci’s commitment to India. This is our fifth store in this unique country, where we have been operating directly since the end of 2009, and it is a testament to the importance that we are placing on this fast-growing and competitive market.”

But Kalyani Chawla, vice president of marketing and communications at Christian Dior, insists India is taking baby steps. And she is right. The Western notion of luxury hit Indian shores only ten years ago. It’s still a country of salwar kameezes and saris. But the Indian buyer has grown interested in fashion, investing small but precious sums in brands. “Dior has seen a steady and encouraging growth. As is the case globally with most brands, accessories are doing very well [and] clothing is picking up,” she says, noting that this is partly due to the fact that Western wear has finally slipped into a bride’s wedding trousseau. And for Indians, marriage is the occasion for which discerning buyers splurge. Dior launched in 2006, and has three stores across the country. Continue Reading “Is India The Next Big Player in Luxury Retail?” »

Dior Takes Harrods

-------

As part of a larger initiative to ring in Raf Simons’ new era of Dior, the storied French house will veritably annex Harrods in London from March 16 through April 14. Dior, whose relationship with London goes way back (Mr. Dior actually staged a show at Harrods back in 1953), will install 33 window displays, complete with Dior iterations of the London phone booth, teddy bears, and Dior-clad beefeaters. The exhibition-cum-event will also offer vintage photographs and sketches, 40 perfectly fashioned mini couture dresses, and an installation featuring gowns worn by the likes of Jennifer Lawrence, Emma Watson, and Marion Cotillard. Anyone looking to take home a piece of the action, limited-edition products like Dior cupcakes (you can buy a box of four for $29.75), a snow globe, and a Lady Dior bag (a favorite of the late Princess Diana) in tartan and crocodile, will be up for sale. And those of us who won’t be in London this month might not be completely out of luck: The house is reportedly opening additional pop-ups around the world this spring.

Photo: Photo: Bettmann / Corbis

Joie de Vivre, in 216 Pages

-------

“Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only,” Coco Chanel once said. “Fashion is in the sky, in the street. Fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.” This is the concept Bérénice Vila Baudry is going for with her new book, French Style. Out this April, the 216 page tome examines its subject from all angles. “I love fashion,” Baudry, a professor at Columbia University, told Style.com. “But fashion is the obvious thing to talk about when you think of French style. I didn’t want the book to be just about that.”

French Style is a full-blown menagerie filled with a combination of 165 obscure, albeit entertaining, tidbits (did you know French inventor Roland Moreno patented the Smart Card—that is, the chip at the end of your credit card—in 1974?), culinary delights, cultural milestones, cinematic legends, scientists, historical characters, artists, fashion innovators (obviously; she couldn’t just leave them out altogether), and beyond. “The whole book is a big disorder,” laughed Baudry, noting that each event, person, or fact is listed randomly. “But I think every entry is linked.” Case in point? Romantic poet Victor Hugo has his page right before the French kiss. More ironic couplings include Versailles and flea markets, the Tour de France and cheese, and the magazine Paris Match and philosopher Voltaire. “We French people are a bit of a paradox,” explains Baudry. “We are always between tradition and modernity, the past and the present. There’s always a contrast,” she said. Continue Reading “Joie de Vivre, in 216 Pages” »

In Paris, Superstars and Fresh Faces Made Model Magic

-------


Fashion saves the best for last, and Paris is usually where the magic happens—both in terms of creative collections and memorable modeling moments. This season, the city definitely delivered. Case in point: Kate Moss closing Louis Vuitton on the final day of shows. She’s done it before, and she’ll probably do it again, but a Moss runway appearance is always major. The rest of the Vuitton cast didn’t disappoint, either. Edita Vilkeviciute, Eliza Cummings, Georgia May Jagger, Isabeli Fontana, Jessica Hart, and Maryna Linchuk were a few of the other familiar faces on Jacobs’ catwalk. Earlier in the week, Riccardo Tisci brought in some of his favorite ladies, including Natalia Vodianova, Mariacarla Boscono, and Erin Wasson, to parade his electrifying lineup for Givenchy. Fall ’13′s freshman class of models also ended the month with a bang. Forget New York, London, and Milan. For newcomers looking to make an impression (read: land ad campaigns), Paris is the one city that really counts. Many of the girls we’ve had our eye on since the beginning kept the momentum going in France. Sam Rollinson finished out with sixty-two shows; Sasha Luss (lower left) ended with fifty-seven; Chiharu Okunugi totaled fifty-four; and Katya Riabinkina (upper left) did forty-seven. Amanda Murphy, who bookended Prada, turned it up a notch this week, too, walking nine top-tier shows, including Dries Van Noten, Lanvin, Dior, Stella McCartney, and Chanel. Meanwhile, we’ve also got our eye on Elise Smidt (upper right), who opened Chloé and Sacai and turned up at Valentino, Vuitton, and Miu Miu; and Elisabeth Erm (lower right), who started out relatively slow in New York but made all the right moves toward the end (Balenciaga, Chanel, Dior, Givenchy, Giambattista Valli, and Valentino). Keep an eye out for these faces in the coming months’ editorials. We have a feeling they’ll appear on more than a few pages.

Photo: GoRunway