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August 27 2014

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122 posts tagged "Dior"

The Couture World And The Real World

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The Haute Couture shows, which wrapped in Paris this week, are the summa of impossible luxury in the world of fashion. Whatever you can do with clothes (and much of what you think you can’t) gets done. Put plainly, couture is a fantasy. But it doesn’t take much prodding to wonder about the reality, given that couture looks—those actually purchased, not lent to celebrities for red-carpet occasions—cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and that those on the sidelines have been bewailing the death of couture since the midcentury. Especially in times of economic downturn, a question looms over the proceedings: Does anyone buy?

On her blog today, Cathy Horyn put the question to a few houses and came back with an answer: yes. Sidney Toledano, Dior’s president, has said that the sales of Raf Simons’ first couture collection improved on that of prior ones, to the tune of double-digit growth. Even the more untraditional designs—a three-piece suit, for example—find clients. “We have more orders than our capacity,” Toledano said. Karl Lagerfeld confirmed buyers for his Chanel Couture, too. Horyn hints that they’re largely Russian, as well as Chinese and Middle Eastern. “Lately I’ve heard some incredible stories,” she teases, dropping only that one Russian Chanel client bought twenty outfits in a span of two hours. In the absence of journalistic muckraking, the world can only await the arrival of a headline-grabbing memoir called Confessions of a Couture Client. Here’s hoping some free-spending Muscovite can be convinced to step up.

Photo: Marcus Tondo / InDigital / GoRunway

Out With A Bling: Couture Closes with Haute Joaillerie

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From Dior’s demure gowns to Maison Martin Margiela’s high-fashion denim, the Spring ’13 Haute Couture shows had a lot to offer. But when it comes to couture, no look is quite complete without some jewels to go with it. As the last collections walked the runways today, some of the biggest houses debuted their Haute Joaillerie collections in Paris. Tina Isaac reports back on the most opulent baubles from Chanel, Dior, Louis Vuitton, and more.

Boucheron

Snakes are already trending for 2013—but it’s worth remembering that Boucheron has been turning them out for well over a century. For Spring, the house has rifled the archives and polished up hallmark designs from its first Serpent collection of 1968, giving them a more contemporary spin. Serpent rings in sculpted gold, beading, and the house’s signature snow setting—an eye-catching pavé of studied randomness—come with one head or two, in three sizes; pendants with honeycomb backs can be worn as a necklace or mounted as brooches on gold safety pins.

Chanel
For the first time, Chanel dedicated its entire high jewelry collection—all ninety-nine pieces—to a single theme: the camellia. The flower appeared rendered every which way: mounted into 3-D diamond swirls; flattened into graphic diamond pavé etched with a black spinel border; sculpted in onyx and white coral; fashioned into a diamond, gold and lacquer ring rendition of Mademoiselle’s celebrated Coromandel screens; or articulated in a big, colorful “origami” of pink sapphires and other stones.


Dior
As a prelude to the presentation of her new collection next July, Victoire de Castellane showed a curated selection of additions to existing collections. These included a trio of slimmer caned rings and bracelets in the My Dior collection, a Les Précieuses garden-inspired necklace anchored by a sizable emerald, a Toi et Moi rose-shaped ring in diamonds and emeralds, and a unique set of antique cameos mounted into earrings for the Coffret collection. Meanwhile, the house’s watch lines are expanding fast. Colored gems offset black or white ceramic settings in the Dior 8 line, russet feathers fan into the skirt-shaped oscillating weight on the new model of the Grand Bal watch, and a trio of Mini D watches feature zingy fuchsia, turquoise, or neon yellow bands.

Louis Vuitton

The latest addition to the Place Vendôme continues its travel through time, expanding the Vuitton galaxy with new takes on classic motifs. For instance, Vuitton showed new iterations of its lacy, articulated “knife edge” settings on a collar necklace. There was also a Monogram Infini fractal mandala and delicate bracelets mounted with the house’s signature star and flower cut diamonds. If there’s anyone out there who didn’t know the house was a new installation (Vuitton opened its Vendôme boutique and workshop in 2012), they could easily be forgiven for mistaking the diamond chandelier earrings for pieces that emerged from a bygone era.

Photos: Courtesy photos

The Recent Rush of Plush Velvet

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Nothing adds a royal touch quite like velvet, and we’ve noticed plenty of it in the recent pre-fall, Haute Couture, and even menswear collections. At Alexander McQueen, Sarah Burton whipped up an ecclesiastical draped robe in cardinal red, while Stella McCartney, Rochas’ Marco Zanini, and Peter Copping at Nina Ricci were among the designers who incorporated the fabric into eveningwear. Christopher Kane, for his part, took the material in a more casual direction with a cool biker jacket. Velvet is getting play in the real world, too. Jessica Alba turned up to the Dior Haute Couture show this week wearing a sumptuous black topcoat, while Joséphine de la Baume gave off a witchy vibe in a crushed-velvet number at the Amy Winehouse Foundation Ball.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW of our favorite velvet looks.

Model-Slash: Jewelry Designer Lindsay Ellingson

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Lindsay Ellingson’s line of silk-and-gold bracelets, Goldie Knots, is sweet and unassuming—a lot like the model herself, who has a girl-next-door appeal despite her high-profile career. She got her start by attending a scouting event on a whim in 2005. At the time, she was studying biology at the University of California at San Diego, and knew nothing about fashion. So when she was quickly picked up by an agency, flown to Paris, and instantly sent to meet with John Galliano, who wanted her to open the Christian Dior show (mind you, she had never heard of John Galliano or Christian Dior), she didn’t know what to expect. “My eyes were squinting so badly because I didn’t realize the lights were going to be so bright!” she says of her Dior debut.

A self-confessed science geek (in Valentino: The Last Emperor, the camera pans a room of models backstage in hair and makeup, and she can be spotted with her nose in a tome on Einstein), Ellingson, now twenty-eight, has been going nonstop since diving into modeling eight years ago. She’s walked for everyone from Michael Kors to Chanel, done Victoria Secret’s runway spectacle for five years running (yes, she’s worn those coveted Angel wings), shot campaigns for the underwear megabrand, as well as Tommy Hilfiger, Moschino, and MAC, and starred in editorials (and a few cover shoots) for Vogue, GQ, and Marie Claire.

A stranger to fashion no more, the model is now somewhat of a designer herself, turning out high-quality creations of knotted silk and 14-karat gold that she makes by hand. Having learned the craft from her mother, Ellingson started by making the bracelets for herself. However, the baubles quickly caught the attention of her friends, and a Victoria’s Secret stylist requested to use them on a few shoots. Thus, Goldie Knots was born. Most of her business has come from word of mouth, but her Web site is launching this spring, where the bracelets will be sold for $150 to $250. A lover of animals, Ellingson will be donating a portion of the proceeds to help out her furry friends. “So far, in just the very small amount of business I’ve done, I’ve donated about $2,000 to the Humane Society of the United States.” Talk about an Angel.

Photo: Antonio de Moraes Barros/ Getty Images

Galliano Returns

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He’s back. This morning, WWD released an extensive feature announcing that for the first time since his Paris café outburst and departure from Dior, John Galliano has reemerged—in Oscar de la Renta’s studio, of all places. Galliano will work in de la Renta’s studio throughout the next three weeks, in an effort to reimmerse himself in the fashion world. Believed to have been facilitated by Anna Wintour, who is a close friend of de la Renta and was a key player in Galliano’s early-nineties comeback, the partnership is somewhat undefined, but de la Renta, who told WWD that he is a “great admirer of [Galliano's] talent,” asserts that he’ll welcome the designer’s input on his upcoming collection.

The story also features statements from Galliano, who comes out as a recovering alcoholic and apologizes for his anti-Semitic statements. “I have been in recovery for the past two years. Several years prior to my sobriety, I descended into the madness of the disease. I said and did things which hurt others, especially members of the Jewish community. I have expressed my sorrow privately and publicly for the pain which I caused, and I continue to do so. I remain committed to making amends to those I have hurt,” he said.

While this is, as WWD notes, perhaps the biggest fashion comeback since Chanel, it seems a surprising and unexpected move on both designers’ parts. The simplest explanation would be that Galliano is posed to take over for de la Renta, now 80, in the event that he were to retire. However, de la Renta dispels this notion. “Am I retiring? Is John going to replace me? Certainly not. I hope to be around for a long time.” Galliano has not yet revealed what he’ll do after his stint with de la Renta.

Photo: Victor Boyko/ Getty Images