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April 20 2014

styledotcom Platinum blond? So predictable! stylem.ag/1l3QRnh

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107 posts tagged "Dior"

Kanye West’s Shoe Collab, Christopher Kane For Dior? And More

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Kanye West is prepping to show his second collection in Paris, but in between working on his own line, he collaborated with Aussie label Dion Lee on footwear. West’s black pointed-toe heels were part of Dion Lee’s debut presentation at London fashion week. [Grazia Daily]

It has been a year since John Galliano’s departure from Dior, and his shoes still remain unfilled. The latest name to be thrown in the hat for the job? Christopher Kane. Suzy Menkes writes, “The collaboration between Donatella Versace and Christopher Kane with his sister Tammy is a sweet reminder of the Gianni Versace/Donatella years. But what if—as the rumor mill claims—Mr. Kane has been put up for the Dior job? There will be yet another round of musical chairs.” [NYT]

Today, Topshop announced plans to open a Los Angeles 25,000-square-foot space next year at The Grove. An L.A. store would be the British retailer’s fourth location in the United States, following a Las Vegas spot opening next month. [WWD]

Photo: Neil Rasmus / BFAnyc.com

Raf Simons To Exit Jil Sander

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This morning, Jil Sander announced that its longtime creative director, Belgian designer Raf Simons, will leave his post, effective February 27th. (He will show his Fall ’12 Jil Sander collection in Milan on Saturday the 25th.) The announcement comes after several months of speculation that the designer was being courted for other positions: First at Yves Saint Laurent, spurred by an insinuation in the International Herald Tribune in September, and then at Dior, for the role vacated by John Galliano and currently held by Bill Gaytten. (PPR, YSL’s owner, called the rumors “unfounded”; Dior has not commented.) Simons has not yet announced a new position; executives at Jil Sander said in a statement that his replacement at the label will be announced within the next few days.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

A Look At Lowit

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During her three decades in the business, photographer Roxanne Lowit (who is largely credited with pioneering backstage photography) captured rare moments with icons like Yves Saint Laurent, Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and Salvador Dalí. She’s also the shutterbug behind Backstage Dior, the 2009 tome that gave an inside glimpse at John Galliano’s ready-to-wear and Couture shows. This week, 26 photos, handpicked from the book and Lowit’s days shooting at Studio 54, go on display at the New York members-only club Parlor. Here, Style.com has an exclusive peek at some of the photos that will be included in the installation—which has no end date—launching with a birthday celebration for Lowit.

Photos: Roxanne Lowit

To The Cosmos And Back At The Haute Joaillerie Collections

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Coco Chanel launched her house’s fine jewelry collection in 1932, holding an exposition de bijoux de diamants for two weeks in November on the Faubourg Saint-Honoré. (The diamond Franges necklace above was in the original collection.) “Reason prompted me, initially, to create faux jewelry because I find it free of arrogance in an era of facile luxury,” Chanel explained. “This consideration vanishes in a period of financial crisis, when there arises an instinctive desire for authenticity in all things, which brings amusing junk back to its rightful place.”

You don’t have to look far for amusing junk—or a financial crisis—in our own day and age. As part of Paris’ haute couture week, the fine jewelry houses, including Chanel, Dior, and Van Cleef & Arpels, offered some very authentic options to discerning buyers, in new collections referencing past glories. Style.com’s Tina Isaac reports.

Coco Chanel loved a good talisman, and she decked her private apartment with an array of lucky frogs, sheaves of wheat, and special-order double-Cs and 5s for her chandelier overhead. But she was especially proud of being a Leo. And so for the first time, a lion jewel is set to appear chez Chanel as part of 1932, an 80-piece collection marking 80 years since the house entered the world of high jewelry.

In the meantime, the house previewed a selection of jewels based on iconic Chanel symbols, including a new rendition of the Comète necklace in titanium, white gold, and 85 carats of diamonds, as well as shooting star rings, bracelets, and necklaces. Among the standouts: the stunning Céleste brooch, a rendering of the cosmos anchored by a 79-carat baroque gray pearl.

Dior Joaillerie will launch an iconic new jewelry line during the Paris collections to accompany a lush compendium published by Rizzoli, so consider this display an aperitif: Incroyables et Merveilleuse earrings rendered as pendants, a Rose Dior Bagatelle ring in rubies and diamonds, and rose quartz renditions of the Pré Catelan ring and necklace.

A favorite of Wallis and Jackie, Van Cleef & Arpels is a doyenne of the Place Vendôme—and it’s got a major retrospective in the works at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs set for September. By way of a prelude, the house displayed a handful of birds of various sizes and colors, dating from the 1920′s to the 1960′s, the forebears of the brightly plumed Birds of Paradise, 2012 vintage. More abstract now than in the past, the new jewelry collection is informed by sweeping arabesques on necklaces and a number of colorful between-the-finger rings, such as a Bird of Paradise circling a ruby. “Mismatched” earrings with different colored stones in each ear, and a cascading necklace of turquoise beads culminating in a gem-encrusted parrot swinging on his perch, rounded out the new collection.

CLICK HERE FOR A SLIDESHOW of some of the key looks from the current haute joaillerie collections, as well as key archival pieces that inspired the new lines.

Photo: Courtesy of Chanel

Fashion’s Nights (And Days) At The Museum

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When we set out to tell the story of 2011 by the numbers, one loomed especially large: 661,509, the record-breaking number of visitors who lined up, often for hours at a time, to see the Costume Institute’s Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (left) at the Met.

But it wasn’t just a banner year for the Met and the late, great McQueen; designers and museums forged a strong bond this year, one that looks likely to continue well into the next. Museums across the globe invited designers into their halls and the results have made for some of the best exhibitions in memory.

During Couture week, Hussein Chalayan opened a retrospective at Paris’ Musée des Arts Decoratifs, where next year, Marc Jacobs and his work for Louis Vuitton will take up residence. The City of Light also played host to Ralph Lauren and his collection of automobiles (it also now boasts an enormous new RL store and restaurant, one of the town’s new favorite spots for burgers). And Florence is the new home of the Museo Gucci, opened during Milan’s Spring 2012 week with all due fanfare, and a Blondie performance to boot.

In America, socials flocked to San Francisco for the opening of Balenciaga and Spain (which also traveled to New York) and to Dallas for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier, which debuted earlier this year at Montreal’s Museum of Fine Arts. Just this month, Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte opened RODARTE: Fra Angelico, a show of the dresses their created for their June presentation at Pitti, at L.A.’s LACMA.

Farther afield, Dior went to Russia, where house jewelry designer Camille Micelli sent us this postcard, for Inspiration Dior, attended, naturally, by a lavish party. And the Netherlands continues to be a slightly off-the-radar destination for fashion’s cultural tourists. A retrospective of the work of Azzedine Ala├»a is now on view in Gronningen, outside Amsterdam, and the capital’s contemporary-photo museum, FOAM, which hosted the likes of Jefferson Hack for a panel on What’s Next, which followed a retrospective of work by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin—one which eventually became the germ of their new career-spanning anthology, Pretty Much Everything.

Here in New York, the more traditional homes of fashion, like FIT’s Fashion Museum, were busy, too. The museum recently opened the first part of The Great Designers, including Armani, Dior, Givenchy, and McQueen, and plans to open part two in March. Chief curator and museum director Valerie Steele also worked with clotheshorse and collector Daphne Guinness on an exhibition of her own holdings—which, it turns out, Guinness keeps organized via computer database.

Next year, all eyes will be on Miuccia Prada for the next Costume Institute exhibition, Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada on Fashion. But before then, there’s a Louboutin retrospective in London to look forward to, on the heels of the shoemaker’s victory-lap 20th anniversary year. And WWD reports today that several fashion labels are taking a renewed interest in their own histories, too. Balmain is ramping up its archival holdings, and Chloé recently brought on an in-house archivist, in anticipation of a retrospective planned for its 60th anniversary next year.

Photo: Courtesy of the Costume Insitute