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April 21 2014

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8 posts tagged "Dirk Standen"

Ushering in a New Era of The Fashion Book

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The Fashion Book

Fifteen years ago, Phaidon published The Fashion Book. As its title suggests, the book quickly became the definitive resource for the fashion curious and industry mainstay alike—an A-to-Z guide to the field’s central influencers, with pages devoted to everyone from Vivienne Westwood and Helmut Newton to Oscar Wilde. Last night at Topshop in Soho, Phaidon celebrated the release of an updated version of The Fashion Book. The tome features seventy-two fresh entries (Style.com among them), and boasts pages devoted to individuals such as Nicolas Ghesquière, Tilda Swinton, and others.

The fete’s main event was a panel discussion moderated by Parsons the New School for Design’s dean, Simon Collins. It included Vera Wang, Iris Apfel, and our very own Dirk Standen. The group focused on what it means to be iconic (“Being an icon implies a very distinct point of view, which is rather rare today,” said Apfel), the figures who inspire them (“It’s people who never really sold out, someone like Peter Saville,” said Standen), and, in reference to Rick Owens’ recent statement-making show, what it means for an icon to change and evolve. On that topic, Wang offered, “Mr. Lagerfeld said to me once, ‘Vera, if you really can’t change and you can’t go with the times and you can’t realize how the world is becoming a different place, then it’s time for you to leave.’ So it’s somewhere between that fine line of adapting every decade and sticking to what you believe in and furthering your craft.” It was an honest and up-front dialogue about the connotations of holding influence in the industry today—a fitting prelude to The Fashion Book of the millennial era.

The Fashion Book New Edition, $59.95, will be available from Phaidon beginning October 14.

Photo: Courtesy of Phaidon Press

Can You Hang?

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Is fashion global? Does each city have its own unique style? Last night, our editor in chief, Dirk Standen, addressed these questions and more during Style.com’s first Google Hangout. Style Map contributors including menswear designer Patrick Grant (London), Fasano Hotel’s PR director Paula Bezerra de Mello (Rio de Janiero), and DJ-cum-design-duo POSSO all contributed to the discussion, weighing in on such topics as Marc Jacobs’ final show for Louis Vuitton, the cinematic approach to runway, must-sees across the globe, and each city’s definition of style. In case you couldn’t tune in (we were crossing four time zones, after all), feed your FOMO: Watch it now by hitting play.

Join our circle. Follow us on Google+.

Phaidon’s The Fashion Book Gets an Update

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The Fashion Book New Edition

It’s no secret that Phaidon’s epic The Fashion Book, first released in 1998, is an authoritative resource for industry insiders and fans alike. Now the coffee-table tome has been given new life with a definitive updated addition. Among the seventy-two new entries are Style.com and sartorial luminaries like Bill Cunningham, Nicolas Ghesquière, and Tilda Swinton. To fete the book’s release, Phaidon will be hosting a panel discussion at Topshop’s Soho outpost on Thursday, October 10, at 6 p.m. Iris Apfel, Vera Wang, and Style.com’s own Dirk Standen will be on hand to talk fashion history and the new guard of style alongside moderator Simon Collins, dean of fashion at Parsons the New School for Design. Need another reason to turn out? You’ll have a chance to pick up the new book (as well as a limited edition tote bag and a signed print by cover illustrator Mats Gustafson) four days in advance of its official release.

The Fashion Book New Edition, $59.95, will be available from Phaidon beginning October 14.

Photo: Courtesy of Phaidon Press

RISD’s Feeling Fine and Dandy

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The dandy: It’s a term we hear on loop, it seems, when it comes to horn-rim-wearing street-style stars and all things bespoke or buttoned-up. But the dandy has a far richer history than the current zeitgeist lets on; one that includes the likes of George “Beau” Brummell—an arbiter of men’s fashion in eighteenth-century England who was known for being “extremely neat”—King George IV, Oscar Wilde, and Andy Warhol (whose paint-splattered shoes are pictured below). On April 28, Providence’s RISD Museum of Art will celebrate the term with the opening of its summer exhibition, Artist/Rebel/Dandy: Men of Fashion.

“As we delved into the subject of the dandy in art, literature, and history on an intellectual level, we felt a strong need to focus on the tangible garments worn by dandies past and present,” said Kate Irvin, the museum’s curator of costume and textiles. The selection runs the full temporal gamut—with current provocateurs such as Thom Browne and Waris Ahluwalia featured alongside more archival names, like Stephen Tennant (above, left), Charles Baudelaire, Richard Merkin, and Malcolm McLaren.

As assistant curator Laurie Brewer details, dandyism is as diverse as it is distinct, and it’s not strictly limited to one bracket of dressing. “I am always smitten with the extraordinary feat of what a bespoke suit can be—but I also fully appreciate Rick Owens’ radical take on menswear—hard and romantic, masculine and feminine.” Owens is also featured in the exhibit, lending credence to the sartorial vastness encompassed by the term. Expanding on the subject, the curators concluded, “there may be boundaries and rules that one feels compelled to follow when dressing, but one must always recognize that they are elastic.” Alongside the exhibition comes the release of a corresponding illustrated book, which features essays by the likes of Thom Browne, Glenn O’Brien, and Style.com’s editor in chief, Dirk Standen.

Artist/Rebel/Dandy: Men of Fashion will run from April 28 through August 18 at the RISD Museum of Art .

Photos: Cecil Beaton (Stephen Tennant); Courtesy of the RISD Museum of Art (Warhol shoes)

Decoding Fashion in the Digital Age

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As New York fashion week drew to a close yesterday, the digital world descended upon Lincoln Center for the first-ever Decoded Fashion Forum to discuss innovation in fashion and technology. Featuring tech and fashion titans alike, the panel included designer Zac Posen, Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley, and Rebecca Minkoff CEO Uri Minkoff, each of whom discussed the benefits and challenges of business in a digital age. Among the topics: redefining e-commerce, forecasting trends online, and the power of social media. “We live in a voyeuristic culture where communication is king,” said Posen, who counts over 130,000 followers on Instagram. “The ability to get a visceral reaction from the customer during the creative process is thrilling and satisfying.” Model and panelist Coco Rocha, who has amassed over one million followers on Google+, waxed poetic over the importance of staying genuine. “I don’t have some PR company posting my photos,” she told moderator and Glamour editor in chief Cindi Leive. “It’s very personal.” (The star of The Face also admitted to her new e-obsession: Vine, an app that allows users to share personal videos. “I’m practically the only model on there, so you all have no choice but to follow me,” she instructed the audience of bloggers and digital-media types.)

The CFDA’s Steven Kolb, Gilt Groupe’s chairman Susan Lyne, and our own editor in chief, Dirk Standen, were also on hand to judge the forum’s first annual Hackathon. (Launched earlier this month, the competition challenged five hundred applicants to create an original app that supports the global growth of American fashion). After the five finalists debuted brief presentations to master of ceremonies Candy Pratts Price, the judges awarded first prize to SWATCHit, a peer-to-peer platform connecting global designers with emerging-market artisans and overseas producers. The winnings? A $10,000 prize and an opportunity to have the app launched by the CFDA. “Everyone is looking for the next best answer in closing the loophole between fashion and technology,” said Stephanie Winston Wolkoff, who co-founded the forum with Liz Bacelar. “To anchor fashion week with an event that brings together all these talented people from different worlds is critical to the industry. This is the wave of the future.”