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August 28 2014

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36 posts tagged "Dover Street Market"

Louis Vuitton Is Setting Up Shop at Dover Street Market

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lv-doverDover Street Market is still on everyone’s lips. The concept store just made its social media debut with @doverstreetmarketlondon on Instagram, and its emerging designers like Melitta Baumeister and Hood by Air are generating lots of buzz for the fast-growing empire. At the London outpost, racks of Comme des Garçons (the owner of DSM), Prada, Supreme, and up-and-comers like Craig Green and Phoebe English will soon be joined by a particularly luxurious label: Louis Vuitton. The Telegraph reports that an edit of women’s shoes, bags, jewelry, and ready-to-wear from Nicolas Ghesquière’s debut Fall ’14 collection will be available for two months starting this week (just in time for the London shows). Not crossing the pond this season? Don’t fret: DSM is planning Vuitton pop-ups in New York and Tokyo, too.

Dover Street Market Dives Into Social Media, Comme Opts to Stay at 0 Followers

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dover-street-instaLena Dunham and Jack Antonoff, Gary Janetti and Brad Goreski, John Legend and Chrissy Teigen—those are some of social media’s newly crowned “power couples,” according to a NYT story out today. The writers, musicians, and models all made the list for their strategic—and very successful—use of social media platforms (Instagram and Twitter) to promote their partners’ projects, be it a new book or movie deal or clothing line release. Designers and fashion brands weren’t included as a part of the list, although we can think of several pairings that would have been an excellent fit.

The pioneering retail outpost Dover Street Market and its parent company, Comme des Garçons by Rei Kawakubo, however, don’t come to mind. They have remained staunch holdouts of the Internet age and completely inactive on social media—until now. Dover Street Market, in celebration of its 10th anniversary, has just announced it’s diving into social media, starting with an Instagram account (@doverstreetmarketlondon) that will officially kick off tomorrow. (We took a quick look—they already have more than 400 followers.) But the company won’t be leveraging its two brands on social to propel their successes—Comme reportedly has no plans to launch social media accounts.

“It’s the same reason why there is no Comme des Garçons website—it’s just images and information. [Rei Kawakubo] has enough to do. She makes the clothes. Dover Street is a different animal. It comes from the same mother, the same birth, but it’s a different thing—maybe getting more different,” Adrian Joffe, a partner of Kawakubo and president of the Paris-based Comme des Garçons International, told Business of Fashion.

Instead, the company’s social media “strategy” going forward is to differentiate the two. “As [Dover Street Market] grows, who knows where the future takes us? Maybe suddenly it will get so big and different, it’ll become actually separated,” said Joffe.

Run by AnOther magazine’s Web editor Laura Bradley, the Dover account will be full of “abstract messaging,” featuring chapters and stories instead of more classic retail store Instagram posts. “We want to use Instagram as a magazine,” said Joffe. Thank God—our feed has enough selfies and sunsets these days anyways.

Photo: Courtesy of @doverstreetmarketlondon

Of Clothes and Cats: Adrian Joffe and Simone Rocha Have a Heartfelt Chat in Love‘s Latest Issue

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Christy Love Cover

Simone Rocha may not have taken home the LVMH Prize, but the 27-year-old designer is in greater demand than ever. This month she’s poised (like Christopher Kane before her) to launch a collaboration with J Brand, and in Love‘s latest issue, she sits down with Comme des Garçons International president (and husband to designer Rei Kawakubo) Adrian Joffe. Joffe has been a staunch supporter since Rocha debuted her first collection with Fashion East back in 2010, and he also happens to have known the designer since she was a child. In the Q&A, moderated by Love editor Jack Sunnucks, Rocha and Joffe talk cultural identity, her “abysmal” academic performance, and the six dearly departed Joffe-Kawakubo cats. Also of note? The possibility that a Simone Rocha scent may just be hitting Dover Street Market shelves in the future.

An exclusive excerpt as well as a Patrick Demarchelier-lensed, Katie Grand-styled portrait of Rocha (sporting her own design) debuts below. To read the full interview, pick up Love Issue 12, as covered by Christy Turlington (shot by Inez & Vinoodh, and pictured above), Adriana Lima, Kendall Jenner, and Amy Adams. It hits newsstands July 28.

When Love joins Simone Rocha and Adrian Joffe, the pair are debating the very important topic of pets: Adrian has just revealed that he and his wife, Rei Kawakubo, used to have six cats at home in Japan.

Simone RochaAdrian Joffe: We liked cats, but there’s none left—they’re all gone. So nothing at the moment. But with traveling and everything it’s sad to leave animals alone, isn’t it?

Simone Rocha: That’s exactly what happened to me. We ended up moving around so much. They really need company.

AJ: Being half Chinese, half Irish—does that influence your work, do you think? Do you feel Chinese or Irish? Or does it not matter?

SR: I think it does matter. They’re so different. But one thing that is very important in both Irish culture and Chinese culture is family. So both my mum and dad have really big families and really important relationships with all their family. I love being Irish and not looking Irish, and I love going to Hong Kong and knowing that my granny lives there and my aunts and uncles, and I can go out and they’ll all speak Cantonese and play mah-jongg.

AJ: I’m guessing, though, that you don’t like to be referred to as Simone Rocha, the half-Chinese, half-Irish designer. That limits you, doesn’t it?

SR: I’d rather just be a designer. But I am very proud. I don’t mind being called an Irish designer, because a lot of people call me a British designer. I can feel the whole Ireland kicking off when that happens!

AJ: Do you remember your first memory of liking fashion? Was there one thing that set your love of fashion in motion?

SR: It actually just felt totally natural being around fashion, being around clothes. I absolutely love the smell of plastic bags—you know, when everything’s being hung up and shipped out.

I decided to do fine art originally, because I thought fashion would be a cliché. But after a year in college I’d done sculpture, ceramics, print—and then the very last discipline was fashion. And then I was like, Oh no, this is it—this is how I can translate my creativity.

I was actually a terrible student. I was abysmal in my B.A. None of my teachers thought I cared. And I didn’t. But I was still producing work, and there was obviously something in it!

AJ: You were having fun, I hope!

SR: That was the problem! I was having far too much fun—far too interested in socializing. But then I got in on the M.A., and around two weeks into it… Well, I’d never cared so much about something in my whole life.

AJ: So now you’ve done three shops with Dover Street. Can we do your perfume, too?

SR: That would be fabulous! I’d love that. I already know what it will smell like. Something real, but something really special.

Photos: Inez & Vinoodh (cover); Patrick Demarchelier (Simone Rocha)

Craig Green, LC:M’s Golden Boy, Talks Designing a Fantasy

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Craig Green“I am scared,” laughed emerging British menswear designer Craig Green. The 27-year-old, who previously presented with Fashion East and Topshop’s MAN initiative, is referring to his very first London Collections: Men solo show, scheduled for 11 a.m. on Tuesday. The runway event is sponsored by the BFC’s Newgen Men. “It’s nerve-racking. It’s just me. Alone. I don’t know if people will even come!” His jitters are understandable, but Green need not worry about the latter. The designer, who graduated from Central Saint Martins’ prestigious MA course back in 2012, is one of London’s most exciting up-and-comers. And his forthcoming show is one of the most anticipated on the calendar.

Green’s collections, which up until last season have incorporated sculptural wooden frames carried by the models, seamlessly combine the artistic and the commercial. They offer clothes that feel fresh and cerebral on the catwalk but that aren’t intimidating on the sales rack. That is in part thanks to Green’s utilitarian sensibility, which he picked up from his very practical north London family—his father is a plumber, his mother a nurse, and his uncle a carpenter.

Green caught the eye of Dover Street Market after his second show—the retailer not only stocks his wares in London, New York, and Tokyo, but also asked him to create an LC:M window installation. He decided to make a giant octopus in the same cerulean hue that will feature in his Spring ’15 lineup. The beast is currently swimming in DSM’s London storefront. But the retailer isn’t the only institution that has recognized Green’s talent. He was nominated for a British Fashion Award last October, was a semifinalist in LVMH’s inaugural Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition, and has collaborated with the likes of David Beckham and Adidas, Grenson and Mr Porter, Topman and Purified footwear. (He has a Champion USA team-up on the way, too.) There’s no arguing that Green’s star is on the rise. And maybe, just maybe, he doesn’t need to be so concerned about his solo debut after all. “It’s actually quite exciting,” he conceded.

Ahead of his Spring ’15 show, Green spoke with Style.com about his vision, his critics, and his dreams, like building a sturdy brand and moving out of his mom’s house.

You’ve basically exploded in the last year. How are you handling all the attention?
More like my head has exploded. I think I’ve aged more in the last two years than I had in the previous ten. I feel very fortunate to not dread coming into work every day. And I get to work with people who are friends of mine. I’ve had lots of support from Newgen, the BFC, and Fashion East. The BFC actually gave me a free studio for the next two years, which has been very helpful.

Dover Street Market has been very supportive of you as well. How important do you think DSM’s early embrace of your work has been to your success?
Dover Street Market is amazing and it’s always been a dream store for me to be in—it’s always been my number one. I just never thought I’d actually get there, especially at such an early stage. They’re the most incredible company to work with. Everything they do is so well executed, and they’re very respectful of my vision. I wish everyone worked the way Dover Street does.

Craig Green

It’s very impressive that you’ve stayed true to the artistic vision you cultivated at Central Saint Martins. You haven’t wavered from it for a second. Has that been difficult?
There is definitely a lot of temptation. Everyone has a different opinion, and you can’t let that affect you or what you’re doing. You have to use that criticism constructively. It can end up being a positive thing. But it’s definitely hard to stay true to my aesthetic.

Even though you have this cerebral side, your clothes have a realistic, utilitarian twist. They shine in the context of your conceptual catwalks, but can also easily be worn by a normal guy walking down the street.
That balance has become more and more important for us. In the beginning, I just wanted to make amazing imagery, as well as amazing clothes, because I wasn’t really selling. But now it’s essential to have that balance between what we want to show—an emotion and a fantasy—and something that’s accessible and can fit into the real world.

There have been a few people who don’t get the artistic elements of your work. For instance, David Gandy, who’s an LC:M ambassador, made some dismissive comments on television about your Spring ’14 collection, which, for the record, received rave reviews from actual fashion critics.
That was my first [runway] show out of college. I didn’t know how it would go. It was a rush to get everything done. I didn’t have any money. I had no studio. I was relying on favors, and I didn’t really know what the hell I was doing. So when that happened, I was a bit down about it. But then people came out with positive opinions, and I realized that the collection was something that was challenging people. Some people loved it and some people hated it. It was an extreme thing to show. I think every designer wants to challenge people and push things forward and take risks. That’s what keeps fashion exciting and that’s what we love to do. I love the excitement of Oh my God, are we really going to show this? Are we really doing this? It’s not like we’re going to do something crazy every time, but I think designers always need to push.

Spring '14 craig

Do you think menswear is changing in that respect?
I think it’s really the time for menswear. London finally has its own menswear shows, men are a lot more open to suggestions…I think it’s still not going to grow or evolve at the rate of womenswear, but more people are interested in it than they were. Even if you look at BA shows, you’re seeing a lot more menswear students. People are finally seeing the possibilities in menswear, which is really exciting.

How, if at all, did your north London upbringing affect your aesthetic?
I guess I’ve never really known anything else. A lot of my aesthetic—and my perspective—comes from my upbringing and my family. The main reason I got into fashion is because I love to make things. So if I wasn’t doing this, I’d probably just be somewhere making things. I love that we get to do projects like the Dover Street octopus installation. I love making a show. And my family is filled with people who make things. My dad is a plumber, my uncle’s a carpenter, and my godfather is an upholsterer. I remember when I did art projects in school, I used to call my godfather and ask him for upholstery, and then I’d call my uncle and ask him how to make something out of wood. In my house, there was always stuff lying around that I could make things out of.

Is your family proud of all your success? Do they get the fashion thing?
I guess so. I don’t know. They don’t really get the fashion world. But I’ve put my life into it, so it’s not like they’re saying, “Ugh, I don’t get what you’re doing.” They enjoy it. They like it more when I do something like the octopus. That being said, they’re really supportive, and I could never have gotten to where I am without their help. I still ask them for help now. They’re amazing.

Craig Green Dover Street

The generation ahead of you—Christopher Kane, Nicholas Kirkwood, et al.—are making it on the global stage in a way that, with few exceptions, London-based designers haven’t in a long time. Does that put pressure on you? And do you want to follow in the footsteps of, say, Jonathan Anderson, and get a big investor?
[Those designers' success] helps. It makes me think it’s all possible. It’s inspiring, and it’s gotten people to look to London more than they used to. I try not to think too much about investors and all that because what I’m doing now is so much different and bigger than what I imagined I’d be doing two years ago. It’s terrifying, but good. Of course, this is a real business, and I want this to grow into a real brand, a real company. And things are going well. We’re surviving. Two years ago, we were struggling. For Spring ’13, we couldn’t afford any fabric, so we made everything out of washed calico—which was actually kind of amazing because we made something out of nothing. But now we have the ability to say, “Hey, we want to use that fabric. Let’s get some and try it.” We have more resources to try things and do what we want.

What goals do you hope to achieve over the next few years?
I hope to stay in business! Survive! Move out of my mum’s house, maybe. These are life goals. But honestly, I hope to just be able to continue doing what we do. I’d love more brand awareness, to reach more people, and to do bigger shows. That’s always an aim. But as long as we’re able to make what we love, I’m happy.

Photos: Lucy Carr-Ellison; Courtesy Photo; InDigital Images; Courtesy Photo

Prada Reintroduces Spring ’08 at Dover Street Market NY

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PradaDSM

If you didn’t catch Prada’s Spring ’08 collection (this reporter was still in high school), you now have a second chance at those botanical prints, metallic leaf dresses, and sheer parkas. Dover Street Market has teamed up with Prada for another exclusive women’s capsule, this time reintroducing twelve key styles and prints inspired by that vibrant and memorable season.In true DSM fashion, these aren’t just copies of past designs; each piece is hand-painted and thus one-of-a-kind for a thoroughly modern spin. A first look at the lineup, which hits DSMNY tomorrow, May 8, debuts exclusively here on Style.com.

“I am so delighted to be receiving this second very special collection by Prada for Dover Street Market,” Adrian Joffe, CEO of Comme des Garçons (the parent company of DSM), told Style.com. “Their willingness to create these unique capsule collections for us fills me with endless pride and proves how much they understand what we are trying to do. I think it is fair to say that our mutual admiration and respect knows no bounds.”

The collection is just one element of a wider project that DSMNY is opening in celebration of New York’s forthcoming cultural events and art fairs, including Frieze. Palace Skate’s installation from Tate Britain, Comme des Garçons’ giant Kewpie, and a special exhibit of archive hats by Stephen Jones (which coincides with the launch of his new Wisteria Hysteria perfume) will be unveiled at an open house tomorrow.

The second Prada x DSMNY collection will be available exclusively at Dover Street Market New York, 160 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016.