Style.com

August 28 2014

styledotcom Catherine Bellis' ponytail looks a lot like the one we saw at Valentino. Here's how to get it: stylem.ag/1C68jx7 pic.twitter.com/SoJ6i9I7OO

Subscribe to Style Magazine
36 posts tagged "Dover Street Market"

Zana Bayne Talks Fall ’14 and the First Lady

-------

Zana Bayne

Since launching her line in 2010, New York-based designer Zana Bayne has been blurring the lines between clothing, accessories, and bondage-tinged harnesses at warp speed. Fresh off her New York fashion week debut, she jetted to Paris, her home away from home, to present her collection to buyers.

“The whole city is black and gold. When I got back to Paris, I thought, Oh, so that’s where this collection came from,” said the raven-haired designer of her Fall ’14 outing, Ornamentalist. The lineup was inspired by fifties-era images from L’Officiel and featured black and croc-embossed cowhide and gold embellishments.

Belts became bras, or were elongated to look like skirts, sometimes with extreme accentuated waists. Some pieces were adorned with tassels, big buckles, or extra rivets, and a lingerie feel was created via elastic details and garter belts.

While in Paris, Bayne welcomed Rei Kawakubo to her showroom—Bayne’s leathers are currently sold at Comme des Garçons in New York, and she’s preparing for a project with London’s Dover Street Market in the fall. Bayne’s wares, which are priced between $150 and $1,500, are also carried by such stockists as Opening Ceremony, Selfridges in London, and Paris’ Mise en Cage.

Bayne aims to clothe more than just fashion’s edgy avant-garde. In fact, the ambitious 25-year-old, who has crafted pieces for both Prabal Gurung and Lorde, is aiming for sartorial world domination. She is expanding her handbag line and splitting her collection into two: the handcrafted runway range Zana Bayne Collection, and Zana Bayne Originals, which will offer seasonless pieces from the archive.

“It’s not just for the cool kids. There are pieces for all sorts of silhouettes. There are garter belts, full-body pieces, and really delicate items as well,” she explained. “I like to make sure there’s a variety.” Bayne hopes there’s a little something in her collections for everyone—even for her dream client, Michelle Obama.

Photo: Courtesy of Zana Bayne 

Delfina Delettrez’s Soft Surrealism

-------

“I’m becoming more minimal,” offered Delfina Delettrez during a preview of her Fall ’14 collection at New York’s Dover Street Market. However, as anyone who’s familiar with Delettrez’s surreal jewelry knows, the designer’s definition of “minimal” isn’t necessarily the same as yours and mine. To be fair, Delettrez did tone it down—gone are the eye earrings, spider cuffs, and wasp rings of seasons past. In their place are light, elegant ear cuffs and floating cage rings garnished with diamonds, sapphires, and topaz in a rainbow of lovely hues. “I wanted to use very classic precious stones in soft colors,” offered Delettrez of her Fall lineup, which is filled with pinks, lavenders, cobalts, and emerald greens. “It’s an evolution—a new way to wear diamonds,” she added, gesturing to a full-fingered ring stacked with prongs of stones. “Why would you wear one diamond if you could wear ten?” Good point.

Although, just because Fall is pared down doesn’t mean Delettrez’s freak flag is at half mast—she’s been letting out her wild side on the Fendi runway, where her delectable outré baubles accent her mother Silvia Venturini Fendi and Karl Lagerfeld’s visions. “You can exaggerate more on the catwalk,” said Delettrez, when asked about the growing family collaboration. “I’m obsessed by the movement of jewelry, so I really enjoy working different, crazy materials.” Judging by those furry cuffs she sent out for Fall, it’s work that she does very well. The designer also took a walk on the weird side when creating her Fall ’14 film, Gold Vein. Directed by Daniel Sannwald, the short transports viewers into the designer’s trippy but serene world. Have a first look at the new collection and the video, above, exclusively on Style.com.

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

-------

Marc by Marc Jacobs

RODARTE
Breakfast with my colleague Maya to go over the lineup for the next issue of Style.com/Print, which we put together while simultaneously covering the shows on the site and publish within a month of the close of Paris fashion week, a live-broadcast approach to making a magazine. Then it was off to the Rodarte show. Last season’s collection got slated, though I sort of liked its trashy energy. This one had more of the Mulleavy sisters’ customary handcrafted offbeat charm and should be a hit with their fans. After that it was on to Diesel Black Gold on the West Side, and then a meeting on the East Side with a European luxury house, who filled me in on its plans for a huge event later this spring.

MBMJ
Tons of energy and lots of food for thought at Marc by Marc Jacobs, which has been rechristened by its initials and is now in the hands of the London-based duo of Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier. Something about the scale of the plywood set and the refracted references here made me think I could have been at a show in Paris. There was an intriguing magpie quality to the clothes, as if you were moving through the racks of Dover Street Market from the Japanese designer section to the sophisticated European section to the streetwear section. My favorite grouping was the BMX-inspired looks. The show was a bona fide smash with the audience. It’ll be interesting to see how the aesthetic, a break from the line’s more insouciant past, plays at retail. Delphine Arnault, of the parent group LVMH, was looking on from the front row.

ANDRE WALKER
Talking of Dover Street Market, I ran into the new Comme des Garçons-operated, multiretailer space on Lexington Avenue to say hello to Andre Walker. Walker is the first to describe himself as an “elusive” designer, and after a few stops and starts, he’s back with a small line, thanks to the encouragement of DSM’s Adrian Joffe and Rei Kawakubo. You’ll find it on the seventh floor between Junya Watanabe and Prada, an indication of the esteem Kawakubo has for Walker.

NARCISO RODRIGUEZ
Every season, there are a couple of models who break through and start popping up in all the big shows so that you can trace the day’s development through their changing hairstyles and runway attitudes. This season, those models are Binx Walton and Anna Ewers, who in the space of a few hours went from Bolshevik ninja at MBMJ to sleek gallerina at the serenely beautiful Narciso Rodriguez show that closed another day of New York fashion week.

Photo: Getty Images 

Everything’s Waiting for You in…Midtown?

-------

topshop

According to WWD, ever-popular British high-street retailer Topshop has signed a lease for a 90,000-square-foot store on Fifth Avenue and 49th Street. The new digs will be the second-biggest Topshop store in the world, trumped only by the brand’s Oxford Circus flagship in London. It’s a logical move, considering the success of the company’s Soho shop, which marked Topshop’s U.S. debut when it opened in 2009. But the news has got us wondering: Could Midtown be gaining some cred? It’s not exactly the first place we associate with on-the-pulse chic, but considering Dover Street Market bowed in Murray Hill in December and that Topshop—along with all its covetable capsules—is moving in, we think the hood could have some potential.

Photo: via WWD 

Nipponista Lands in New York: Finally, a Pop-Up Store That’s Worth Visiting

-------

Nipponista Store

Come Thursday, Dover Street Market won’t be the only conceptual Japanese-centric retailer in town—Tokyo-based department store Isetan is bringing its Nipponista pop-up to Soho. “Isetan considers New York the hub of fashion in the business sense, and their ultimate goal is to open a permanent store,” said Kohsuke Miki, the creative director of the project. The weeklong pop-up is sponsored by both Isetan and the Japanese government’s Cool Japan initiative, through which the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry aims to promote Japanese products, craft, and technique abroad.

“For more than twenty years, there hasn’t been significant [Japanese] talent that actually surpasses the talent that existed before it,” Kohsuke said. “In the eighties there was Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto, and in the seventies there was Issey Miyake, Kansai Yamamoto, and Kenzo Takada.” Kohsuke believes that Nipponista, a cuter construct of the word Japanophile, is the right first step in establishing the new guard of Japanese creative talent and design.

Nipponista

Nipponista’s 2,000-square-foot space, which debuts exclusively here, features wares from some of the heritage brands Kohsuke mentioned—there’s a vintage Yohji Yamamoto ensemble, as well as choice pieces from Kansai Yamamoto’s latest collection (he revived his brand in 2013). But a coterie of designs from five emerging talents, who were commissioned to craft clothes in traditional Japanese indigo, or “Japanese blue,” is the centerpiece. Other fashion offerings include handmade sneakers from Hender Scheme, wearable embroidery from Maison des Perles, geometric jewelry from Shihara, delicate scarves from Suzusan, and garments from Anrealage and Yoko Chan, among others. Everything in the shop—even the giant window display of a teddy bear, which was constructed with hundreds of tiny balloons by artist duo Daisy Balloon—was made in Japan. Continue Reading “Nipponista Lands in New York: Finally, a Pop-Up Store That’s Worth Visiting” »