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July 25 2014

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73 posts tagged "Dries Van Noten"

On the Fringe

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Fringe at GucciWith the holidays in full swing, we’re in a festive spirit here at Style.com. And when it comes to party looks, we’re feeling for fringe—the stuff was all over the Spring ’14 runways. Imagine twirling on the dance floor in the white leather jacket from Altuzarra, or shimmying about in Emilio Pucci’s glam poncho. Decorative tassels added an artisanal touch at Dries Van Noten, Marc Jacobs, and Alexander Wang, while dense, carpetlike shag turned up at Proenza Schouler and 3.1 Phillip Lim. If a full-on fringy outfit is too much for you, get the look with a bohemian handbag similar to the ones we spotted at Céline, Valentino, and Gucci.

Here, a slideshow of our favorite fringed pieces.

A Frill a Minute

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Isabel Marant's Dramatic RufflesForget your average everyday ruffles. The flounces that count for Spring are exaggerated and bold. Bottega Veneta’s Tomas Maier sculpted mille-feuille shapes on day dresses from a cotton woven with copper so that the fabric held its exuberant form. Dries Van Noten covered several of his finale numbers with clusters of voluminous, unfurling rosettes. Isabel Marant showed a one-shoulder frock featuring endless tiers of rippling tulle, and Mary Katrantzou whipped up printed baby-dolls decorated with both real and (for good measure) trompe l’oeil frills.

Here, a slide show of Spring’s most dramatic ruffled looks.

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Give ‘Em the Slip

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Helmut Lang's Spring '14 slip dressScanning back through recent seasons, the runways have sometime looked like an episode of VH1′s I Love the ’90s. Think of the grunge revivals at Dries Van Noten and Saint Laurent, or the catwalk comebacks of Carolyn Murphy and Kirsten Owen. We’ve also seen designers return to logomania, crop tops, and overalls. But the nineties throwback that feels most modern to us is the slipdress—the clean, minimal lines of which recall the glory days of Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and a young Kate Moss. For Spring, everyone from Stella McCartney and Isabel Marant to Jason Wu and Wes Gordon put their respective spin on the streamlined look. Keeping with that theme, Donna Karan celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of DKNY by revisiting the slinky, low-backed “naked dress” made infamous by the character Carrie Bradshaw on Sex and the City.

Here, a slideshow of the season’s best new slipdresses.

Photo: InDigital Images

Pleats and Thank You

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Pleats from Bottega Veneta, Delpozo, and Dries van Noten

Pleating, in various iterations, unfurled as a keynote trend this season. Alexander Wang, for example, offered boxy swatches on miniskirts in New York. Also crimped in Manhattan: Victoria Beckham‘s peekaboo accordion creases. And, in Paris, Phoebe Philo caused a stir with loads of narrow corrugations at Céline. Yet where these designers skewed toward traditional folding, a trio of labels proposed a fancier twist on the technique for Spring ’14 via intricate pleats that mimicked ruffles.

At Delpozo, creative director Josep Font’s barley-yellow trousers, which boasted an arc of frilled pin-tucks, were a standout in his soft, painterly collection. In Paris, Dries Van Noten opened his show with a quiet white frock, the seams of which were embellished with whorls of gilded fabric. Bottega Veneta’s Tomas Maier, too, employed creased ruffles in his Spring ’14 lineup. One dress in particular—a gray-green number vertically veined in bow-like folds—was particularly striking. “I wanted to add texture and dimension in an unusual way,” Maier told Style.com. “The monochrome color, combined with the movement of the pleats, creates this effect.” To construct the garment, Maier and his team blended cotton with a vegetable fiber called ramie, which possesses malleable characteristics akin to copper. The result was a tactile sartorial sculpture.

Photos: IndigitalImages.com

Linda Farrow Fetes the Big 1-0

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Linda Farrow

By now, the Linda Farrow story is one of lore. Ten years ago, Tracy Sedino and her boyfriend, Simon Jablon (Linda Farrow’s table tennis-champ son), were redecorating an old warehouse that belonged to his designer mom. And by pure fortune, they discovered a box filled with old sunglasses that Linda had created for Balenciaga, Dior, and YSL in the seventies. The rest is history.

Ten years on and happily married to Jablon, Sedino has been busy fulfilling her mother-in-law’s design dream that was put aside for love, marriage, and children. In the past decade, with Jablon quarterbacking the business angle, Sedino has developed the Linda Farrow brand to an extreme: Their stand-alone products have drawn a legion of fans (think Rihanna, Gaga, Queen Bey, Madonna), and their collaborations have raised the bar even higher. Jeremy Scott, Erdem, Dries Van Noten, Oscar de la Renta, The Row, and Matthew Williamson are just a few designers with whom the brand has worked hand in hand.

To fete their ten-year diamond anniversary, Sedino is taking the brand and its muse—a giant doe-eyed raven-haired doll called Penelope—on a whirlwind road show. First stop was Colette, where Penelope wore Sedino’s Alexander McQueen wedding dress, and now, to Selfridges, where the brand has a “shop-in-shop”—the new parlance for pop-up shop. Sedino and Jablon have called upon ten brands, including Nicholas Kirkwood, Mawi, Falke, and Agent Provocateur to come up with a limited-edition selection of goodies (which will be available until October) to celebrate. And these products are not your typical eyewear. A gold detailed heel from Nicholas Kirkwood, some very naughty bow-detailed pantyhose from Falke, a super-sexy aromatic candle from Cire Trudon, and a Lycra playsuit-cum-harness from Agent Provocateur (which reminds us of something out of Fifty Shades) gives us a clue as to what is on the couple’s minds as they commemorate ten years of marriage and business. A clutch from Bottega Veneta PT 1 and a fur from Saga give the collection just enough grown-up veneer to sugarcoat the boudoir naughtiness. Good to know the flame hasn’t gone out—all ten-year anniversaries should be like this one.

Photos: Courtesy of Linda Farrow