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August 29 2014

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75 posts tagged "Dries Van Noten"

Three’s a Trend: Dries Van Noten Keeps the Style Set in Stitches

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Dries van Noten

When we first fell in love with the intricately embroidered coats from the Dries Van Noten Fall ’13 collection, we had no idea just how essential they would become. New York basically felt like one giant snow globe throughout NYFW, and such statement coats became the unrivaled uniform of the style set. Miroslava Duma and Taylor Tomasi Hill both stepped out in DVN’s opening look—a slightly oversized, midnight blue coat with shocking pink embroidery—and Tommy Ton spotted another showgoer in the camel and sunshine yellow version in London. We’ll probably regret saying this, but we’re secretly hoping for another cold front next year—all the more reason to expand our coat collection.

Photos: Photos: Tommy Ton; Courtesy of Collage Vintage

Take Five: Tracy Sedino’s Warehouse of Vintage Sunglasses

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Fashion folk are a curious bunch, and we’ve found that they tend to collect equally curious things. In our “Take Five” feature, we get the lowdown on our favorite industry personalities’ most treasured trinkets.

Vintage Linda Farrow Glasses

There won’t be enough sun-filled English days in this lifetime for Tracy Sedino to wear each pair of vintage shades in the Linda Farrow archive. “Oh, my god, I must have thousands,” she said last week at a dinner in New York. Sedino was behind the revival of the Linda Farrow brand, whose namesake designer worked with houses such as Yves Saint Laurent and Emilio Pucci to create glasses in the seventies and eighties. Farrow closed her business to start a family in the late eighties, and her crates of luxurious lenses were stored away in a London warehouse.

Over a decade later, Sedino—then a student at the London College of Fashion—began dating (and has since married) Farrow’s son, Simon Jablon. “His father had some warehouses,” Sedino recalled. “And he asked Simon to get rid of all the stock, because they were getting turned into residential properties. So I went with him, and we found original Pucci and YSL sunglasses piled three-floors high.” Obviously, their discovery couldn’t go to waste, so she and Jablon used it as a jumping-off point and rebooted the house of Linda Farrow. They sold some of the vintage styles but, more notably, began partnering with young talents to turn out glamorous—and often outrageous—designs. (Remember those Jeremy Scott Minnie Mouse shades? That was their doing). Today, the husband-and-wife team continues the company in Farrow’s spirit and makes glasses for everyone from Dries Van Noten, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and Suno to Alexander Wang, Peter Pilotto, and The Row. “We thought there was a massive gap in the market,” said Sedino of her and Jablon’s decision to relaunch Linda Farrow. “You have these big luxury houses that sign licensing deals, but other designers, like Dries, will never do that, because they value their brands too much. We wanted to reinforce what Simon’s mother did in the seventies by working with designers to create eyewear as a fashion accessory, rather than a licensed product.”

Sedino and Jablon celebrated their company’s (and their relationship’s) tenth anniversary this year. And to mark the milestone, the duo have not only offered up a ten-year capsule collection but also opened a pop-up shop in collaboration with BOFFO, right here in NYC. The store, which is located at the Chelsea SuperPier, and open through December 24, boasts a bevy of Linda Farrow’s most covetable products. As for that archive of vintage sunnies, Sedino told us that it’s a constant point of reference. “We don’t want our collections to be too vintage, so we take inspiration from the vintage styles, and incorporate new technology and materials,” she said. Here, Sedino talks us through her five favorite pairs of old-school Linda Farrow frames.

1. “These are acetate Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties. They’re my holiday pair. I love them because the idea and design are fun, and they’re quite comfortable on my face. Ironically, it’s hard for me to find sunglasses that fit—for Asians, it’s difficult to find pairs that sit on the nose bridge. I’ve been wearing these for the last two years, and I’m particularly inspired their shape, because they’re almost like a big chunky Wayfarer. You can really wear them whenever.”

2. “These are Yves Saint Laurent glasses from the early seventies. They’re kind of a round Jackie O style. They’re handmade in acetate, with metal arms. This pair is a one-off, so we don’t have stock anymore. They’re one of my favorite styles, because they’re the perfect size. But I don’t really wear them, because I’m afraid of losing them.”

3. “These are Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties, and they were kind of inspired by Lolita. Whenever stylists call in for Lolita-style frames, we send them these. I wear them all the time in the summer.”

4. “These are amazing. This is another YSL pair from the seventies. They’re not one-of-a-kind—we still have a few—but not many. The lenses are polarized, and because of the orange, they’re my autumn glasses.”

5. “This is the most iconic Linda Farrow style. I love how the sides are beveled. We’ve actually launched a fine-jewelry collection of 18-karat-gold-and-diamond sunglasses, and this is one of the styles we used.”

Photo: John Munro

On the Fringe

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Fringe at GucciWith the holidays in full swing, we’re in a festive spirit here at Style.com. And when it comes to party looks, we’re feeling for fringe—the stuff was all over the Spring ’14 runways. Imagine twirling on the dance floor in the white leather jacket from Altuzarra, or shimmying about in Emilio Pucci’s glam poncho. Decorative tassels added an artisanal touch at Dries Van Noten, Marc Jacobs, and Alexander Wang, while dense, carpetlike shag turned up at Proenza Schouler and 3.1 Phillip Lim. If a full-on fringy outfit is too much for you, get the look with a bohemian handbag similar to the ones we spotted at Céline, Valentino, and Gucci.

Here, a slideshow of our favorite fringed pieces.

A Frill a Minute

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Isabel Marant's Dramatic RufflesForget your average everyday ruffles. The flounces that count for Spring are exaggerated and bold. Bottega Veneta’s Tomas Maier sculpted mille-feuille shapes on day dresses from a cotton woven with copper so that the fabric held its exuberant form. Dries Van Noten covered several of his finale numbers with clusters of voluminous, unfurling rosettes. Isabel Marant showed a one-shoulder frock featuring endless tiers of rippling tulle, and Mary Katrantzou whipped up printed baby-dolls decorated with both real and (for good measure) trompe l’oeil frills.

Here, a slide show of Spring’s most dramatic ruffled looks.

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Give ‘Em the Slip

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Helmut Lang's Spring '14 slip dressScanning back through recent seasons, the runways have sometime looked like an episode of VH1′s I Love the ’90s. Think of the grunge revivals at Dries Van Noten and Saint Laurent, or the catwalk comebacks of Carolyn Murphy and Kirsten Owen. We’ve also seen designers return to logomania, crop tops, and overalls. But the nineties throwback that feels most modern to us is the slipdress—the clean, minimal lines of which recall the glory days of Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and a young Kate Moss. For Spring, everyone from Stella McCartney and Isabel Marant to Jason Wu and Wes Gordon put their respective spin on the streamlined look. Keeping with that theme, Donna Karan celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of DKNY by revisiting the slinky, low-backed “naked dress” made infamous by the character Carrie Bradshaw on Sex and the City.

Here, a slideshow of the season’s best new slipdresses.

Photo: InDigital Images