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5 posts tagged "Ed Ruscha"

Charlotte Olympia Steps Up for Art

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CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA and GAGOSIAN GALLERY Present Stepping Up For Art

Last night at the Gagosian Gallery’s Madison Avenue space, twenty of Charlotte Olympia’s signature Dolly shoes were radically reinterpreted for the sake of art. Aptly dubbed Stepping Up for Art, the exhibit—on view for three days—saw twenty contemporary artists including Jeff Koons, Ed Ruscha, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Laurie Simmons, Sachs, and George Condo (above) use the high-heeled platform as a blank canvas.

The project’s chief architect was not the brand’s London-based designer, Charlotte Dellal—although she was in attendance and in utter awe of her refashioned platforms—but 16-year-old India Wolf, the daughter of artist Maya Lin and collector Daniel Wolf.

“India approached me after having seen the hand-painted shoes I had done at Neiman Marcus in Bal Harbour during Art Basel Miami—they were painted in the style of contemporary 20th-century artists like Picasso—and she said, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if we actually did them with living artists in their own way rather than imitating?’ I thought it was a fantastic idea,” offered Dellal.

One year later, Wolf, with some help from her parents (“They advised me in the beginning about how to write the proper letters and how to ask the right people,” she said), was able to secure the participation of leading contemporary artists. Shoes were slashed by Sarah Sze, burned by Tom Sachs, bound by Christo, and photographed by David Levinthal. She also partnered with Studio in a School, a nonprofit organization that promotes arts education in New York City’s underfunded public schools.

Five schools—including PS 196 Bronx, PS 45 Queens, PS 16 Staten Island, PS 39 Brooklyn, and PS 75 Manhattan—also contributed their inventive Dollys to the show. “The kids’ work is so surprising, they don’t disappoint, either,” offered Thomas Cahill, president and CEO of Studio in a School. “That’s one of the lovely things about [Stepping Up for Art], the process and the respect for their work is mirrored by the whole respect that the Gagosian gallery has…these kids will have the memory of this forever.”

For Wolf, this night would surely be more memorable than prom. The Dalton sophomore and toast of the party wore Charlotte Olympia’s blank-canvased Dollys paired with a Spring ’14 Mary Katrantzou graphic print dress. “I’d love to work in art and fashion when I’m older,” she said, later citing Oscar de la Renta and Christopher Kane as two of her favorite designers. “I mean, I don’t wear their clothes. They’re too expensive,” she said with youthful modesty. “Half of my wardrobe is J.Crew and Madewell.”

In L.A., Fashion Meets Art

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Wear LACMA

After two successful seasons, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is set to release its latest Wear LACMA campaign, with resident L.A. talents Greg Chait of The Elder Statesman and Jennifer Meyer (past designers include Gregory Parkinson, Libertine’s Johnson Hartig, Juan Carlos Obando, and NewbarK’s Maryam and Marjan Malakpour). The initiative conceived of by Katherine Ross, wife of LACMA director Michael Govan, and member of the museum’s Director’s Circle, challenged the two local designers to create limited-edition wares based on the museum’s permanent collection. “The goal of this initiative is to present works of art from the collection in a new way,” Ross said. “Through this partnership we are able to highlight extraordinary works in the museum’s encyclopedic collection seasonally.”

Of his contributions, Chait told us, “I love the spirit behind the project most.” After experiencing the museum’s James Turrell exhibit, he felt compelled to create six custom cashmere tees and scarves boasting abstracted Native American motifs. Meanwhile, Meyer, Chait’s fellow CFDA/Vogue Fashion Funder, was drawn to Ed Ruscha’s painting Made in California. With the artist’s express permission, Meyer created two nameplate necklaces bearing the moniker “Made in California” in 18-karat yellow gold and 18-karat gold with white diamond pavé. “I think LACMA is incredible, one of the best museums around,” the designer said of the institution that’s been enjoying a resurgence of late. “It’s incredibly exciting that LACMA chooses to partner with designers rather than “artists,” so to speak…combining those two worlds.” It would seem Net-a-Porter agrees with that sentiment, as the e-tailer will, for the first time, sell a selection of the Wear LACMA offering on its Web site. Proceeds from the collection, which ranges from $180 to $6,450, will benefit the museum.

Wear LACMA will be available beginning November 19 on net-a-porter.com and beginning November 20 in the LACMA store.

Photo: Courtesy of net-a-porter

Monsieur Vladimir Dit Merci

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He may be a fixture on the fashion-party-circuit, but Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld continues to make a strong case for himself as an up-and-coming art world contender. Following a successful show with Sotheby’s last October, the Paris native previewed his most ambitious group exhibition to date this morning at developer Aby Rosen’s contemporary art mecca, 980 Madison Avenue. Dubbed Merci Mercy, the 35-artist show explores the power and vitality of the written word. “I was looking for a new concept to develop and discovered that many of the artists I like use text in a systematic way,” said Restoin-Roitfeld, looking every bit the power broker despite frigid climes and the before-noon preview. “It was a good opportunity to bridge the artists I love with those I’m less familiar with and contextualize them in a way that made sense.” Borrowing its title from a Louise Bourgeois inscription (left), the show features works from industry veterans Ed Ruscha and Nan Goldin) to Zeitgeist darlings (Tom Sachs and the late Dash Snow, whose work is pictured below). “We wanted to find pieces that were less expected or typical,” said co-curator and Bortolami Gallery director Christine Messineo, who was introduced to Restoin-Roitfeld by his sister Julia. “And we were especially interested in working with artists from our generation.” To wit, the pair paid studio visits to several younger artists including Rashid Johnson, Jason Loebs and, Lucien Smith, all of whom created original works for the show.

This March, Restoin-Roitfeld will curate a two-man exhibition with his longtime collaborator Nicolas Pol and Ashley Bickerton at Lehmann Maupin Gallery, but the roving dealer has no plans for a permanent gallery anytime soon. “I would like to settle down, but it’s a step-by step-process,” the 27-year-old told Style.com, though he’ll start by holding private salons at his new Upper East Side office. “I think it”s good to do things uptown. Young people should see what’s happening on this side of the city.”

Merci Mercy will run until February 17 at 980 Madison Avenue

Photo: Courtesy of Merci Mercy

Lots To See, Just One Eye

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Just One Eye is not your typical e-tailer. For starters, their brick-and-mortar flagship stands in the mazelike Hollywood compound where Howard Hughes used to live, work, and seduce movie stars. But really, it’s their product selection that makes them so extraordinary. Where else could you find a Warhol-signed Rolling Stones necktie tee, some Carlo Bugatti chairs, and a range of antique fine jewelry alongside looks from Rodarte, Proenza Schouler, Olympia Le-Tan, and Maiyet? Since opening the store last spring, co-founder Paola Russo (formerly of Maxfield) has focused on mixing fashion and art. And we mean big-time art. Ed Ruscha has been collaborating in various ways since the shop’s launch. Work by Murakami, among others, hangs on the walls at headquarters. And today, the shop is launching the first in an ongoing series of artist/designer collaborations, debuting a limited-edition range of Damien Hirst-decorated backpacks from The Row.

According to Russo, Just One Eye’s interest in commissioning these projects comes from the store’s mandate to create “specialness.” “Our vision,” she explains, “is to make and sell things that will last. We don’t want to be involved with mass-produced fads,” she says. “Real luxury is something that is timeless and exceptional.” Naturally, true luxury comes with a hair-raising price tag. Or, in the case of the backpacks, which ring in at a cool $55,000, a gasp-worthy one. But it helps to know that some of that cash will go to a good cause. A portion of the proceeds from the bags will be donated to UNICEF; ditto Just One Eye’s next, more cost-democratic collaboration, which will see Nate Lowman teaming up with Converse. “He’s painting 25 pairs,” says Russo. “So the question for the people who buy these shoes will be, you know, do you wear them, or keep them as art?” A question many of us have posed about our shoes. But not typically of our sneakers.

Visit Just One Eye at justoneeye.com.

Fendi On Wheels

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The 17th annual ArtWalk benefit hits New York tonight, with co-chairs Alec Baldwin, Carey Lowell, Richard Gere, and Coco Rocha hosting one of the social calendar’s most prominent benefit art auctions, with proceeds going to New York City’s Coalition for the Homeless. Shepard Fairey, Jenny Holzer, Ed Ruscha, and Richard Phillips are among the artists who have donated their work to the silent and live auctions, but it’s a piece from evening sponsor Fendi that may have the evening’s fashion-world attendees buzzing. The label’s Selleria bike has Roman leather seats, wheel and handle covers, pump, basket, and vanity case—and, for the easily misdirected, a leather-covered GPS. ArtWalk? ArtRide!

Photo: Courtesy of ArtWalk