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April 17 2014

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16 posts tagged "Edun"

The Split-Second Preview: Edun

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The Fall ’14 Ready-to-Wear collections are under way in New York, and will be followed by the shows in London, Milan, and Paris. Before the new clothes hit the runway, we’ve asked some of the most anticipated names to offer a sneak peek. Per usual, it’s a busy time for all—designers and fashion followers alike—so we’re continuing our split-second previews: tweet-length at 140 characters or less. Our entire collection of Fall ’14 previews is available here.

edun

WHO: Edun, designed by Danielle Sherman

WHERE: New York

WHEN: Sunday, February 9

WHAT: “I love the playful nature of this Mike Kelley piece from the Skarstedt Gallery. It’s an inspiration that runs throughout the Fall collection.”— Danielle Sherman. The designer sent us a photograph of Kelley’s artwork, above.

Photo: Courtesy of Edun

The Science of Sustainability

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No doubt sustainability is one of fashion’s hottest topics—first and foremost because we need to preserve the environment, and consider how what we wear impacts where we live. But all that is green has also become “trendy”—and for those not in the know, it’s hard to decipher the most important qualities when picking your socially conscious eco-chic duds. So in honor of Earth Day, Style.com spoke with renowned agronomist and 2004 MacArthur Fellow Pedro Sanchez of Columbia University’s Earth Institute and Sandy Black, sustainable-fashion expert, professor at the London College of Fashion, and author of Eco-Chic and The Sustainable Fashion Handbook, about the dos and don’ts of sustainability. “It’s complex,” says Black, when asked to define sustainable fashion. “The big definition is about long-term sustainability, but also there’s the economic sustainability, then there’s ethical and social issues. So in a way, the best type of businesses have combined all sorts,” she adds. Meanwhile, Sanchez qualifies “sustainable” as having to do with the source of textiles. “Production has to be economically profitable, environmentally OK, and agronomically OK.” However, he continues, “Nothing is completely sustainable. We’re all going to die. And people need to think about the time dimension. For how long is something sustainable?” he asks.

This brings us to the question of natural versus synthetic fibers. “I’ve made some mistakes in buying polyester,” laughs Sanchez, noting that due to the carbon released into the environment during synthetic production, he’s a natural fibers kind of guy. But Professor Black suggests that we need to factor in the time component. “It’s not natural’s good, synthetic’s bad. You have to take the whole life cycle into account,” she says. “You only have to consider the amount of water and energy that’s used in washing T-shirts and jeans that isn’t needed when you have a polyester item. Polyester lasts an awful long time, and people can keep it for a long time.” Continue Reading “The Science of Sustainability” »

A New Designer for Edun

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Today, Edun—the label founded in 2005 by Bono and wife, Ali Hewson, with the intention of boosting trade and clothing manufacturing in Africa—has appointed a new creative director. Danielle Sherman—formerly the design director of T by Alexander Wang and, before that, the design director of the Olsens’ The Row—will take the reins from Sharon Wauchob. Having designed Edun’s men’s and women’s collections for six seasons, Wauchob is stepping down in order to focus on her eponymous womenswear range in Paris. WWD reports that Sherman starts at her new post today.

Photos:Amanda De simone/InDigital/ GoRunway

Put A Bird In It

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“The first time I worked with animals was a large brown bear that stood up on its back legs and ate a gummy bear out of my mouth, giving me a big sloppy kiss,” photographer Ryan McGinley tells Style.com. “I’ve loved working with animals ever since.”

His latest animal fixation? Birds. After his Animals exhibition closed at New York’s Team Gallery just last month, McGinley’s got another pet project out—this time, it’s the Fall 2012 “Birds of Prey” ad campaign for Bono and Ali Hewson’s Edun clothing line. To play up the collection’s graphic knits and jungle-inspired prints, the photographer enlisted a cast of five birds to star in the images alongside models Zen Sevastyanova, Grace Bol, and Miles McMillan (pictured, left). “I love the mix of taking something wild and unpredictable into this very controlled studio environment,” McGinley, who recently took a trip to Africa with Bono and Hewson to meet the people contributing to the Edun designs, says. “The organized chaos is a general theme I’m interested in.” As for whether it was more organized or chaos, he adds, “The birds on this shoot always had a little sense of danger, because they are much larger and more powerful than you might think. Occasionally, they would fly away from the set and we would all just have to be patient and wait for them to return to work.” It wouldn’t be the first fashion shoot where feathers were flying. Here, Style.com has a look at the campaign (pictured, above) and an exclusive behind-the-scenes shot (pictured, below) from the set.

Photo: Ryan McGinley/ Courtesy of Edun

Marcus Samuelsson, Food’s Most Fashionable Man

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Chef Marcus Samuelsson has a string of impressive accolades for his achievements in the food world, ranging from multiple honors from the James Beard Foundation to becoming the youngest chef ever to get two three-star reviews from The New York Times to beating out 21 other chefs in Bravo’s Top Chef Masters competition. But the New York-based chef has got fashion cred to match—Samuelsson made Vanity Fair‘s International Best Dressed List last year, along with Kate Middleton, Tilda Swinton, and Carey Mulligan. He was also hand-selected by Bono and Ali Hewson to star in their Fall ’11 menswear campaign for their clothing line Edun. (Fittingly, Bono and Hewson hosted the party to celebrate the campaign launch at Samuelsson’s Harlem restaurant Red Rooster. Trust us, fashion folk made an exception to their juice cleanse diets that night to try some of his award-winning comfort food.)

Over the weekend, Samuelsson guest-cooked a four-course dinner at Sole East Resort’s The Backyard Restaurant in Montauk to celebrate his latest accomplishment, his memoir Yes, Chef. The book chronicles his incredible journey, from becoming orphaned in Ethiopia at a very young age to growing up in Sweden (where he learned to cook from his new grandma Helga) to cooking President Obama’s first State Dinner. Samuelsson took a break from the kitchen (where he was cooking up gravlax, striped bass, berbere roasted chicken, and more—all dishes he writes about in his tale) to talk with Style.com about the tome, his personal style, and his thoughts on the relationship between food and fashion.

What has the response been to the book so far?
The other night we did a dinner at Red Rooster so people could have a dialogue about the book. So many people are interested and excited about it. Whether they are chefs or not, I just want people to identify with it. When you cook recipes from a book like we did at Red Rooster and at the Sole East dinner, it is so interesting to get other people’s take on it [the book] and I also think they get a richer experience tasting the food and flavors mentioned in my story.

What food in particular holds the most sentimental value to you?
Meatballs, for me, will always remind me of being 7 years old and cooking them with my grandmother. It is not the fanciest, but it was a taste that was with me until I came back to Ethiopia.

The relationship between food and fashion has always been an interesting one. What do you think about that relationship?
I think there are a lot of similarities. You have to travel if you want to be a great designer or a great chef. You have to work for a big chef, you have to work for a big designer for a while before you go do your own thing. I have a lot of designer friends, like Jason Wu, and it is the love of the craft that we share. Real designers do it for the love of the craft and the same thing with chefs—they would cook regardless.
Continue Reading “Marcus Samuelsson, Food’s Most Fashionable Man” »