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July 31 2014

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10 posts tagged "Edward Enninful"

Prada Brings the Harlem Renaissance to Milan

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prada

This Thursday, on the evening of its Fall ’14 show, Prada will fete the latest installment of its Iconoclasts series—a project, launched in 2009, that has seen the likes of Katie Grand, Alex White, Olivier Rizzo, and Carine Roitfeld reimagine Prada boutiques in the fashion capitals. This time around, the house has tapped W magazine’s Edward Enninful to share his vision, and he’s chosen to style the brand’s Via Montenapoleone men’s and women’s boutiques in the image of the Harlem Renaissance. At the women’s shop, Enninful will install a series of black and white mannequins, clad in Spring ’14 and archival Prada looks, and pose them as if they were guests at a swanky Jazz Age era club. (The ambience will be topped off with a glitzy Art Deco bar.) Meanwhile, the men’s store will feature game tables and a blues trio. “The event is meant as a celebration of Miuccia Prada’s incredible work. Hopefully people will leave the event with a smile on their face,” Enninful told Style.com. “It is a very joyful moment, and I hope that people will be inspired by the men’s and women’s collections, the installations in each store, and the culturally inclusive direction of this moment in the Iconoclasts series.” To give us a better sense of what to expect, the editor sent us an inspiration image: Palmer Hayden’s painting We Four in Paris, above.

Photo: Palmer Jayden’s We Four in Paris , courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Boo’s Cues

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A photograph by Boo George

Rising photographer Boo George has been on fashion’s radar for some time now: He’s long been championed by editors in his native United Kingdom, and shot one of his biggest supporters, Katie Grand (alongside Marc Jacobs, backstage at Louis Vuitton), for the third issue of Style.com/Print. Now, here in the U.S., W has signed on, too. George is the winner of its first annual The Shot competition, a partnership with the International Center for Photography. In celebration of his win, images from George’s knitwear story from the September issue of W are now on sale at Artsy. If you’ve ever pasted editorial pages on your bedroom walls—and happen to find yourself with a low four-figure sum to spare—a George can be yours. Shots of Suvi Koponen, Meghan Collison, Irina Kravchenko, and Juliana Schurig, styled by Edward Enninful, are all available, in limited edition, beginning today; the September issue of W will appear on newsstands Thursday.

Photo: Boo George / wmagazine.com

Has Nicolas Ghesquière Surfaced?

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“Where’s Nicolas going?” has been the parlor game of choice for the fashion set of late, and as of this week, there may be at least part of an answer: onto Twitter. The new @TWNGhesquiere hasn’t breathed a (digital) word yet, but W‘s Edward Enninful posted a welcome message, which is probably about as close to an authentication as you can get without Twitter’s little blue check. Is it really him? The account is following a more-or-less Ghesquière-approved 11 people (including Enninful, Lori Goldstein, Charlotte Rampling, Pierre Hardy, and much of the staff of French Elle), but further than that, there’s no saying for sure, until (at earliest) his first transmission. The world awaits.

Photo: Twitter.com

New York Is Burning

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Anyone who has seen the seminal documentary Paris Is Burning or tried to “strike a pose” like Madonna is familiar with voguing—the gender-bending posing that flourished during the late eighties and early nineties with New York’s “ball culture.” Last night, W Hotels paid tribute to the “legendary” underground movement by putting on its own Love Hangover Ball—a voguing competition—in support of amfAR and World AIDS Day on December 1. Hosted by Kelly Osbourne, the walk-off drew a crowd of club kids and fashion fixtures, including models Karlie Kloss, Anja Rubik, Anne Vyalitsyna, and Lily Donaldson, and designers like Richard Chai, Zac Posen, and Prabal Gurung.

“I used to go to all the voguing balls back in the day,” said Simon Doonan, who judged the event alongside a panel that included Fergie, Mickey Boardman, and Jason Wu. Wearing a fur coat and a necklace constructed out of Liberace charm bracelets, Doonan reminisced about the old days. “I knew all those people and houses: the Xtravaganzas, the House of Dorian Corey, the Mizrahis. The level of style and preparation that went into the balls is beyond description. Drag queens would still be painting on their lashes at 10 p.m., and the balls would take hours and hours, going until 3 or 4 in the morning. Hopefully that won’t be the case tonight.” W‘s style director Edward Enninful was also a judge and voguing veteran. “I’m a huge fan of voguing. Growing up, it was a very important part of all our lives,” he said. “It’s a great art form. It’s glamorous. It’s fashion. I think the new generation is really inspired by what it represents.”

Speaking of the new generation, Donaldson and Kloss were just babies during the fad’s heyday, but were quickly swept up. By the end of the performance, both girls were pounding their fists on the makeshift runway, finger-wagging, and yelling, “Work!” When asked to compare her posing abilities to the divas onstage, Donaldson enthused, “These girls are on a completely different level. I wouldn’t stand a chance against them.” Perhaps Pat McGrath summed up the evening best: “Drama, drama, drama. Fierce, fierce, fierce. Realness.” Amen.

Campaign Crawford

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Lane Crawford, one of the top shopping destinations in the Far East, has a history of tapping top Asian models for its ads, and this season is no different. This time around, the retailer brought on Ming Xi, Xiao Wen Ju, and Wang Xiao to star in its Fall campaign, shot by Nick Knight. Edward Enninful styled the girls wearing the latest designer pieces from Alexander McQueen, Lanvin, Celine, Stella McCartney, Yves Saint Laurent, and more.

“The concept revolves around the idea of three tribes: Hard Leather, Tribal Street Wear, and Geometrics,” Enninful tells Style.com. “I wanted to play with masculine and feminine, androgyny is always a theme that works, and an exaggerated sense of color and proportion always creates exciting imagery.” Here, Style.com has an exclusive first look at the ad images and the accompanying campaign film.

Photo: Courtesy of Lane Crawford