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August 28 2014

styledotcom New in: Street style photos from Stockholm fashion week: stylem.ag/1tOrxTa pic.twitter.com/i7XkiGJJ3p

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5 posts tagged "Elena Perminova"

Keep Your Eye on Style.com’s 2013 Look of the Year Winner, Sara Nicole Rossetto

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Sara RossettoSara Nicole Rossetto is proof that you don’t need to be famous or have an expensive wardrobe to become a street-style star. The 20-year-old Italian communications student was snapped by Tommy Ton during the Spring ’14 shows in Milan wearing a crisp white button-up, gold Zara skirt, and Miu Miu shoes. Her image earned the most votes—she beat out paparazzi fixtures including Jennifer Lawrence, Rihanna, Giovanna Battaglia, and more—in Style.com’s 2013 Look of the Year poll. Of course, Rossetto’s model-good looks helped. Playing volleyball on the national level, her tall, thin physique recently landed her a spot on IMG’s local “development” board. While her dream is to work in fashion advertising, Rossetto wants to do more runway and editorial first, and loves dressing up for street-style photographers. Here, Style.com talks to Rossetto about her personal style, modeling career, and winning Look of the Year.

Congratulations on winning our Look of the Year poll.
I’m really happy about it! Everybody else was so famous, and I’m a nobody compared with them. I didn’t hear about the poll because I was vacationing in Switzerland for New Year’s and didn’t have any Wi-Fi, so it was a terrific surprise to learn that I’d won.

I have to admit that I didn’t know who you were before researching this picture. You do some modeling?
I am a model, but nobody knows me yet—I’m still “development.” Last year I started doing some modeling in Milan. I’ve always played volleyball and am quite tall and thin, so everybody told me I should try to do something in fashion, which has always been my passion. After high school, I sent some photos to IMG and they told me that I could go and visit them, and I actually signed with them! I’ve done a little runway and would love to go to London and New York. The thing is that I’m really Mediterranean-looking, and in Italy and Milan, that’s not so wonderful because they like blond hair and blues eyes, and I look Sicilian or Arab…

What are you studying at university?
I’m studying media and advertising. My ambition is to do a course in fashion communications, and then hopefully work in fashion advertising. They told me that it’s a hard industry, but I think I can manage that, and maybe modeling will help.

So you go to shows during Milan fashion week?
I really love going to the shows. A couple months before, I look for tickets. My dad used to do loads for shows, so he helped, and I’ve had the opportunity to see Emilio Pucci, Max Mara, Dolce & Gabbana…my favorite show last season was Pucci.

Who are some of your favorite designers? And how would you describe your personal style?
I love Miuccia Prada and the Valentino designers because of their elegance. Personally, I like to be quite simple when I get dressed up, and Valentino is sober but always elegant. Pucci isn’t quite my style because I’m quite sporty, but Peter Dundas knows how to make a woman look sexy, and the colors are amazing for the summer.

Do you dress differently for fashion week?
While I love fashion, I’m not trying to show off when I get dressed for university, so I usually keep it sporty in white T-shirts and jeans. During fashion week, I work on preparing my outfits and wear the clothes I like the most then—I’m already thinking about what I’ll wear next month. What I wouldn’t wear on a normal day I can wear to the shows. I love street-style photographers because they make me feel so important when they ask me, “Can I take your photo?” I’m not the kind of person who would say, “No.” But I don’t actually spend too much on what I wear. I mix Zara—my absolute favorite—with nice accessories.

Who are some of your style icons?
I like the simplicity of Audrey Hepburn and think Ulyana Sergeenko is so elegant—I love her couture line. The Russians are popular, and I like Elena Perminova as well because she’s tall like me, and Karlie Kloss, too.

Photo: Tommy Ton

Dior Walks the Red Square

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Yesterday, Dior staged its second show in Moscow—the first having been held in 1959. Russian designer (and street-style maven) Vika Gazinskaya was there to experience the event firsthand. Here, she reports back from the Red Square and gives us the inside scoop on the opulent evening.

Dior in Russia: then and now

When Christian Dior came to Russia in 1959 to show his collection at Moscow’s GUM department store, the reaction was as if space aliens had landed. Russian women were still recovering from the horrors of World War II. Many of them had lost their husbands and sons, so scraping together money to buy high heels wasn’t exactly a priority.

Thankfully, those times are behind us. Moscow is quickly becoming a fashion capital, and yesterday, Dior returned to the city to restage its Fall ’13 show at the city’s most historic landmark, the Red Square. It was a celebration of beauty set inside a mirrored pavilion specially built for the occasion, not to mention the first time the Red Square has ever hosted a défilé.

Dior in Russia in 1959

Dior’s “space aliens” looked really shocking to the Soviet people in 1959. Our nation was still recovering from WWII, and building a “new era of communism,” in which there was no place for heels and beautiful dresses.

Vika inside the pavilion

I was proud when I heard producer Alexandre de Betak say that he was impressed by the show’s set. V-Confession Agency, owned by Ksenia Tarakanova, built the mirrored pavilion in the Red Square. I loved the space, and I think my blouse matches well! Continue Reading “Dior Walks the Red Square” »

Get the Look: Stripes and Solids

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In the past year, Russian It girls Miroslava Duma, Ulyana Sergeenko, and Elena Perminova have made their mark on street-style blogs worldwide. But right now we have our eye on former Hello Russia editor and current fashion director at Kova & T, Natasha Goldenberg. Naturally, Goldenberg, who recently launched her own line, Tzipporah, has a covetable look just as eye-catching as her style sidekick and best friend, Miroslava. Tommy Ton snapped Goldenberg while getting into a car between menswear shows in Milan. She was sporting an oversize camel coat with striped Carven trousers. Get the look with pieces from Marni, Jimmy Choo, Boy by Band of Outsiders, and more below.

 

From top left, below:

1. Boy by Band of Outsiders coat, $1,690, available at www.thecorner.com

2. Barneys New York beanie, $149, available at www.barneys.com

3. Marni trousers, $840, available at www.netaporter.com

4. Jimmy Choo pumps, $525, available at www.luisaviaroma.com

Photo: Tommy Ton

 

Mira, Off The Wall

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Massimiliano Giornetti created a Fall ’12 collection for Salvatore Ferragamo so Russian in its references, you wouldn’t have been surprised to find out that the peasant dresses or astrakhan-tipped coats came with their own bottles of vodka. (Cheers to that idea, or as the Russians say: Nazdarovye!) So it’s only fitting that for Fashion’s Night Out, the Ferragamo store on Fifth Avenue is celebrating Russophile-style, with a party hosted by Moscow style queens Elena Perminova, Anya Ziourova, and Miroslava Duma (pictured). (Russian pop band Tesla Boy will be making its first ever stateside appearance as well.) Street-style star Duma admits that it’s only for love of Ferragamo and Mother Russia that she’s making it to New York fashion week this season; taking care of her young son and implementing world domination plans for her Web site, Buro 24/7, don’t leave her much spare time for shows, or dressing for them. But Ferragamo’s invitation was too good to pass up. “People are really fascinated by Russia right now,” Duma notes. “Which makes sense, because we were hidden for so long. And for me, it’s a great thing, to be given the opportunity to show New Yorkers some Russian culture. And,” she adds, “to show them, maybe, it’s different than they think.” Here, Duma talks to Style.com about the Muscovite moment, borrowing and buying, and what she really thinks about Pussy Riot.


You’re one of a cohort of Russian street-style stars. Why do you think Russians are the It girls on the blogs right now?
Eh, we’re the new thing. You know how fashion is—there’s always got to be a new look, a new idea, a new story. For a moment, street-style blogs were the new thing; now they have to look for a new thing. So today it’s Russians.

Do you think there’s a distinctively Russian sense of style?
I think Russia is still figuring out its style. Look at the history—we had cultural stagnation for like, 75 years. And in the Soviet Union, it really was, you had to wait outside in the cold to buy toilet paper. That scene in Moscow on the Hudson, that was a real thing. So in the 1990s, when we discovered oil, and this sheik era of Russia began, of course everyone wanted to buy the most expensive things. And they wanted to show off. I was a kid when this was going on, but I remember a rich woman saying to me, Listen, if you want to buy Versace, you make sure you buy something with a big logo, because otherwise, it’s a waste of money. Even later, at the beginning of the 2000s, I can remember going to into bars in Moscow and seeing at least five girls wearing the same Dolce & Gabbana logo jeans.

Now, Russians are more educated about fashion, and people with money, they want something unique. Unique and discreet. A couture suit, maybe. If it’s one of a kind, they’ll spend for that. And also now, there are different ways to be stylish. I mean, there’s always a woman in Russia who, you know, she’s got a rich husband who doesn’t know about fashion but who buys all her clothes, and he wants her to look sexy. And there are these girls, and some of them look really great, I must say, who are the daughters of very rich men, and they buy whole looks from Céline or Proenza. They want to look super-cool. And there are also the fashion professionals, who travel for work, and who know the little vintage places in Paris or London, and they mix and match a lot of things.

Do you like getting photographed for street-style blogs? I feel like it would stress me out. I mean, how much time do you spend putting together your fashion week outfits?
Donna Karan said if it takes you more than 20 minutes to get dressed, then you’ve got a problem. I live by that. I won’t spend a lot of time planning my outfits, even at fashion week. But I don’t have to—I mean, my talent in life is, I have a good imagination to put together an outfit. I’m not the most beautiful girl, I don’t write poems, I don’t make music, I’m not the best tennis player, but I can create a look, you know?

Has the attention changed the way you dress?
Yeah…Sometimes I’ll do a crazy outfit I know fashion people will appreciate, but then I look at myself and think, wow, if my husband saw me now, he’d say, are you OK? In my normal life, I mostly wear, like, jeans. Simple things.

Do you own everything you wear that gets shot for the blogs?
I probably shouldn’t say this, but a lot of my clothes are borrowed. I’m sure people look at me and think, Pfff, this girl, she’s just a silly girl with a credit card with no limit. But that’s not true! Maybe no designer will loan to me now…I mean, isn’t the whole point that girls think I bought the dress from so-and-so, so they go out and buy that dress?

So I went to look at your Web site, Buro 24/7, but it’s in Russian. Looks good, but what is it?
Buro is a news site that provides quality information on fashion, art, architecture, culture, books, social life. Basically it’s a source that keeps you posted on everything interesting that happens in the world—the kind of stuff you can talk about with people you don’t really know, after you’ve talked about the weather.

Any plans to expand outside of Russia?
We already have! We recently launched, by license, a European edition based in Croatia, and we’re planning to open a London office very soon and start an English edition. Plus there’s a Middle East version I already have partners for, and we hope to do an Asian version of Buro, and so on.

I mean this kindly: You really don’t look like the mastermind of an international media empire. Like, you’re very cute.
Thank you.

Speaking of cute Russian girls out to change the world…
Are you going to ask me about Pussy Riot?

Well, they’ve really become a cause célèbre in the West. But I have a sneaking suspicion that opinions are different inside Russia. What’s your take?
My opinion is that these are very stupid girls. OK, so they have problems with the president—no president is perfect. But what did they change? Who did they help? How did they improve the situation in Russia? All they did was start an argument. And offend and humiliate people who believe in God. That’s it. I do a lot of charity work, there are many orphans in Russia who need help, so it’s not like all I see is rich people and fashion. I know there are things in this country that could be better. But this…Ugh. You know, people who say, oh, Pussy Riot is so great—I feel like, they don’t know what’s happening in Russia, they don’t know how Russians think, what they’ve experienced. I’d love to ask some of these people, who love Pussy Riot, if they can tell me anything else—any single thing—about the political situation in Russia today. I’d be very surprised if many people took the time to find out more about what’s happening.

So I guess you’ve got some opinions about this whole thing.
Everyone in Russia has an opinion. [Sighs.] Look, I love America. Everyone’s so kind and positive. They don’t know what it’s like in Russia—I mean, this is a silly example, but if you look at comments on street-style blogs, in Russia it’s all ugly. There’s a lot of envy. But in the States, you know, there’s some of that but there’s also people making compliments. You never get a compliment in Russia. So you have to understand with these girls, these stupid girls, that what they did was triple the negativity.

Anything you’re particularly looking forward to for Fashion’s Night Out? Are you a big Tesla Boy fan?
I just like that there’s this event to celebrate shopping. Sometimes I feel, men really are lucky—they’re strong, they don’t get pregnant, they can sleep with many women, and no one cares—but women, they have fashion. We have this pleasure, to go shopping and play with beautiful clothes, and no one ever takes it seriously but it’s important, you know? Russia, for more than 70 years, we didn’t get to shop. We didn’t have fashion. So maybe we appreciate this idea more than most people.

Photo: Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo

From Russia, With Love

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Fashion is having an affair to remember with Russia. There’s the ubiquitous presence of Muscovite It girls like Elena Perminova and Miroslava Duma, Ulyana Sergeenko’s noteworthy Couture outing last week, and the rise of folksy dressing during Resort. Banana Republic is catching the Russian wave with a new holiday capsule, inspired by the upcoming Anna Karenina film starring Keira Knightley and Jude Law (based, of course, on Leo Tolstoy’s classic nineteenth-century novel). Creative director Simon Kneen went a step beyond name-checking the movie and brought in its costume designer, Jacqueline Durran, to style part of the collection.

“I was looking at all the rich fabrics we had that were a continuation from last season—the velvets, faux fur, and lace—and thought, this is feeling very Russian. So we arranged to work with Jacqueline and when she came in, it was like playing dress-up. It was a total kismet moment—which is what the book is all about, right?” Kneen told Style.com at a press preview yesterday. (For the record, he’s read it.) The result was wearable clothes of the usual BR mold that had just a touch of theatricality to them. A sharp wool military jacket was paired with a fur Cossack hat and dangling chandelier earrings, for example. Also noteworthy here were a head-to-toe winter white ensemble and cozy tartan topcoats for both the boys and the girls. Bejeweled bib necklaces, slim leather portfolios, and feather hair accessories topped it all off.

The Anna Karenina collection launches in Banana Republic stores on October 30; for more information, visit BananaRepublic.com. The film debuts November 9.

Photo: David X. Prutting / BFAnyc.com