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17 posts tagged "Elsa Schiaparelli"

Prada and “Schiap”: The Conversations Begin

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Today in Milan, the fashion set got a glimpse of some of the Schiaparelli and Prada pieces that will be on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations exhibition, opening May 10. How does one make an impossible conversation between two great designers from different eras possible? Curators Harold Koda and Andrew Bolton dug through Prada’s archive, as well as the Costume Institute’s collection and private collections, and culled 90 designs and 30 accessories by the two Italian female designers to demonstrate the arresting affinities between their work (Elsa Schiaparelli from the late twenties to early fifties, Miuccia Prada from the late eighties to the present). Take note, these are the first female designers to be the centerpiece of the annual exhibition since Coco Chanel in 2005.

The “conversation” plays out in seven themes, starting with “Waist/Waist Down” (which includes a 1937 black and white Schiaparelli number worn by Madonna’s latest film subject, Wallis Simpson, sitting next to a very similar recent look from Prada). It continues with “Ugly Chic,” “Naif Chic,” “The Classical Body,” “The Exotic Body,” and finally, “The Surreal Body.” The galleries featuring iconic ensembles by the designers are paired with videos, directed by Baz Luhrmann, with made-up conversations between the two women (the idea for these “impossible conversations” was inspired by a Vanity Fair series of unimaginable exchanges in the thirties). Here, a few images from the exhibition.

Photos: Courtesy of Teh Metropolitan Museum of Art

Fashion’s Nights (And Days) At The Museum

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When we set out to tell the story of 2011 by the numbers, one loomed especially large: 661,509, the record-breaking number of visitors who lined up, often for hours at a time, to see the Costume Institute’s Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (left) at the Met.

But it wasn’t just a banner year for the Met and the late, great McQueen; designers and museums forged a strong bond this year, one that looks likely to continue well into the next. Museums across the globe invited designers into their halls and the results have made for some of the best exhibitions in memory.

During Couture week, Hussein Chalayan opened a retrospective at Paris’ Musée des Arts Decoratifs, where next year, Marc Jacobs and his work for Louis Vuitton will take up residence. The City of Light also played host to Ralph Lauren and his collection of automobiles (it also now boasts an enormous new RL store and restaurant, one of the town’s new favorite spots for burgers). And Florence is the new home of the Museo Gucci, opened during Milan’s Spring 2012 week with all due fanfare, and a Blondie performance to boot.

In America, socials flocked to San Francisco for the opening of Balenciaga and Spain (which also traveled to New York) and to Dallas for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier, which debuted earlier this year at Montreal’s Museum of Fine Arts. Just this month, Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte opened RODARTE: Fra Angelico, a show of the dresses their created for their June presentation at Pitti, at L.A.’s LACMA.

Farther afield, Dior went to Russia, where house jewelry designer Camille Micelli sent us this postcard, for Inspiration Dior, attended, naturally, by a lavish party. And the Netherlands continues to be a slightly off-the-radar destination for fashion’s cultural tourists. A retrospective of the work of Azzedine Alaïa is now on view in Gronningen, outside Amsterdam, and the capital’s contemporary-photo museum, FOAM, which hosted the likes of Jefferson Hack for a panel on What’s Next, which followed a retrospective of work by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin—one which eventually became the germ of their new career-spanning anthology, Pretty Much Everything.

Here in New York, the more traditional homes of fashion, like FIT’s Fashion Museum, were busy, too. The museum recently opened the first part of The Great Designers, including Armani, Dior, Givenchy, and McQueen, and plans to open part two in March. Chief curator and museum director Valerie Steele also worked with clotheshorse and collector Daphne Guinness on an exhibition of her own holdings—which, it turns out, Guinness keeps organized via computer database.

Next year, all eyes will be on Miuccia Prada for the next Costume Institute exhibition, Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada on Fashion. But before then, there’s a Louboutin retrospective in London to look forward to, on the heels of the shoemaker’s victory-lap 20th anniversary year. And WWD reports today that several fashion labels are taking a renewed interest in their own histories, too. Balmain is ramping up its archival holdings, and Chloé recently brought on an in-house archivist, in anticipation of a retrospective planned for its 60th anniversary next year.

Photo: Courtesy of the Costume Insitute

Great Exhibitions

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In Manhattan, where a walk-in closet is a covetable luxury, finding the space to house over 50,000 garments and accessories is no small feat. Over the course of several years, that’s exactly what the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) has managed to do. Now, a hand-picked selection of looks are coming out of storage for two consecutive exhibitions, The Great Designers: Part One (opened yesterday) and Part Two, along with a pair of books to match (due out next year).

“For the general public it’s going to be the big names—Armani, Chanel, Dior—that are the attraction, but personally, I’m really excited about the opportunity it gave us to build out our contemporary collection,” Valerie Steele, the museum’s director and chief curator, said at the press preview of the Part One exhibition (co-curated by Jennifer Farley and Colleen Hill) this morning. Of the tomes, highlighting 500 looks by 100 designers from the twentieth century onward, Steele added, “I have wanted to do a book for the museum with Taschen for a long time, ever since they did a fantastic publication for the Kyoto Costume Institute.”

Both the exhibitions and books gave Steele a fun excuse to “shop”—two of the most exciting purchases are a black wool coat with delicate gold embroidery from Alexander McQueen’s Fall 1997 collection for Givenchy and a liquid silver Thierry Mugler mermaid dress from 1987. Part One features approximately 50 garments from several generations of designers. It was surprising to see how easily current looks by designers like Prada (a black and baby blue guipure lace and cotton frock from the memorable Fall 2008 collection) blended with early-twentieth-century pieces. The black Paul Poiret silk faille coat from 1908, trimmed with fine black and gold fringe that doubled for fur at a distance, is great for today’s pelt-wary. An Elsa Schiaparelli gown in black rayon, cut on the bias and with a swirling flower print, had an asymmetrical shoulder seen on many of the gowns in recent runway seasons.

The Great Designers, Part One at the Museum at FIT, Seventh Avenue at 27th Street. On view November 29 to May 8, 2012.

Photo: Courtesy of The Museum at FIT

Elsa Schiaparelli And Miuccia Prada Are The Centerpiece Of Costume Institute Exhibit, Kanye On The Runway Again, A New Collaboration From Acne, And More…

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The theme of the Costume Institute exhibition at the Met next year will be Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada: On Fashion. Baz Luhrmann has been announced as the exhibition’s creative constultant and designer for the May 7 benefit. [WWD]

Kanye is going to be on the runway again next month, but this time he’s performing for the annual Victoria’s Secret show. Miranda Kerr is also making her return to the show after being on maternity leave, along with fellow angels like Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Alessandra Ambrosio. [Vogue U.K.]

Acne has collaborated on a 28-piece collection with the Brit sculptor Daniel Silver, T reports. The “utterly cool” collection includes tribal animal prints and biker jackets. [T]

Jean Paul Gaultier and the chocolate factory? The designer has created a “one-off gold bar” for a French gold investment company, engraved with Gaultier’s name and a heart. The chocolate bar goes on sale October 14. [WWD]

Fendi’s New Designer Drive, Miuccia Prada And Elsa Schiaparelli Could Be The Next Met Stars, And More…

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Now you can have your Fendi and drive it, too. As part of The Whispered Italian Grand Tour, a new Fendi project that includes a documentary about Italy’s craftsmen, the luxury brand created a special-edition Maserati. The designer car will make its debut at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show in September. [Vogue U.K.]

After the Met’s record-breaking Alexander McQueen exhibit, the Costume Institute has another fashion-focused show set to follow, WWD reports. Miuccia Prada and Elsa Schiaparelli could be the next subjects under the museum’s spotlight. [WWD]

Dasha Zhukova’s new magazine, Garage, caused a stir this week with its controversial crotch shot cover. The cover model, Shauna Taylor, says, “I would have been stupid not to be part of this project. Not one single person can ever say they gave birth through a Damien Hirst piece of art. I can [if I ever give birth].” [Page Six]

To celebrate the 40-year anniversary of Alice Waters’ famed Chez Panisse, the restaurant and Levi’s partnered with writers and artists like David Byrne, Sofia Coppola, and Dave Eggers to create a series of limited-edition T-shirts. Of course, the shirts are 100 percent organic cotton with “plantable letterpressed hang-tags.” [The Food Section]

Photo: John Phillips/ Time Life Pictures / Getty Images