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April 19 2014

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2 posts tagged "Emily Weiss"

Gal Power: Nasty Gal’s Sophia Amoruso on Her $100 Million (and Counting) Adventures in E-tail

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Sophia AmorusoSophia Amoruso, the 29-year-old eBayer-turned-Internet entrepreneur behind Nasty Gal, is in New York this week celebrating a pair of milestones: the e-tailer’s eponymous new ready-to-wear collection and the launch of Shoe Cult, its debut footwear line. Alexandra Richards, Emily Weiss, and Mia Moretti joined her for dinner at Hudson Clearwater last night. “This is a first for us,” Amoruso told Style.com. “Until now we’ve kind of only thrown brutish parties, which is my comfort zone.” But there’s nothing brutish about her business savvy. Nasty Gal sold about $100 million in clothing and accessories in 2012. She sat down with Style.com at the Crosby Street Hotel Wednesday afternoon to discuss her 50,000-and-counting Instagram followers, her love affair with Nike, and how the new additions will add to Nasty Gal’s bottom line.

You did the show circuit in New York last season. Was that your first time?
I’d gone a few years before. Erin Wasson was a customer when she was doing her thing for RVCA. She had bought some vintage from me, and she invited me because she was inspired by [those pieces]. It was interesting to see the full cycle, you know, “Wow, I sold vintage, and something that was inspired by it walked down the runway.” There’s nothing more encouraging than that. That was 2009. And I’ve gone the last two seasons. But I’m not a blogger; I’m not an editor; I don’t buy many of these brands. For me, it’s nice to see it in person, but I’m not sure it’s totally necessary.

Would you like to be part of the official New York fashion week schedule in the future?
There’s no plan for it.

What is your impression of the New York fashion world, as an L.A. outsider?
I’m really glad that I can come participate and meet people who are making the fashion world happen. If I were personally in New York and running my business here, I could be pretty distracted by it. It’s glamorous. But in L.A., at the end of the day I go home and hang out with my boyfriend and my poodle.

Are there designers in New York that you like or admire?
I really like old Norma Kamali. I like to know what’s going on, but personally I still wear mostly vintage. And, like our customers, I’m not really bound to only wearing one designer, or a few designers. It’s kind of a mix and match. Although I love Céline’s shoes and accessories.

So you still spend time hunting through vintage stores?
I don’t go vintage shopping in L.A. anymore. I steal stuff from our vintage department.

How important is vintage to Nasty Gal?
Vintage is a significant part of our business. It’s something like 1 percent, but at the scale we’re operating at, it’s close to a $1 million business. For a lot of people that would be good enough. Continue Reading “Gal Power: Nasty Gal’s Sophia Amoruso on Her $100 Million (and Counting) Adventures in E-tail” »

Jobs, Restaurants, and Now a Magazine—It’s Just the Cherry on the Cake

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The tired cliché that fashion doesn’t eat is weakening every day. The latest assault on its reign comes courtesy of Kerry Diamond (by day, PR executive at Coach; by night, partner and co-owner of three bustling Brooklyn restaurants) and Claudia Wu (principal of the graphic design firm Oprhan, founder of Me Magazine) and their new food-meets-fashion biannual, Cherry Bombe. It may have the distinction of being the first culinary journal with a Karlie Kloss cover.

Diamond and Wu (above) are the definition of multi-hyphenate multitaskers, but at Cherry Bombe‘s Jo Malone London-sponsored launch party last night at the Spotted Pig’s semisecret third-floor test kitchen, she shrugged off questions of how she’d managed to put together a full magazine while juggling her other commitments. (Questioner finds his hands full with merely a biannual magazine and Web site to contend with, let alone a second job or a restaurant empire.) “Everyone says that, but it’s not like I’m there cooking or washing the dishes,” she laughed. “My boyfriend works at night. No kids, no pets.” Anyway, she went on, “It really was a labor of love in the truest sense of the phrase. There was also kind of a mission behind this. We really want to help all these great women in the industry get exposed a little bit more, and build a little bit more of a community.” Continue Reading “Jobs, Restaurants, and Now a Magazine—It’s Just the Cherry on the Cake” »