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April 18 2014

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12 posts tagged "Etro"

Etro Gives Paisley An Artistic Makeover

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Etro

Etro’s creative director of accessories, Jacopo Etro, decided it was high time to give paisley some love. “Paisley is the DNA of our brand, and we wondered how it would look through the eyes of contemporary artists. Given that the pattern’s historical roots are Indian, it was logical to team up with Indian artists—they obviously grew up and were surrounded by the print, so I was intrigued to see how they saw it in a modern sense.”

Etro sought out duo Thukral & Tagra—cult artists who he has long admired—and invited them to collaborate on a capsule of collection of accessories, which go on sale today in the Bond Street store. A series of bags in jewel-toned blue, green, and a deep mahogany brown get the full Thukral & Tagra treatment, which is based on surrealistic, fantastical notions. “I asked the artists to go through the archives, and before you knew it, they were on the computer making up these prints and almost obsessively creating these repeat patterns in a numeric fashion,” said Etro.

The Thukral & Tagra prints are actually renderings of houses festooned with lights and surrounded by gardens. “That was the artists’ little tongue-in-cheek poke at the burgeoning nouveau riche in India. The two gentlemen thought that this moment in Indian history had to be recorded.” An event will be held tomorrow night at the brand’s Bond Street shop to celebrate the launch, and Etro will further endorse his admiration of the artists by exhibiting ten of their works. “Of course, since this is Frieze week, I thought it was a good idea to give these incredible artists a little bit more global exposure.”

Photo: Courtesy of Etro

Mask Force

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Masks from KTZ, Emporio Armani, and Umit Benan

Could Leonardo DiCaprio have been on to something when he wore that odd welder’s mask in Venice last month? We ask only because we’ve seen a whole batch of bizarro visages on the men’s Spring runways.

Etro closed its thematic, Mexican-inspired Spring show by sending out models in embellished Zoro masks. Emporio Armani (above, center), too, showed eye-shielding veneers that were, if you will, part OTT sunglasses and part 2020 masquerade ball.

Umit Benan harkened back to a Turkey (his home country) all but forgotten in its modern—and troubled—era. Tapping the famed Milanese opera house La Scala for help, Benan paired each of his looks with guises of actors from old Turkish cinema (above, right). The effect? Caustically comic.

And then there’s KTZ (above, left), the U.K.-based label spearheaded by Marjan Pejoski and Koji Maruyama. Their combination of hoods, eclectic prints (one of which resembled an old map), and medieval metallic masks seemed to suggest a fusion of Westeros and East London.

Photos: Marcus Tondo/ InDigital/ GoRunway (Emporio Armani and Umit Benan);  Courtesy of KTZ

Is India The Next Big Player in Luxury Retail?

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Prada is reported to be in talks for an India entry. Alexander McQueen, Dolce & Gabbana, and Stella McCartney are exploring real estate for stand-alone stores. After opening his first boutique in New Delhi last year, Christian Louboutin is readying himself for a Mumbai launch. This year marks the tenth anniversary of Louis Vuitton’s presence in India—it was the first luxury brand to set foot in the country. Is India finally reawakening to luxury? Historically, it’s a country familiar with all things luxe. After all, in 1925, India’s Sir Bhupinder Singh, the Maharaja of Patiala, granted Cartier its single largest commission: the remodeling of his crown jewels, a collection that included an exquisite 234.69-carat De Beers diamond. Vuitton’s gilded links with India go back well over a century, when the Maharajas of Jammu and Kashmir, Bikaner and Baroda, ordered customized trunks from the company.

Then came freedom. For almost forty-four years after Independence, socialist India snapped all ties with luxury. It’s only in the last decade that the romance has rekindled. And it has to do with math. With a population surpassing 1.22 billion, and 81 million households falling into the upper middle class and high-income bracket, India is a serious market for luxury players. In fact, statistics show that India is one of the fastest-growing and largest luxury markets, with sales expected to touch $15 billion by 2015—nearly double what they are today. In November last year, Gucci opened its fifth and largest India store, spanning 4,220 square feet across two floors in Gurgaon, Delhi’s satellite city. Patrizio di Marco, president and CEO, noted, “The flagship store underscores Gucci’s commitment to India. This is our fifth store in this unique country, where we have been operating directly since the end of 2009, and it is a testament to the importance that we are placing on this fast-growing and competitive market.”

But Kalyani Chawla, vice president of marketing and communications at Christian Dior, insists India is taking baby steps. And she is right. The Western notion of luxury hit Indian shores only ten years ago. It’s still a country of salwar kameezes and saris. But the Indian buyer has grown interested in fashion, investing small but precious sums in brands. “Dior has seen a steady and encouraging growth. As is the case globally with most brands, accessories are doing very well [and] clothing is picking up,” she says, noting that this is partly due to the fact that Western wear has finally slipped into a bride’s wedding trousseau. And for Indians, marriage is the occasion for which discerning buyers splurge. Dior launched in 2006, and has three stores across the country. Continue Reading “Is India The Next Big Player in Luxury Retail?” »

Get The Look: Fully Prepped

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It’s no secret that fashion month is the time to bring out your statement pieces, and Jil Sander’s Faith clutch definitely fits the bill. Tommy Ton snapped a stylish showgoer walking in the Tuileries with her equally chic friend. We love how she paired the clutch with a preppy outfit complete with a pink monogram sweater (you saw them here first), a striped button-down, and forest green cropped trousers. Get the look with the essentials below.

From top left to right: Marni sweater, $640, available at www.marni.com; Jil Sander clutch, $700, available at www.netaporter.com; Etro trouser, $440, available at www.mytheresa.com; J.Crew shirt, $75, available at www.jcrew.com.

Photos: Tommy Ton; Courtesy Photos

In London, A New Outpost For The Globetrotting Etros

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Given that Kean Etro has the restless spirit of a natural nomad, it was a surprise to hear it was eight years since he was last in London. Nowadays, Kean prefers to spend his spare time in Mexico with his wife, Constanza, so it was family patriarch Gimmo who attended to the 18-month renovation that created the new Etro flagship on Old Bond Street. But Kean was there with brother Jacopo and sister Veronica—and Gimmo, of course—when the shop (above) opened for business last Thursday.

Previous tenants—for nearly 200 years—were the renowned Old Masters specialist Agnew’s, so the space was already appropriately laid out for the exhibition of rare and precious objets when Gimmo found it. The ground floor, for instance, is flooded with natural light from the skylights, which were a radical feature when Agnew’s installed them in the early nineteenth century. And the first floor, empty on opening night, is still a silk-wallpapered gallery, which inspired Kean to think about mounting the occasional show. The Etro family has always had an appetite for high culture, and there were already an impressive number of paintings and sculptures interspersed with the artful clothes and accessories on display.

After the cocktail in the store last week, guests headed a few blocks south to St James’s for dinner in Spencer House, the palace built for Diana’s ancestors in the mid-eighteenth century. It’s usually described as “sumptuous,” and who am I to disagree? Kean’s blazer in Etro’s signature paisley fit right in amidst the antique finery. The worn jeans and Astro Boy T-shirt with its flickering lenticular motif? A little less so. Still, not bad for a nomad.

Photos: Courtesy of Etro