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August 31 2014

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3 posts tagged "film"

A Bustle Is Forever—Especially When It’s Made by Yohji Yamamoto

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At this point, Gill Linton’s Byronesque has established itself as one of—if not the—premier online vintage-shopping destinations. When I last visited Linton, it was in a room filled with early Alexander McQueen, Comme des Garçons, Alaïa, Issey Miyake, and beyond. (Due to my vintage addiction, it was less full when I left, but that’s beside the point.) One of the most extraordinary pieces on display, however, was Yohji Yamamoto’s sculptural black bustle coat from his Fall 1986 collection. “There’s little [photographic] record of the coat,” offered Linton. “There are only three images of the garment online that we’ve been able to find, one of which is the famous silhouette shot by Nick Knight.” So, seeing as Linton is not only a seller of vintage treasures but a fashion-history devotee, she thought it only appropriate to pay tribute to the coat before it was shipped off to the Costume Institute at the Met, which purchased the rare topper for its archive. Enter My Dear Bustle, a film starring model Chelsea Wichmann, who dances to Zebra Katz x Hervé’s “Tear the House Up” while wearing Yamamoto’s iconic design. “The coat itself is very minimalist, but the sculptured contours of the bustle are quite complex. We wanted to create something that highlighted the craftsmanship of the design in a way that hasn’t been captured before, which was to get movement into an object that is so formidably sculptural,” explained Linton. “The slightest movement radically changed its appearance and added a sensuousness. We juxtaposed that with hard cuts in the edit, which were obviously led by the house baseline of Zebra Katz’s track,” Linton told me, noting that the contemporary tune helped underscore the coat’s timeless and forward-thinking aesthetic. “We love that we used a track reviewed as a ‘sweaty, dirty club hit.’ It’s so very not vintage, and that’s exactly what we set out to achieve. We wanted to show how contemporary the coat still is today. We never show vintage from a nostalgic perspective, it’s always about why it works now.”

Have an exclusive first look at My Dear Bustle above. And to view additional editorial content, absorb a feast of fashion history lessons, and shop a menagerie of delicious vintage wares, visit byronesque.com.

Kate Moss Plays Director for British Vogue

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We’re used to seeing Kate Moss in front of the camera. Just in the past few weeks, the supe starred in the new Stella McCartney ad campaign and verified that her career is stronger than ever—this year was her most lucrative to date. (She’s reportedly worth $92 million.) Seeing her on the other side of the lens, however, isn’t something that happens quite so often. For British Vogue‘s September issue, Moss took her first stab at filmmaking with The Wolf in Her, a short film that captures Lara Stone frolicking in the woods for a Mario Sorrenti shoot. Shot on a Super 8 camera, the film has a fuzzy, ethereal quality to it, enriched by background music from her husband Jamie Hince’s band, The Kills. A few wolves also made it into the video, which makes us question the fear factor on set. We’d like to think Moss kept her cool, as always. Watch the film, here.

The Pierre Bergé-Sanctioned YSL Biopic Gets its NYC Debut

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YVES SAINT LAURENT BEAUTÉ and THE CINEMA SOCIETY Host the After Party for THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY'S YvesFor French director Jalil Lespert’s new biopic on the legendary Yves Saint Laurent, the designer’s longtime partner, Pierre Bergé, granted unparalleled access to the icon’s original creations, including more than 5,000 dresses, 15,000 accessories, and 35,000 sketches. But working with the archival pieces had its limitations. “No one could sweat in the dresses, and it basically meant no moving,” said Marie de Villepin, who plays the designer’s muse Betty Catroux, at last night’s Cinema Society screening of Yves Saint Laurent, hosted by The Weinstein Company and Yves Saint Laurent Couture Palette. “I’m complaining now, but how amazing is it to get to wear those museum pieces that got pulled out for the first time ever just to be in this movie?”

While the film showcases YSL’s designs—from the famous Mondrian dresses to his signature Le Smokings, it also sheds light on the man behind them. His battle with severe depression, as well as drug and sex addictions, made his relationship with Bergé a volatile one. (This film, however, has Bergé’s stamp of approval, unlike the other movie about the designer that recently debuted at the Cannes Film Festival.) “It was the price of being a genius,” Lespert said. “I didn’t want to make a movie about his dark side, but it was important to show that he had these struggles.”

After the screening at MoMA, the movie’s star Pierre Niney, Harvey Weinstein, and Martha Stewart, among others, regrouped at Beautique on West 58th Street. Though 83-year-old Bergé wasn’t in attendance, Niney reported, “The first time Pierre saw it, he was in tears. If the guy who shared a life with him believes in the Yves I did, that’s enough for me.”

Photo: Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com