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September 1 2014

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7 posts tagged "Fivestory"

Paige Novick and Fivestory Launch a Colorful Collaboration

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Paige Novick x Fivestory

Shoppers can always count on Upper East Side boutique Fivestory for Claire Distenfeld’s reliably unexpected buys and singular tastes. Paige Novick is a friend and fan (the designer launched her fine jewelry collection, Phyne, at Fivestory last fall), which makes her the perfect partner for Fivestory’s first fine jewelry collaboration, Arc en Ciel. “Claire and I were enamored with the idea of incorporating traditional gemstones such as emerald, ruby, and sapphire with unconventional shapes,” Novick said of the five styles in the collection that earned its name from the rainbow effect that the multicolored ear cuffs took when layered on Distenfeld’s lobes. “Knowing how much Claire embraced color inspired me to push past my default parameters, which was ultimately very liberating,” she said. The pieces are designed around a refreshingly spring-worthy palette, while Novick’s own Phyne line focuses on finishes and shapes rather than color.

Distenfeld, too, feels that the partnership expresses their individual appreciation of design, and that a contrasting but still complementary seriousness and whimsy coexist. “I have a philosophy in life that everything should balance two extremes,” Distenfeld told Style.com. “[Novick's] pieces are both extremely complex in their geometry and pattern, but at the same time carry elements of simplicity and minimalism.” That duality compelled Distenfeld to lend her hand to the delicate ear pieces with her own wisps of elementary notions, like vivid hues and shapes. From collaboration to conception, the two married their singular vision and inimitable aesthetics through the prism of a rainbow lens, delivering an excitingly refreshing point of view.

Arc en Ciel ranges from $370 to $2,370. The line is available for preorder now on paigenovick.com, and will launch exclusively at Fivestory on May 1.

Paige Novick’s Fine Line

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Phyne by Paige Novick

Paige Novick may be known for her bold, architectural costume collection, but it’s her new fine jewelry venture, cleverly dubbed Phyne, that’s inspiring her to dig deep into her design DNA. “I saw an opportunity in creating everyday, versatile jewelry that would allow the self-purchasing woman to individualize her look in an effortless way,” Novick said of her decision to launch Phyne. While the same hand is evident in both collections, Novick’s sleek, over-100-piece range adds a more feminine and delicate touch to her signature, often geometric offerings.

Having debuted her costume line in 2008, Novick (who currently sells at heavy-hitting retailers like Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus, and Intermix) is no new kid on the block. But that doesn’t mean the latest venture was easy. “The perceived value has to be the prevailing factor when creating each piece of the collection,” Novick said, referring to the higher stakes that gold and diamonds bring to the table. Her design process entails visualizing each piece from all angles before beginning to create the actual model. It’s a method that seems to be working for Novick. The new rose, black, and yellow gold baubles—all of which are covered with diamonds or inlaid with opal, labradorite, or mother-of-pearl—boast a covetable balance between of-the-moment relevance and timeless design. And from the jointed cage rings to slick triangle cuff, the line offers an easy elegance that will appeal to a wide range of discerning women.

Phyne is available now at Saks Fifth Avenue and Fivestory. Prices range from $900 to $12,000.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Fashion’s Latest Emissary From The Fountain of Youth

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Dairy InstertStyle.com contributing editor and party reporter Darrell Hartman circles the city and, occasionally, the globe in the line of duty. In a regular column, he reports on the topics—whatever they may be at whatever given moment—that are stirring the social set.

Carlos Souza and Dorian Grinspan“Yes, the lad was premature,” goes a line from The Picture of Dorian Gray. “He was gathering his harvest while it was yet spring.”

I doubt I’m the first person who has, upon meeting Dorian Grinspan, thought of Oscar Wilde’s fable about precious youth. This Dorian is real. The 20-year-old founder and editor Out of Order magazine, he’s been sowing his seeds early—and some of the fashion world’s biggest influencers are taking notice.

Grinspan was born in Paris and came to the U.S. to study at Yale. But while an earlier generation might’ve chosen to wait for a diploma before launching into the world, Grinspan didn’t see the point. “I didn’t come [to the U.S.] wanting to do a magazine. I arrived at Yale and I was really, really bored,” he told Women’s Wear Daily. [Full disclosure: this reporter spent four years at Yale, and did not find it boring.] Grinspan will start his senior year in the Fall, majoring in American Studies, but he recently took an apartment in New York, and says that thanks to some Franco-esque schedule jiggering will be spending just three days a week in New Haven.

Youth these days! Grinspan is already a darling of the industry. WWD is only one of several publications to anoint him an up-and-comer, and his biannual is already carried by the likes of Opening Ceremony and Colette, and the second issue, which Grinspan launched last week, boasts the sort of top-shelf contributors of which many start-up outlets dream. Among the photo credits and profile subjects are Larry Clark, Ryan McGinley, and Olivier Theyskens. These are gets worth bragging about, even if Grinspan is modest, or at least PR-savvy, enough not to. “It’s actually funny to see how accessible these people are and how much they want to help,” he told me at last week’s launch party at Fivestory, an uptown boutique. (His fashion-model looks—literally, as in repped by DNA—aren’t the reason, but surely they can’t hurt.) Gus Van Sant, he added, had been “really interested, and we almost shot something,” but the scheduling hadn’t worked out.

Grinspan has plenty more influential supporters, including fellow editors. “Stephen Gan has been amazing to me,” he said. And after meeting Stefano Tonchi at a party in Cannes last year, Grinspan appeared in W this spring. Starting in the fall, he said, he’ll be writing for the magazine’s website. Quick work. For a moment, Grinspan did pay some dues—as an intern for Carine Roitfeld. Among the people met while working there was photographer Michael Avedon, who shot a story for the new issue. (Avedon is just a year older than Grinspan, and the great-grandson of Richard.)

Grinspan holds himself well—and tends to do so in the right company. Cynthia Rowley, who hosted an after-party of sorts for the magazine at her boutique-cum-sweet-shop, Curious, couldn’t exactly remember how she’d first met him. She was pretty sure his boyfriend had interned at her husband’s gallery. In any case, Rowley said, she’d gotten to know him through “the Brant kids.”

How has Grinspan done it, in an industry with fewer and fewer footholds for young talent? “I don’t think there’s a secret. I feel like everything is so circumstantial,” he explained. When pressed, he added, “Both my mom and my dad have a lot of connections in fashion, I guess.” His mother, a graphic designer, got him interested in clothes and style early on. His father, a lawyer, worked “for a long time” with BCBG. And there’s his godmother, Numéro editor–in-chief Babette Djian. “She’s been great,” Grinspan admits. “We go to fashion shows together if we both have an invite. But I would never call her up and say, ‘Please take me to Jean Paul Gaultier!’ That’s not what I want our relationship to be.”

If things keep going the way they’re going, the occasional missing invite won’t be an issue. And why shouldn’t they? Grinspan has a way about him, evident in the manner in which he politely escorted Clark up the stairs at Rowley’s party and posed with him for photos. Clark, like Rowley, couldn’t recall how he and Grinspan had first started talking, but he did remember meeting Grinspan face to face. “He’s very enthusiastic, but not overbearing at all—just a nice young man,” he said. And one more likely to make a splash than all the others.

Palmer//Harding: Beyond the Shirt

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Levi Palmer and Matthew Harding launched Palmer//Harding four seasons ago as a line that strictly offered shirts. Since, the London-based Central Saint Martins graduates have won NEWGEN sponsorship (they presented on schedule at London fashion week for the first time this season) and their constantly evolving range has been picked up by high-profile retailers like Dover Street Market, Fivestory, Louis Boston, and Moda Operandi. Looking at their Fall '13, it’s not hard to see why. The collection—their most comprehensive to date—features clean, voluminous blouses with long, sometimes floor-length trains, sculpted skirts, and shapely jackets in adventurous textiles (the most exciting of which was a “tarred” wool that Harding likened to antique leather or a “sticky cinema floor”), and sharp black trousers.

In case there was any doubt, the designers have made it clear that they can do more than just shirts. Heck, even the shirts are more than just shirts. One cotton poplin oxford looks simple from the front and then, surprise!, it’s backless. Some styles came with intricate embellishments on the sleeves, collar, or waist, and other silk/cotton voile versions incorporated gentle pleating to achieve a fluid femininity. “There are 15 different shirts in the collection. The shirt is still the star,” said Palmer. Harding added, “We just wanted to show people more of our mood, and our world, and we needed the separates to push that.”

Photo: Courtesy of Palmer//Harding; Set design by Thomas Bird

Fashion Stars

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Yesterday afternoon, leaders in the fields of fashion, beauty, and interior design braved the bitter cold to attend the Fashion Group International’s 16th annual Rising Star Awards. Held at Cipriani 42nd Street, the ceremony served to recognize the brightest emerging talents in a range of creative industries. Ralph Rucci, the event’s keynote speaker, kicked things off, joking that he was “happy to take a little vacation” from preparing his Fall 2013 collection. “You have to switch gears sometimes if you work in a profession where you’re seeking to beautify the planet,” he said. Paper magazine’s Mickey Boardman kept things light when he gave the Accessories Award to socialite-cum-handbag-designer Cornelia Guest. “Since I’m presenting accessories, I couldn’t decide if I should bring my Stella McCartney handbag on stage with me,” he laughed (in the end, he decided not to). Alexandra Mor took home the Fine Jewelry Award for her eponymous collection, which presenter Marion Fasel described as “the emeralds of my dreams.” And in the hypercompetitive retail category (Moda Operandi and Fivestory were among the nominees), Hayley Barna and Katia Beauchamp captured the award for their members-only beauty site, Birchbox.

The highly coveted womenswear awards (presented by Derek Lam) were won by Tia Cibani and Norman Ambrose (pictured with Lam above) for their respective lines. Tim Coppens received the Menswear Award, beating out Andy Hilfiger and Todd Snyder, and Meggan Crum and Mandy Tang were given the Karen Harvey Business Innovator Award for their site TheRunthrough, which connects fashion editors and stylists to product samples. “When we heard about this, there were major eighties dance moves going on in our office,” said Crum. And why not? The big winners deserve to disco.

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