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April 19 2014

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9 posts tagged "Francesco Clemente"

EXCLUSIVE: Inez & Vinoodh Add Color, and Soon, Clothes, to Their Repertoire

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Camille Bidault Waddington in Inez & Vinoodh jewelry

It didn’t take much time for Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin’s fine jewelry collection, Pretty Much Everything, to take off. But that’s no real surprise. After twenty-seven years in the biz, the renowned photographers and artists have a pretty good idea of what we fashion folk (and folks in general, for that matter) want—and they deliver. For their sophomore outing, the husband-and-wife pair continued to play with the interlocking-ring concept—modeled on their own wedding bands—with which they began last September. However, this time around, they’ve introduced new proportions, stones, and a rainbow of colors via a series of stackable enamel rings in varying widths. “There’s so much color in our heads because of how we live, and we couldn’t find the shades we wanted in actual gemstones,” said Van Lamsweerde of their choice to experiment with enamel. Ranging from lavender to shocking pink to electric yellow and beyond, the hues on offer were inspired by Inez & Vinoodh’s enviable New York apartment. So it’s fitting that the duo tapped their architect, Simrel Achenbach of Descience Lab, to help make the tints a reality. “Simrel has also created the paints for Francesco Clemente for years, so he knows a lot about color.” While that’s perhaps the understatement of the century, the team-up paid off. Who else could perfectly translate the orange of a Leonor Fini painting, the blue of an Yves Klein coffee table, or the shade of the family couch into jewelry?

The rings debut exclusively above in a portrait—lensed by the designers, naturally—of stylist Camille Bidault Waddington. “A lot of the furniture and art found in our apartment stems from the seventies, and Camille’s personal style and sense of color is very reminiscent of the eclectic and ethereal chic of that time,” said the couple. “Women can stack and combine all fifteen colors differently to amplify their mood or personality, and Camille’s portrait is the first in a series of magnificent people wearing their personal combinations.”

Pretty Much Everything

Elsewhere, there were wide, 18-karat white gold, rose gold, yellow gold, and oxidized silver bangles, each of which was attached to a contrasting metal band or a string of vivid stones or white pearls. Also new were precious iterations of their signature ring and star necklaces that come in strands of sapphires, rubies, emeralds, very rare Sleeping Beauty turquoise, or pearls. Slim bracelets garnished with diamond, emerald, ruby, sapphire, or Tahitian-pearl-embellished chains felt delicate and bohemian, while pavé diamond earrings oozed a decadent breed of cool. Currently carried by Net-a-Porter, Barneys New York, and Colette, among other retailers, the range, according to Van Lamsweerde, “has that chic, hippie vibe that I love, especially when it’s layered with pieces from our first collection. It’s fine, but it’s personal and easy—it’s not a statement, but at the same time, it still says that you understand fashion.”

Going forward, Inez & Vinoodh plan to expand their enamel selection and—get this—are working toward an apparel launch. “I can’t say anything yet, but you can expect it in the fall,” teased Van Lamsweerde. “Similar to our jewelry line, it will include things that we feel like we’re missing.” When asked why, with her and Matadin’s exhausting list of projects (major campaigns, music videos, perfume, and editorials are just some of their recent endeavors), they’re taking on yet another venture, Van Lamsweerde laughed. “We’ve learned so much from all the incredible people we’ve worked with throughout the years. Everyone is constantly feeding us input, and it’s too much fun. So, we thought, Why not?”

Photo: Inez & Vinoodh 

Light Bright: James Turrell Opens at the Guggenheim

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James Turrell's Aten ReignFor the past fifty-some years, James Turrell has been manipulating light to dramatic—and quite often hallucinatory—effect. His magnum opus, for instance, the thirty-five-years-in-the-making (and counting) Roden Crater , turns Flagstaff’s volcanic crater into a celestial observatory. A recent work in Las Vegas gives CityCenter’s Louis Vuitton boutique a neon-lit makeover, and his latest effort, dubbed Aten Reign, converts Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic Guggenheim Museum into a mesmerizing neon-lit vortex.

“The show has been in development for about six years, and it was a very complicated construction and design process,” explained associate curator Nat Trotman from the base of the Guggenheim’s rotunda, which has been transformed into a spiraling, shimmering kaleidoscope of shifting color-fields. “This building is very idiosyncratic—you can’t just build anything here.”

The installation makes specific use of the Guggenheim’s soaring, elliptical curves and skylight, adding aluminum plates encased with PVC-covered LED lights to Wright’s base to give the space the feel of a giant, tripped-out lamp. Usually covered with art, the walls are stripped bare, and the viewer is left to look up and take in a seductive, hypnotizing loop of vibrant, alternating blues, greens, pinks, purples, and so on. And at the exhibition’s opening last night, guests such as Ralph Lauren, Francesco Clemente, Jenny Holzer, Laurie Simmons, and Agathe Snow wandered the museum’s ramps, sipping champagne while taking in the multicolored glow.

“Light is a powerful substance,” said Turrell. “We have a primal connection to it. I form it as much as the material allows…. My desire is to set up a situation to which I take you and let you see. It becomes your experience.”

James Turrell opens today at New York’s Guggenheim Museum and will run through September 25.

Photo: Scott Rudd 

See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book

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Andy Warhol 
From Warhol’s Factory to Basquiat’s studio, throughout the eighties, downtown Manhattan was the place for young creative types to be. Photographer Jeannette Montgomery Barron was there, and her new tome, Scene, is a sort of yearbook of the time, documenting the likes of Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, Francesco Clemente, Willem Dafoe, and more early in their careers. “I was just a fly on the wall,” recalls Montgomery Barron, speaking at Indochine, one of her old haunts. (“It looks almost exactly the same, but there were a lot of drugs happening in the bathrooms back then.”) This afternoon, she’ll sign copies of Scene—which, in addition to the snaps, features personal anecdotes about each artist—at Bookmarc, and starting tomorrow, a select group of her black-and-white photographs will be on display in an exhibition at ClampArt. Here, Montgomery Barron discusses her book, and reminisces about shooting Warhol, working out with Bianca Jagger, and spending time with Basquiat.

 

How did you find yourself in the center of the eighties New York art scene?  

I was just lucky. It’s not that I went out and said, “I want to record every artist from A to Z.” It was more like I’d photograph Francesco Clemente, and he’d say, “You should really go photograph my friend Kenny Scharf.” It was very organic in that way. And, I mean, I knew I could drop a name. I’m sure I said, “Hey, I’m a friend of Andy Warhol. Can I shoot you?” I guess I’d get an adrenaline surge.

 

In the book, you mention that you could just call up Andy Warhol and ask to take his picture. What were those sittings like?  

The first time I photographed him was at the Factory in Union Square, and he wouldn’t even let me out of the outer lobby. When I met Bianca Jagger and we became friends, he warmed up. He never really talked much, but he always made you feel like you were the most brilliant person who said the most profound things. Continue Reading “See and Be Scene: Jeannette Montgomery Barron on Her New Book” »

A Walk To Remember

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Arguably, the opportunity to be in a room with Alec Baldwin is, in this day and age, enough to coax anyone out on a rainy night. Now add to that a good cause (New York’s Coalition for the Homeless) and an auction that includes works by Francesco Clemente, Jenny Holzer, Jeff Koons, James Rosenquist, and Silvia Venturini Fendi. Yes, you read that last one correctly. Artwalk 2010—hosted by Baldwin, Richard Gere, and Carey Lowell, and honoring Rosenquist—does primarily draw from visual artists for its annual for-charity auction, but since Fendi has signed on as this year’s sponsor, the house matriarch (and accessories designer) has ponied up, too. Hitting the block will be a made-to-order Selleria Peekaboo bag (pictured), customizable from the leather or skin down to the stitching and lining, in 37 color variations. No wonder Isabella Rossellini, Selita Ebanks, Heather Marks, and Olympia Scarry are all expected at tonight’s event. Want to join them? Tickets are still available at www.artwalkny.org, where you can also bid on auction items.

Photo: Courtesy of Fendi

Blasblog: DVF’s Family Ties

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Fashion schedules notwithstanding, Sunday night was, in fact, Valentine’s Day. And even with her fashion show the same day, Diane von Furstenberg was celebrating love as much as clothing, parading around her studio and fielding well-wishes and cards from huband Barry Diller, her grandchildren, and her various next of kin. “Tonight is all about family,” the DVF said. “But not just blood. My family goes beyond blood.”

She wasn’t kidding: Working the room of the second floor of her 14th Street store and studio, she played host to a whole slew of von Furstenberg royalists. As the designer pointed out, there was real family, like her son Alexander von Furstenberg and his children; fashion family, in the form of Ahn Duong, Hamish Bowles and Francesco Clemente; and “my baby,” as Diane von Furstenberg said, pointing toward recent CFDA inductee Phillip Crangi. “It can get very complicated,” said Coco Brandolini, who tried to explain her own heritage to von Furstenberg. Turns out Brancolini is second cousins with Alex, and also Lapo Elkann.

Photo: Sherly Rabbani and Josephine Solimene