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July 28 2014

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10 posts tagged "Francesco Vezzoli"

Fashion, Film, and Music Collide at Pitti’s Opening Andrea Bocelli Concert

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Pitti

Spring ’15 marks the 60th anniversary of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana, and thus, a very special edition of Pitti Immagine. In addition to guest brand Z Zegna’s forthcoming show, presentations from up-and-comers like Au Jour Le Jour, and a three-museum installation by Francesco Vezzoli, houses with Florentine roots such as Gucci, Ferragamo, Pucci, and Ermanno Scervino are hosting bashes and celebratory exhibitions. Needless to say, this installment of the Italian fashion fair needed to kick off with gusto, and it did just that last night at the Opera di Firenze.

The evening began with I Costumi Della Sartoria Tirelli—a show comprising of costumes from the storied Roman atelier created between the 1950s through the present. I was particularly taken by the lavish scarlet gown and gilded, pearl-embellished crown worn by Monica Bellucci in Terry Gilliam’s 2005 flick, The Brothers Grimm, as well as the ruffled rose suit donned by Donald Sutherland in Federico Fellini’s 1976 film, Casanova. The latter earned its designer Danilo Donati an Oscar in 1977.
Andrea Bocelli and the Cameristi of the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino - 011
Following a stroll through Tirelli’s sartorial fantasyland, guests including Pitti CEO Raffaello Napoleone and Suzy Menkes were ushered into the theater, where we were treated to a concert from Andrea Bocelli and Patrizia Orciani. You didn’t need to speak Italian to be stirred by the pair’s performance—in fact, Bocelli’s “Ave Maria” encore moved more than a few attendees to tears.

Walking out of the theater, Menkes commented that, while packing at 2 a.m. for fashion events like Pitti, it’s easy to forget how remarkable they can be. If this opener is any indication, we’re in for quite a week.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Create Your Own Fendi Bag With MyBaguette

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Fendi

Few bags launched in the last two decades have been more iconic than the Fendi Baguette. Introduced more than fifteen years ago, the slim style arrived on the scene just as the contemporary obsession for accessories was going into overdrive (the original Baguette fanatic, logically enough, was Sarah Jessica Parker’s Carrie Bradshaw in Sex and the City). The Baguette has since been reworked with countless different materials and embellishments, but it’s getting an entirely different kind of update this week. Debuting exclusively here on Style.com, the new myBaguette app was created by Fendi to give users the chance to create their very own take on the classic design. Users can choose a selection of brushes and shapes and a rainbow of colors to mix and match. You can also upload your own photo and manipulate the image with a range of filters.

“The Baguette was created when I was asked to design an especially easy and functional handbag. The end result needed to be modern, a sign of the times, technological and minimal,” Silvia Venturini Fendi told Style.com. “However, my response was to do the exact opposite—something deceptively small yet simple. The Baguette has been an unprecedented success, re-created in over one thousand variations since its creation. Its clean shape can be treated with any kind of material and workmanship, so everyone can find the Baguette they feel is their very own.”

Fendi

Fendi called on artists such as Sylvie Fleury, Francesco Vezzoli, and André Saraiva to put their own spin on real-life Baguettes (above). Their creations are on view in the myBaguette Art Gallery. Users will also be able to upload their designs to the community gallery and social networks, where Silvia will hand-select her favorite every month. “I am so excited that this app brings the Baguette full circle, into the digital era, giving modern consumers the power to create their own digital version of the Baguette bag,” she said.

Of course, we had to try the app for ourselves here at the Style.com offices. We came up with a graphic black-and-white paint-splatter design, as well as a shocking-pink kaleidoscope pattern. Needless to say, putting your stamp on an icon gets a little addicting.

The Fendi myBaguette app will be available for free on the iTunes App Store and on Google Play starting June 10.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Pitti Reveals Big Plans, Makes Peace

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Pitti

This afternoon, the fashion set chowed down on bacon, rigatoni, and cream sauce, which can mean only one thing: the biannual Pitti Immagine Uomo/W luncheon. Held at downtown Italian eatery Da Silvano, the afternoon gathering gave Pitti CEO Raffaello Napoleone the opportunity to speak with press, buyers, and more about the plans for the Spring ’15 Florence fashion fair—and boy, are there a lot of them. 2014 marks the 60th anniversary of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana (essentially the organizing body for all things fashion in Firenze), so in addition to exhibitions and presentations from emerging and established designers, fairgoers will be treated to a three-museum exhibition by Francesco Vezzoli, who will insert his own work among classical paintings, sculptures, etc.; an opening opera starring Andrea Bocelli; an exhibition of Roman costume atelier Sartoria Tirelli’s confections; a bevy of film screenings; the debut of Nick Wooster’s capsule collection; and more. Also on the docket? Florence-born brands Salvatore Ferragamo, Gucci, Emilio Pucci, and Ermanno Scervino will each host special events.

As reported last month, Z Zegna will be the featured guest menswear designer, but there will be no guest womenswear designer this season due to the many other events on the itinerary. We suppose the abovementioned powerhouses’ Florence-centric projects will suffice. “We don’t want it to be just another fair,” Napoleone told Style.com while sipping a glass of vino rosso. “We want to create a cultural experience.” Provided the itinerary lives up to expectations, it seems he’s done just that.

The overcrowded menswear schedule also came up in discussion this afternoon. If you’ll remember, there was a bit of a tiff between Pitti Uomo and the London Collections: Men last season, as the recently founded London shows conflicted with the Florence fair. “There will be no more troubles in 2015,” announced Napoleone. While the showcases will once again overlap this time around, next season the calendar for all four cities will shift, allowing London, Florence, Milan, and Paris each to have its fair share of time in the spotlight. (This helps explore the new dates for Paris Couture, too.) “This is better for everyone,” asserted Napoleone, telling us that it took one year to reach the final agreement. “Having four menswear events in Europe is a good opportunity because the manufacturers will remain strong and [we] can drive the [menswear] sensibility,” he added. It’s nice to see all the fashion cities (finally) playing nice.

Photo: Tommy Ton

Federico Marchetti Adds Art to Yoox’s Oeuvre

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Federico MarchettiThe impressive second-quarter results posted recently by the Yoox Group, Italy’s e-commerce giant, was further proof that the future of high fashion lies online. But can CEO Federico Marchetti (left) work the same magic with fine art? It has been on his mind since he launched Yoox fourteen years ago. “I’ve always had the notion of the one-stop shop, with a mixture of modern and vintage, clothes and furniture,” he says. “The art component is the one that closes the circle.”

Marchetti tested the waters last October with Damien Hirst, Grayson Perry, and the first-ever edition by Italy’s top Pop artist Francesco Vezzoli. “He did it to help earthquake relief in Emilia-Romagna, where I’m from,” explains Marchetti. “We did an edition of 399 priced at 399 euros, dollars, or pounds.” Yoox is now providing corporate sponsorship for Vezzoli’s Trinity, a series of three exhibitions in three cities, the first in Rome now until November 24, the second opening at New York’s MoMA PS1 in the fall, and the third at the Museum of Contemporary Art in L.A. in early winter.

But any multimillion-dollar business can cough up sponsorship dollars. It was Padiglione Crepaccio (below), the much humbler Yoox initiative during the opening days of the Venice Biennale, which cast a more interesting light on Marchetti’s intentions in the art world. Curator Caroline Corbetta assembled work by ten Venetian artists under 30—the sort of creative types who are usually overlooked when the Biennale’s grand caravan rolls into town every two years—and exhibited the result in the house where three of them live. (A very nice piece of old Venice it was, too, calculated to make starving artists everywhere else in the world utterly puce with envy.) The twist was that the exhibition preview was online. “Like Saatchi, but in reverse,” says Marchetti. “Everyone else got to see it online before the art-world elite got there.” Which didn’t stop heavy hitters like Vezzoli, Diesel’s Renzo Rosso, and cherished art-world provocateur Maurizio Cattelan (a patron saint to young Italian artists) from showing up in person at the opening.

Padiglione Crepaccio at Yoox.comWith his Acne jeans and his Lobb shoes, Marchetti is almost correct when he describes himself as the Yoox customer. And he was setting a good example by shopping for art at Padiglione Crepaccio. (In keeping with the initiative, it was only possible to buy the pieces on the iPads provided, even if you were standing right in front of the art and the artist). Right now, Marchetti is picturing art on Yoox as “something like a TV talent show, 99 percent talent, 1 percent the special X factor.” But going forward, he imagines people picking up “a pair of jeans and a painting” when they visit the site. “It’s part of the plan to make yoox.com a playful lifestyle,” he adds. “But playful in a serious way. It’s not the Amazon approach. We’re serious about collaboration.” Serious enough, in fact, to partner with the legendary photo agency Magnum—its first venture into e-commerce—and Hirst’s publishing company, Other Criteria.

But when Marchetti insists, “Surprise is the beauty of Yoox,” I flip back to the young artists in Venice, in particular a painter called Thomas Braida. With talent like his in the equation, people are going to be picking up way more than one painting with their pair of jeans.

Photos: David Needleman (Federico Marchetti); Courtesy of Yoox

The Bitter Tears of Francesco Vezzoli

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Hidden among the old-and-new runway garb on e-tail megalith Yoox is a funny little last-minute holiday gift courtesy of art star (and W cover artist) Francesco Vezzoli: A new piece, Con Amore, Francesco Vezzoli (Francesco by Francesco), being sold to benefit the Italian National Trust’s relief efforts for rebuilding in the Emilia region after a recent earthquake. If you’ve ever wanted a framed portrait of Prada pal Vezzoli weeping sewn-on tears, today’s your lucky day—presuming you can beat the rest of the interested buyers for this 399-piece edition, which sells for an apropos $399. In a particularly Vezzolian touch, you can shop the precise edition you want: 399 pieces, 399 lots. One through 84 and 398 through 399 are spoken for, as are a grab bag of numbers in between. Find your lucky one if and while you can.

Photo: Courtesy of Yoox.com