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September 1 2014

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42 posts tagged "Francisco Costa"

His Range Is Rio

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With the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics (just 1,548 days away for those of you who are counting) on the horizon, Brazil is hotter than ever. Macy’s is celebrating the vibrant country with its latest campaign, A Magical Journey to Brasil. Enter Francisco Costa for a collaborative capsule collection. “I felt so honored when Macy’s approached me because it is a tribute to my home country,” Costa, who is originally from Guarani, Brazil, said this morning at a preview of the new range. He went on to explain that he drew inspiration from a snapshot of sunshine hitting the pavement—inspiration that comes through in the palette of warm neutrals. Ever the minimalist, Costa’s designs for Macy’s have streamlined silhouettes and modern silver hardware accents that are characteristic of his looks for Calvin Klein Collection, rather than his native country’s more Carnaval-friendly fare. Of course, these pieces come at a fraction of the price. The new line ($135-$180) is Costa’s first foray into fast fashion; it will hit stores later this month.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Clean Lines

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It’s been 19 years since John Pawson (pictured, left) designed the Calvin Klein Madison Avenue store, and he still remembers the experience well. “I think you always learn something from clients,” said the architect, who, fittingly, was celebrating his new book A Visual Inventory with guests like Amanda Brooks and Nora Zehetner (pictured, right) in the shop last night. “Working with the company over the years has been a big influence,” Pawson said. “When I signed the book for Calvin, I also wrote thanking him for changing the way I viewed things.”

In many ways, Pawson’s clean, minimal aesthetic has aligned so well with the brand that it feels like a a natural extension. He still collaborates with the current designers Francisco Costa (womenswear) and Italo Zucchelli (menswear). “He has an amazing eye that’s so modern,” said Costa. “Actually it’s beyond modern; he’s somehow able to make it warm.” Speaking of warmth, Costa has been marrying his native Brazilian sensibilities with design these days. He recently completed a collection for Macy’s inspired by Brazil’s rich architecture culture. “It started with this photo of the Museum of Modern Art in São Paulo that was sun-glazed and in a warm palette,” the designer said. The result is a collection that’s high on the sex factor but with interesting cuts. As for on-the-ground research, Costa affirmed, “Any time is a good time to visit Brazil.”

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com

Are These Fall Gowns Oscar Material?

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Hollywood stylists are forever clambering to keep their celeb clientele in the latest looks fresh off the runways, so there’s little doubt that on Sunday night, we’ll be seeing a few Fall numbers at the Oscars. Compared to many of the ostentatious front-row fixtures at fashion week, most starlets play it safe. (Sorry, Marc, the only actress out there gonzo enough to take your newest lineup for a spin is Helena Bonham Carter). A-listers often opt for classic gowns, like the teal, tie-shouldered number from Oscar de la Renta (the color would be gorgeous with Jessica Chastain’s fiery tresses) or Michael Kors‘ long-sleeved dazzler (pictured), which has Albert Nobbs star Glenn Close’s name written all over it. And with all the attention Rooney Mara attracted at the Calvin Klein show a few weeks back, we wouldn’t be surprised to see her turn up in one of Francisco Costa’s minimal black finale frocks. Many of the heavy hitters won’t be presenting until Paris next week, but it seems some designers have wised up to awards season and are strategically debuting their unseen collections on the red carpet instead of the runway. Case in point: Gwyneth Paltrow at the Emmys, wearing a sheer Emilio Pucci two-piece look that appeared again on the Spring catwalk a few days later. We’re hoping to see a few more of those fashion-forward surprises this weekend.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW, and let us know which Fall designs you’d like to see on the red carpet this weekend.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos / GoRunway.com

A Healthy Breakfast

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On the ride up to the seventh floor of the Museum of Arts and Design today, Arianna Huffington and Maria Cornejo chatted on the need for coffee and other morning matters. It was half past 8 a.m. after all, and Huffington was a panel member for the CFDA Health Initiative’s “A Well-Balanced Life” discussion. (The news magnate was joined by other busy ladies: Elettra Wiedemann, Monique Péan, Karolina Kurkova, and moderator Alina Cho, who brightened the room in a sunny yellow print frock.) The conversation covered practical tips. Huffington, for one, sang the praises of getting a full night’s sleep. “For me, there is nothing more healing,” she told the audience that included Francisco Costa, Joseph Altuzarra, Prabal Gurung, and Olivier Theyskens. She also touched on something she nattily called “GPS for the soul,” which includes activities that keep people centered (read: weekend yoga). Wiedemann, meanwhile, recommended self-development, such as enrolling in graduate classes. And Péan, a former Wall Street banker turned jewelry designer, advised carrying on-the-go protein during fashion week.

With focus turning to the show season and tough casting decisions, the mood veered in a more serious direction. Kurkova related the pressures models face with body weight and image. In her successful career, she has dealt with health issues, she said, and teared up when mentioning her husband’s devout support throughout that rough patch. Huffington talked about her youngest daughter Isabella, who battled an eating disorder at age 12. But if there was one takeaway from the morning go-around, it was that mentors help light the way. Wiedemann said her father was her rock. For example, when she had to wear a back brace as a young teen (“it was real-life Romy and Michele,” she said), he steered her toward swimming. He was also a former model and he met her mother, Isabella Rossellini, on the set of a Calvin Klein shoot. To which Wiedemann cheered to Costa, “Thanks, Francisco!”

Photo: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

In Chelsea, Portraits Of The Artist And The Primate

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Anh Duong was in Chelsea last night, surrounded by a gallery full of Anh Duongs. The painter’s new show, at New York’s Sonnabend Gallery, was devoted exclusively to self-portraits. “I decided I’m going to paint myself because I’m always available and on time,” Duong deadpanned. “So it started as an excuse, basically, and then it became a sort of diary. I’ve been painting myself for the last 20 years.” The portraits, which have the slightly off-kilter fluidity of Alice Neel’s (and the liquid eyes of Margaret Keane’s), show the artist nude and clothed, outdoors and in, with cameo appearances by dogs and stuffed toys. They also offer Duong an ample opportunity to dress up for her sittings, spotlighting a killer collection of frocks, accessories, and jewels. “I think they are also great excuses to use a color or shape or to add something to the painting, to the composition,” she explained. “That’s why I’m interested in painting objects, the bag, the shoes, whatever. I think also the clothes have a personal significance. As I child I would always dress up; I felt like it was some sort of make-believe world, where if the clothes were perfectly put together, then I was safe. It was a response to a chaos around me…I felt like it was this ideal world, so it came naturally that I would use that in my portraits.” A fashion-heavy crowd, including Barry Diller, Carlos de Souza, Calvin Klein’s Francisco Costa, and Phillip Lim, came by for a look. Lim, a friend of the artist, found an especially good reason to keep a sharp eye open. “I think one of our trenches is in here,” he said, before spinning off to have a look. But Duong herself said she preferred to see her paintings as expressions of emotion and technique, rather than portraits, per se. After all, she added, “I really think that every work of an artist is a self-portrait—I just push it further.”

At Paul Kasmin Gallery nearby, the new show by Walton Ford was testing that hypothesis. Ford is known for his large-scale watercolors inspired by the animal paintings of J.J. Audubon and others, but several of the enormous pieces in the new show had no history at all: wall-sized paintings of gorillas mid-scream, without the context of time or place. A portrait of the beast within? The gallery was as thronged with stampeding visitors—Daphne Guinness, Salman Rushdie, Padma Lakshmi, and Olivia Wilde among them—but the artist himself was the picture of civility in a sharply tailored three-piece suit.

Photo: Patrick McMullan/ PatrickMcMullan.com