Style.com

April 19 2014

styledotcom A real-life lodging that puts 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' to shame: stylem.ag/1hUXjLj

Subscribe to Style Magazine
15 posts tagged "Frieze Art Fair"

Yoox.com Gets In The Art Game

-------

E-commerce site Yoox.com has partnered with countless big-name designers and style icons, ranging from Waris Ahluwalia to Iris Apfel. As of today, the brand is adding art into the fold, launching with over 50 artists as well as some of the world’s most prestigious galleries and museums. “It’s an idea I’ve had for some time now,” Yoox Group founder and CEO Federico Marchetti tells Style.com. “It was only natural our next step would be to focus on art. Additionally, the art world has evolved and buyers are keen to access art online—it’s on their radar now.” As Marchetti describes it, Yoox is offering a one-stop shop for the art-inclined, where you can check the latest art world news, browse through contemporary works, learn about the artists, and buy the pieces.

For the launch, Yoox has exclusive works by two of the art world’s most venerable talents, Grayson Perry and Damien Hirst. Perry, for his part, did a boxed set of table maps (entitled The Vanity of Small Differences). The Hirst contributions are two small-scale versions of his renowned Anatomy of an Angel sculpture. As for who’s up next, Marchetti remains tight-lipped. “We can’t unveil just yet what’s coming next, but rest assured, this is just the beginning of an exciting new adventure into the world of contemporary art,” he says. They also plan on expanding their support of emerging artists in the near future. In the meantime, art aficionados can get in on the action at the Frieze Art Fair in London via Yoox (a supporter of this year’s Frieze Sculpture Park in Regent’s Park). He explains: “Visitors to art at Yoox.com will have the chance to visit the exhibition from anywhere in the world. Thanks to a specially created interactive video tour of the garden, they can stroll though the manicured lawns, stop and walk around each sculpture, and enjoy behind-the-scenes info on the works, all from home, without having to brave the English weather!” And who doesn’t like the sound of that? Style.com has a first look at the work from Perry and Hirst, here. Visit Yoox.com now to get a full look at the new-launched art sector.

Photos: Courtesy of Yoox.com

Body Art On The Walls At Grey Area

-------

Grey Area founders Kyle DeWoody and Manish Vora launched their gallery with the mission of blending art and design with functionality. Their latest exhibition, Body Art: A Jewelry Show, now on display at their Soho showroom, is a perfect extension of their unordinary approach. “Body Art is the culmination of a year of sourcing artist-designed or artfully designed pieces for Grey Area,” DeWoody tells Style.com of the jewelry exhibit, showcasing an eclectic mix of pieces from over 30 artist-slash-designers, including Phoebe and Annette Stephens of Anndra Neen (the duo is a growing force to be reckoned with in the accessories market), Italian designer Monica Castiglioni, and Elyse Graham of Elephant Heart. “So many artists seemed to be exploring jewelry as a medium for expressing their creativity, translating their work into a wearable and more accessible form, and as such it has been a successful area for us,” she adds.

Just as on their e-commerce site, which they launched last summer, all of the items on display are for sale, ranging from Anndra Neen’s handcrafted mixed-metals pieces to visual artist Michele Oka Doner’s cast sterling silver Cul-de-Sac clutch to Shelter Serra’s homage to the ultimate status watch, the Fake Roley (coming in at just $40, while the Cul-de-Sac reaches $18,000). Some of the works are new pieces by artists they have been working with for a while, like Dallas-based designer and sculptor Deborah Mullen, and others are just making their Grey Area debut with this show. “Highlights are hard to say as I’m obsessed with it all, but I’m very excited about our newest additions by Chris Platt. He makes extremely interesting pieces out of steel, creating value in the shapes and forms he creates, not the materials he uses,” says DeWoody. Up next for the art insider: She’s headed to London to install a shop, called Bad for Me, within her mom Beth Rudin DeWoody’s show Bad for You, opening October 9 at Shizaru Gallery to coincide with the Frieze Art Fair.

Body Art: A Jewelry Show runs through October 19 at Grey Area, 547 Broadway, NYC, (212) 941-6400. To shop the items in Body Art, visit ShopGreyArea.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Helmut Lang Returns—Sculpturally, At Least

-------

Since his retirement from the world of fashion, Helmut Lang has devoted himself full-time to art—often art that devotes itself to literally tearing up his fashion. For his latest show, the archive seems a bit safer from the scissors; the more than 20 new pieces in Helmut Lang: Sculptures, opening May 5 in New York, are mostly created from rubber, foam, plaster, sheepskin, and tar. Co-curated by Mark Fletcher—recently honored at the Art Production Fund’s annual gala—and Neville Wakefield, the show features both wall-hung works and freestanding monochrome sculptures, which Lang describes as his most figurative work yet. Judge for yourself, left. And if you’re inclined to make a weekend of it, the first New York installment of London’s Frieze Art Fair arrives that same weekend, erecting what its founders claim is the largest temporary structure ever built on Randall’s Island, complete with a pop-up art world hangout (that’d be a Sant Ambroeus café) and parties thrown by Mulberry and Net-a-Porter.

Helmut Lang: Sculptures runs May 5 through June 15 at 24 Washington Square North, NYC. Frieze Art Fair runs May 4 through 7 on Randall’s Island, NYC; for more information, visit friezeartfair.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Frieze Frame

-------

Artist Banks Violette’s massive graphite and gloss canvas at Team Gallery’s Frieze Art Fair booth says, “I would rather be killing my family.” But Valentino, Elle Macpherson, Gwen Stefani, Daphne Guinness, Tom Ford, Courtney Love, and the other attendees at the opening of the ninth Frieze seemed happy to mingle and peruse the art instead.

Even though sales are steadily increasing after the recession, frugality has replaced fashion as a dominant theme for the work on view. There are fewer references to pop culture and luxury, and a more low-tech crafty feel from work like LuckyPDF’s live radio broadcasts, Franz West’s enormous, roughly knotted phallus sculpture at Gagosian, and Dan Colen’s massive chewing gum canvas at Peres Projects Berlin. Mark Hix’s packed on-site canteen contained “credit crunch ice cream,” a conceptually rich dessert of vanilla and chocolate scoops mixed with gold honeycomb and topped with chocolate sauce, half the price of other puddings at just £4.50.

The fair’s most popular participant, however, was an industrious red hermit crab who dutifully carried a replica of Constantin Brancusi’s serene Sleeping Muse sculpture on its back, while navigating through Pierre Huyghe’s aquarium in the Frieze Projects section. The delight this recontextualization of iconic art gave viewers was reflected in Lily Cole’s summation of the Frieze experience while at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise stand, “Fairs or galleries, I really care less about the context,” she said. “I just love looking at lots and lots of good art.”

Photo: Dave M. Benett / Getty Images

At London’s Frieze With Raf, Hussein,
And A Few Giant Purple Horses, Too

-------


Why is London cooler than usual? Because it’s Frieze-ing. But, given that Germans seemed to be the dominant nationality on the opening day of the Frieze Art Fair, it made sense that it was Claudia Schiffer’s open-to-buy budget that was giving gallerists chills. Plus, she was appropriately emblematic of the fashion/art nexus that gives Frieze its special flavor. Case in point: The first person I saw as I sailed through security was Raf Simons; the last, as I headed for the exit five hours later, was Hussein Chalayan. And the day began with a press brunch given by COS, Europe’s favorite “masstige” chain, followed by a curators’ tour of Frame, the new art wing of Frieze, which COS is supporting.

Each invitation to the brunch was accompanied by a hand-penned missal from artists Michael Crowe and Lenka Clayton as part of a project called Mysterious Letters, through which they intend to communicate with every single person in the world. (Just two kids with a dream!) Still, the optimistic monumentalism of their scheme felt typical of Frieze 2010, especially after the flatness of last year’s fair. There was lots and lots of really big stuff, taking a cue from the scale of Frieze itself, with more than 170 of the world’s best galleries on display. Sadie Coles was showing a 13-foot-high fireplace cast in bronze by the Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone; Emmanuel Perrotin had Xavier Veilhan’s high-octane futurist-style sculpture of a carriage drawn by four horses. It was almost life-size. And purple, to make it even more inescapable. (That’s it, pictured above, at a previous installation in Versailles.)

If 2009 featured a strong handicraft subtext, 2010 resurrected that old standby, photo-based work. Chalayan’s favorite was Marlo Pascual on Casey Kaplan’s stand. The Tennessee native’s dramatically repurposed images also captured the imagination of Francesca Amfitheatrof and Carlo Brandelli—and enough museums and collectors that Pascual was a first-day sellout. That’s the kind of new-name success story that offers an uplifting alternative to all the grandstanding that takes place at the blue-chip booths. Not to say that that isn’t enthralling, too. In fact, I’ve got to get me back there tomorrow for some more.

Photo: Florian Kleinefenn/Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin, Paris