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August 23 2014

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11 posts tagged "Garage"

Charlotte Stockdale Talks Exploring Fashion and Her Gig at Garage

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Garage

Last October, British stylist Charlotte Stockdale announced she was leaving her post at i-D, a pillar of British street and underground fashion, and joining Garage magazine as its fashion director. The über-cool stylist’s first efforts for Dasha Zhukova’s biannual art and fashion mag were unveiled today, when issue six hit newsstands. Garage gave us an exclusive first look at its Nick Knight-lensed covers (above), which feature Karlie Kloss and Cara Delevingne. As evidenced by Garage‘s new snaps, Stockdale can seamlessly transition between high-gloss and grit—a skill that no doubt came in handy during her stints at Dazed & Confused and Harper’s Bazaar, and while styling shows for the likes of Dolce & Gabbana and Fendi. She’s worked with Karl Lagerfeld on the latter’s runway looks and campaigns for the last five years. Here, Style.com caught up with Stockdale to talk about the state of British fashion, leaving i-D, and her vision for Garage.

What drew you to Garage?
Everything about it. I remember the first issue coming out and thinking it was something different, courageous, seriously beautiful, and sometimes quite shocking. It’s not safe and it’s incredibly sophisticated. I talked on and off with Dasha about shooting for her, but it never worked because I was too busy with i-D. Then we met for tea after the summer—I was quite relaxed from holiday—and she said she was looking into a fashion director, and obviously that evolved into a conversation.

Did you feel that i-D was no longer those things—courageous, shocking, and beautiful? Is that why you left?
No, that’s not why I left. Not in the slightest. I enjoy conceptual fashion, and there isn’t a lot of space left for it anymore. Garage is a venue where conceptual fashion is still the right thing. When I started at Dazed & Confused at the beginning, conceptual fashion was the thing. I like exploring it on multilayers, not just mixing jackets and trousers for a good picture.

And how does that translate in terms of your vision for this magazine?
I would like to keep a delicate mix of sophisticated and playful. Humor is very important, but it can’t be silly, and beauty is really important. The art content is serious. I don’t mean serious in a way that it is not amusing. Some of it is very amusing, but they put in heavyweights. The fashion needs to balance that out. I love working with the stylish photographers and new photographers and new designers. So far, most of them are saying “yes.”

On the subject of new designers, who are you particularly excited about right now in London?
It sounds awfully predictable to say, but I am very interested in J.W. Anderson and Christopher Kane. London right now has finally hit its stride. There’s Peter Pilotto, Mary Katrantzou, etc., and they have all found this balance between creativity and the business, which are equally important. That wasn’t so much the case when I was young. Some succeeded and others didn’t—the balance wasn’t correct. I have seen so much talent leave Britain and move to other cities. We have always felt it was such a shame that these kids aren’t back at home building proper brands themselves.

How do you think this momentum with London fashion will progress in the next few seasons?
I think the momentum will continue. With Natalie Massenet at the helm of British Fashion Council, everything has stepped up a few notches. Obviously, she is a lady of no fear. These young designers all have solid bases, and they are building proper businesses. The month is a very crowded month, and it is pretty challenging for [fashion] people like ourselves. London used to be a three-day thing and you could miss it. Now it’s a solid five-day event full of high-class content. It is the most interesting fashion week aside from Paris.

Photos: Nick Knight

Garage Magazine Takes It To The Street

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Thanks to Suzy Menkes’ recent T magazine article “The Circus of Fashion,” and the mobs of shutterbugs outside the Fall ’13 runway shows, the hysteria that is street-style culture was a hot topic this fashion month. What’s the obsession? How did we get here? And how is it affecting, and indicative of, the state of the fashion industry? In a new film titled Take My Picture, Dasha Zhukova’s Garage magazine examines all this and more. Through footage of the ever-growing sea of bloggers at fashion week, and commentary from the likes of Proenza Schouler’s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez, Susie Bubble, Phil Oh (who describes street-style snapping as “trench warfare”), and Style.com’s own Tim Blanks, Garage dissects what makes bloggers, and their increasingly wildly dressed subjects, tick. The mini-doc debuts exclusively above, and will be up on GarageMag.com this weekend.

Have Prism, Will Travel

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The weather in Paris this Saturday night was not exactly tropical. But over in Montmartre, Prism London impresario Anna Laub generated a bit of a heatwave. To celebrate the launch of Prism’s new range of bags, Laub decided to throw a house party, replete with tacos on demand, beaucoup des cocktails, an Instagram photo booth, an attic dance party, and, for some reason, a bowler hat suspended from the ceiling near the bar. Tacos in Paris is a surreal enough concept; was this an offhand tribute to Magritte? “Oh god, the bowler hat…,” said Laub, who co-hosted the fete with Garage magazinesters Chloe Kerman and Shala Monroque. “Don’t even get me involved with the bowler hat. I have no idea. It was pretty much improvised party lighting.” It was also a stroke of genius, given that the party’s un-stated theme was, essentially, the randomness of modern jet-set life. “You know, the bags are designed to make travel more functional,” Laub noted, “and I was thinking about the fact that we’re all traveling so much these days, and it’s kind of a crazy thing, that people have friends all over the world, and these lives where they’re in Tokyo one day and then Paris the next.” Yes, it’s all a bit of a glam mishmash. Very tacos in Paris, you might say.

Photo: Courtesy of Prism

You’re so Vain, Cindy Sherman

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Vanity is the theme behind the fourth issue of Dasha Zhukova’s acclaimed Garage magazine. Perhaps not the most surprising subject for a fashion glossy, but the editor’s approach to the concept is definitely original. Garage‘s cover and corresponding spread were shot by Patrick Demarchelier and feature a gaggle of models provocatively posed in looks by Balenciaga, Saint Laurent, McQueen, and Dolce & Gabbana. What’s the twist? Each girl is accessorized with a Cindy Sherman mask created via ThatsMyFace.com. “Cindy Sherman’s work raises such important and challenging questions about the representation of women, both in media and society. There was no better likeness to illustrate issues of identity and facelessness in the fashion industry,” says Zhukova. The artist gave Garage her blessing to create the masks, all of which are based on Untitled #461 (the work was shown in Sherman’s recent MoMA exhibition). However, it would seem Sherman hasn’t yet seen the new issue, which, in addition to the fantastically creepy editorial, includes conversations between Urs Fischer and Neville Wakefield and Boris Mikhailov and Juergen Teller, as well as Aimee Mullins paper dolls and contributions from Theaster Gates, Michael Craig-Martin, and more. “I hope she likes it!” says Zhukova. We suppose we’ll have to wait until the magazine hits newsstands, on February 9, to find out. Unless, of course, she sees the spread’s exclusive debut here, on Style.com.

Continue Reading “You’re so Vain, Cindy Sherman” »

Garage Time

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When Dasha Zhukova released her debut issue of Garage magazine during fashion week last September, The New York Times called it “one of the most intriguing magazines to come along in years.” To jog your memory, recall that cover (there were three different ones) lensed by Hedi Slimane, featuring the lower half of a nude model with a peel-off Damien Hirst sticker on her crotch. One year later, she’s got issue number three ready to hit newsstands September 10. The theme, it would appear, is a little less provocative: time.

“Our themes in the past were not risqué just for the sake of it—it was more that we focused on subject matter that we thought resonated,” she tells Style.com. “We decided to focus on ‘time’ as our theme as it seems to be the one thing that everyone is either trying to buy more of or rush their way through with the increasing presence of technology in our everyday lives. From our obsession with defying the effects of aging to the stress of deadlines that loom in our careers to things as seemingly trivial as arriving ‘fashionably late,’ time touches all aspects of our lives.”

Zhukova brought on the likes of photographers Nick Knight and Juergen Teller to interpret time for the five different covers, all linked to an editorial inside the issue. Knight did a Lichtenstein-inspired shoot with Lindsey Wixson, with text captions by Perez Hilton. “Nick Knight’s shoot and collaboration with Perez takes traditional pop art to the contemporary extreme. It takes an aesthetic that feels almost classical to today’s generation and frames it timelessly with the use of today’s digital shorthand,” she explains. Teller, for his part, photographed the oldest tree in the world with Spanish actress Rossy de Palma as his model. The other three covers include works by artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, John Currin, and a limited-edition vinyl record with a conversation between Marc Jacobs and Currin. Here, Style.com has an exclusive first look at the Knight (pictured, above) and the Teller (pictured, below) covers.

Photos: Courtesy of Garage