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April 21 2014

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7 posts tagged "Gary Card"

Draw Something: Fashion Illustration Takes the Spotlight

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Illustrations by David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Last night in London, Christie’s South Kensington auction house played host to an exhibition and discussion orchestrated by the Fashion Illustration Gallery (FIG). And while the audience sat through the Issa London-sponsored talk, whose panel included Christie’s Meredith Etherington-Smith, illustrator David Downton (whose work is pictured above, top left), and Style.com’s Tim Blanks, they were left wondering: Should astute art investors buy up fashion illustration in the same way the world should have snatched up early Basquiat or Koons? “Before Andy Warhol was Andy Warhol, he was a fashion illustrator,” said Etherington-Smith. “Fifty years ago, the art world debated whether photography was a bona fide art form, and the same is happening now with fashion illustration. I believe there is no doubt fashion illustration is an art, but a vastly underappreciated one.”

The art on display last night represented the old guard like Cecil Beaton, Antonio Lopez (above, bottom left), and Andy Warhol, as well as such new talents as Gary Card (above, top right), Zoë Taylor (above, bottom right), and Tanya Ling. Strange bedfellows? Not according to Downton. “Some of the younger fashion illustrators out there are the most skilled draftsmen,” he said. “They very much should take their place alongside the great artists of days gone.”

Among the questions thrown out to an audience that included Suzy Menkes, Camilla Al Fayed, and Susie Bubble: Will fashion illustration ever be accepted as an art form? And will magazine editors ever replace celebs for illustrations? Downton, perhaps, answered these queries best. “The illustration I did a few years back of Cate Blanchett for Australian Vogue was, against all odds, the fastest-selling issue of the year. It also won the Maggie’s Magazine Cover of the Year. After that, there was no doubt for me that there is a place in the art world for fashion illustration.”

FIG’s exhibition at Christie’s South Kensington runs through December 19.

Illustrations: David Downton, Gary Card, Zoe Taylor, and Antonio Lopez

Celebrities Are House-proud, Too

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BCD cover“I am an interiors geek—I have been slightly obsessed with homes since childhood, and that’s why this project just came naturally to me,” said creative director and now author Rob Meyers on the eve of his book launch. The tome in question is Behind Closed Doors, which catalogs images of twenty-five creative people’s homes, with a twist: They were all taken by the creatives themselves.

Olivier Theyskens, Nicola Formichetti, Courtney Love, Marc Quinn, and Gary Card are among those who participated in Meyers’ first book, which was five years in the making. “I worked with all these crazy talented people and I thought, Hey, I wonder what their homes look like,” said Meyers, whose résumé includes stints with Arena Homme+, POP, Wallpaper*, World of Interiors, and Nylon. “I gave them all disposable cameras and asked them to take pictures of their fave bits in their homes,” said the author of his subjects. “And amazingly, they came through. The cameras came back fully loaded.”

Jeremy Scott FINAL
courtney love

Jeremy Scott’s incredible eighties post-Memphis furniture pieces (above, top) and surreal Ronald McDonald collection; Martha Stewart’s bank of fridges, jars of spatulas, and bowls of eggs; and Courtney Love’s assortment of wedding cake figurines (above, bottom), which includes a pic of her own wedding topper with Kurt Cobain, are just a few of the images included in Meyers’ book. But he insists that this is not what you think: “It’s not like these people have been papped or violated in any way. These pictures are not at all intrusive because [the participants] took the pictures of their homes themselves, and showed as much or as little as they wanted. This comes from their hearts.”

Priced at $29.95, Behind Closed Doors will be available from Rizzoli in March 2014.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Get Ready, Mayfair, Roksanda Ilincic Is Moving In

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Roksanda Ilincic

London’s posh Mayfair neighborhood is about to get a lot less stuffy. Following the launch of surrealist jewelry designer Solange Azagury-Partridge’s Carlos Place boutique this week, and Christopher Kane’s recent announcement that he’ll open a flagship in the tony district before the end of 2014, Roksanda Ilincic—the British designer known for her colorful, feminine wares with a sculptural twist—revealed today that, early next year, she’ll bow her first store at 9 Mount Street. To fete the milestone, she’s teamed up with the ever-eccentric artist-cum-set designer Gary Card to create a neon-splashed installation in the raw space. On view for three weeks, the display features a capsule collection of eight brightly hued Roksanda Ilincic looks, which will be available on net-a-porter.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Roksanda Ilincic

At Gary Card’s Amusement Park, More Freaks, More Fun!

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Gary Card's new solo show

Gary Card is a master at making other people’s visions a reality. He’s become the go-to set designer/prop maker/illustrator/artist for the likes of Lady Gaga, Nicola Formichetti, and Nick Knight, and has worked with such top-tier publications as AnOther Magazine, Dazed & Confused, i-D, and T magazine. (Perhaps you saw the flaming, ten-foot-tall, wicker T he built for the latter back in 2009?) But last night in London, Card took a little “me” time and opened his first solo show, Abandoned Amusement Park, at Dalston’s Eternal Youth gallery. “I am used to building things based on the tastes of other people, and it was quite nice to do something for me for a change,” offered the artist.

The exhibition features strange cartoonish figures created with wire and tape, then papier-mâchéd into ghostlike figures. They each have bulbous noses and a look of horror on their faces. “The idea of something like an old relic being rediscovered fascinated me,” explained Card. “This is meant to represent something that has been left to rot, melt, and die, and the tragedy of that is shown in their faces. Yes, it’s cartoonish, and there are definitely sinister undertones, but that is perhaps the way life should be seen.”

The opening was a significant milestone for Card, and he shows no signs of slowing down. Next on the docket are a project with Roksanda Ilincic; a film with Chris Sutton, for SHOWstudio; and a trip to New York to work with Spring Studios. “It is looking to be a very exciting fall,” he said.

Pleats, Pleasing

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The Olympic Torch wasn’t the only thing to take top honors at last night’s Designs of the Year Awards, given by London’s Design Museum. In the fashion category, Issey Mikaye’s studio and Reality Lab, the designer’s research and development team, won out over a varied group of nominees that included Celine’s Fall ’11 collection, the Met’s Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty exhibition, Sarah Burton’s wedding dress for Kate Middleton, and the London concept boutique LN-CC, designed by Gary Card. Pieces and renderings from the award’s seven categories, which include digital design and architecture as well as fashion, are now on display as part of the Designs of the Year 2012 exhibition, running through July 4. As The New York Times reports, the Miyake inventions from his 132.5 line included in the exhibition “encompass different kinds of modernity: clothes that fold flat, opening with 3D dimensions and made from recycled polyester.”