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August 30 2014

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13 posts tagged "Gia Coppola"

Gia Coppola on Her Family’s Wine Legacy and the Importance of a Screw-Top Bottle

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"GIA BY GIA COPPOLA" Wine Launch Celebration Hosted By Francis Ford Coppola WineryLast night Gia Coppola toasted her new line of Gia by Gia Coppola wines with a wine-o-bacchanal at the Bowery Hotel.

Critics of Coppola’s latest venture will undoubtedly say, “Of course. Wine. Just like her grandfather.” She may be following in Francis Ford Coppola’s footsteps as both director—as she did with her breakout film, Palo Alto, last year—and winemaker, but Coppola’s passion for wine comes from a genuine place. She did, after all, grow up playing in grandpa’s vineyard: “I remember at Thanksgiving, after all the grapes had been harvested, we would take the leftovers and stomp on them in this tiny bucket,” Coppola told us. “We called it ‘Gia’s jelly!’” Other wine-related memories included being too young to have wine with dinner like everyone else, so her mother would pour her a splash of wine mixed with ginger ale or Sprite. “It’s actually pretty good. I still do it sometimes. But now that I’m 27, I don’t have to mix it anymore.”

The wine venture stems from what she and her friends like to drink, she explained: something with good flavor, a reasonable price point, and, above all else, a sensible screw top. “It’s gotta have the screw top. That way you can take a sip, put it away in your backpack, and keep it moving with your friends.” And keep it moving is exactly what she did. After the party had cleared out, Coppola and a group of friends retired to a suite upstairs for a private after-party. And for that elevator ride upstairs, surely those screw-top bottles came in handy.

Photo: Dave Allocca

Resort 2015 Cutouts, Like Built-In Air-Conditioning

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The 2014 Farmers’ Almanac was spot-on in its forecast of a wet, hot summer—at least here in NYC, where city dwellers have been experiencing stickier-than-usual conditions and bucketloads of rain. It’s no wonder we’ve been particularly drawn to the Resort collections’ cool cutouts. Narciso Rodriguez, Joseph Altuzarra, and the Cushnie et Ochs girls were among those who showed body-con dresses featuring razor-sharp incisions. Gia Coppola took a subtler approach to ventilation at the CFDA Awards back in June, when she wore a patterned Proenza Schouler number that exposed just a sliver of abdomen. Meanwhile, Charlotte Gainsbourg turned up on the Cannes red carpet in a holey Louis Vuitton Cruise top, and Anna Dello Russo donned Anthony Vaccarello’s breezy (but not so easy) navy style during the Milan menswear shows.

Here, a slideshow of recent looks with built-in AC.

Taking a Chance on Pants: What We Want to See A-Listers Wearing in Cannes

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Now TrendingBetween last Monday’s Met ball, Spring gala season, and the 67th annual Cannes Film Festival (which officially kicked off yesterday), eveningwear has been at the top of our minds lately. But with all due respect to Charles James and the starlets who aimed to honor his legacy by donning Gone With the Wind-style gowns at the Costume Institute extravaganza, we’ve definitely had our fill of dramatic ball skirts. If there’s one thing we’d like to see more of on the Croisette this year, it’s actresses wearing pants. In our opinion, the coolest girls at red-carpet events are the ones rocking stovepipe trousers with tiny tops or sleek le smokings. Take, as examples, Cara Delevingne’s relatively casual Stella McCartney look at the Met or the crisp white Saint Laurent suit that Gia Coppola wore to her Palo Alto premiere. Standing next to one of them in a poufy dress would make almost anyone feel fussy by comparison.

Designers seem to be championing new eveningwear alternatives, too. Raf Simons’ recent Cruise show for Dior opened with a number of dressy pant looks. And we can’t get enough of the snazzy top-and-trouser combos spotted in the Fall ’14 collections of Joseph Altuzarra, Narciso Rodriguez, and newcomers like Rosie Assoulin, Maki Oh, and Isa Arfen. Considering these convincing options, we’re hoping celebrity stylists decide to take a chance on pants.

Here, a slideshow of red-carpet-ready trousers and suits.

Gia Coppola on Family Film School and Teenage Ennui

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PACE GALLERY Opening of James Franco: New Film Stills

The next Coppola force to be reckoned with—at least according to Zac Posen—Gia, granddaughter of Francis, niece of Sofia, has officially entered the family business with her debut feature film, Palo Alto, starring Emma Roberts and James Franco. Based on Franco’s book Palo Alto: Stories, the film follows a clique of disaffected high schoolers as they quietly booze and grind their way through the glory days. In advance of today’s premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival, Coppola found time to chat with Style.com about directing her mom, learning from her family, and incorporating her own closet into the shoot.

You met James Franco at a party in L.A. What’s it like meeting James Franco for the first time?
I had always been a big fan of his, and my mom had met him while I was in college. She was raving about how nice and intelligent he was. Then I was at a deli with some friends and I saw him there. Later that night I crashed some Hollywood party and I saw him, and my mom dragged him over and he remembered me from earlier that afternoon. He asked me about my photography, and we stayed in touch. I sent him all my photographs, and he sent me his book. He wanted to make it into a movie, long story short.

Does the world of Palo Alto have anything in common with your teen years?
Yes, emotionally, there’s that weird age where you’re too young to be an adult and too old to be a kid and you’re trying to figure out what you want.

Do you relate to the ennui?
I just remember that most of the time you’re looking for something to do, but usually in those moments you’re having the most fun when you’re hanging out in the parking lot and driving around.

What was it like directing your mother?
It was funny because she just kept spiking the camera at the end of every scene and looking at me to see if she did an OK job. It took a while to convince her to do it.

How would you describe your own film education?
I really learned a lot when I worked on my grandpa’s film Twixt and got to be with him start to finish and sit next to him every day. That was my film school.

What was the most valuable piece of advice your grandfather gave you?
He’s always spitting out these amazing quotes. Even just something as simple as eat your breakfast because you need sugar in the morning to get your brain thinking. And be open to your actors’ ideas because they know the characters better than you.

You worked on your aunt’s film Somewhere, in the costume department. How did that prepare you for making this project?
It was nice to just see how Sofia works and her own demeanor that is true to herself, and you don’t have to be this big, authoritative figure. I don’t think I would have thought about directing if I had not seen her do it as a young woman.

The tone and the palate of Palo Alto reminds me a little bit of Somewhere. Is that a coincidence?
Well, we’re of the same blood and I look up to her, so maybe I just can’t help but subconsciously kind of be influenced by her work.

I imagine it would be tricky to have such an amazing resource and not want to take advantage of it. Did you reach out to her?
It was really important for me to figure out my own voice and not feel influenced by anyone else’s opinions, so I really just kind of discussed it with James as my mentor. I didn’t want to kind of get pulled in many different directions—[I wanted to] figure out how to do this on my own.

How did you want to create the feel of high school with its fashion?
So many of the kids on television have really nice clothes, perfect skin and hair. I just really wanted to see a movie that felt authentic to what I observe when I’m watching teenagers out in public. Jack [Kilmer] has really awesome style to begin with, so he just kind of wore his clothes, and I used some of my clothes because we were low budget.

Which pieces of your clothes made it into the film?
Emma has some of my clothes. I wore that yellow vintage sweatshirt on set, and my mom was like, “That’d be a good sweater for Emma, yellow will look good on camera.” So I just took it off and put it on her.

What are you working on now?
I’m writing two different ideas, and I hope that maybe I can work with James again.

Are you thinking of teenagers?
I love the subject matter of teenagers, but next time around I’d like to try something different. Plus, I’m so attached to my teenagers from Palo Alto I can’t imagine working with anyone else.

Photo: Sam Deitch/BFAnyc.com

DVF’s Current Project

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The DVF design machine has been busier than usual as of late. First Diane von Furstenberg went mass—and pint-sized—with a print-heavy collection of designs for Gap Kids. Now she’s teamed with cult-favorite denim label Current/Elliott for a vibrant capsule collection (available now at DVF.com) that is East Coast sophisticate meets West Coast whimsy. The offerings include two pant styles (the Classic Skinny and the Relaxed Straight Leg), a skirt, and a pair of shorts—each of these come in a variety of DVF prints and colors—and of course, a wrap dress (in denim). To capture the essence of this cross-country partnership, Gia Coppola directed a short film. Starring newcomer Tracy Antonopoulos, Ray Liotta, and narration by Aubrey Plaza, the film, entitled Writer’s Block, is a well-conceived fashion fantasy. “I really wanted to do something different. I felt sort of tired of pretty fashion videos,” Coppola told Style.com. While she references Martin Scorsese’s student films and his effective use of voiceover, the short is really a traveling tale of color, kitsch, and a stylish sensory experience. “I wanted to show the clothes in lots of different scenarios,” including, but not limited to, space, the jungle, the beach, and a horror movie. The end result is a perfect cinematic play on the print denim fits. See the full-length video for the very first time exclusively on Style.com, below.

Photo: Courtesy of DVF