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September 1 2014

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49 posts tagged "Giles Deacon"

Gwendoline Christie: Glamazon Warrior

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Most know Gwendoline Christie for her role as the armor-clad Brienne of Tarth on HBO’s fantasy smash Game of Thrones (get ready, the new season kicks off March 31). But when Ms. Christie’s not running through a Westeros battlefield, she’s a full-fledged member of London’s tight-knit fashion pack. You might find her cheering (and we mean cheering) at a good LFW show, squeezed into the front row between Princess Julia and Lulu Kennedy (Christie never misses the runways of close friends like Roksanda Ilincic, Louise Gray, Giles Deacon, and Henry Holland, just to name a few), and the bulk of her GOT press wardrobe was courtesy of pal Richard Nicoll. The six-foot, three-inch actress actually got her start modeling in student shows at the London College of Fashion and Central Saint Martins. “I feel quite passionately about London Fashion,” Christie told Style.com. “I think some of the most creative and interesting and brilliant people I know are involved in fashion, and I’m lucky enough that they’re my friends.”

Naturally, however, playing a die-hard warrior will have an effect on one’s look. “I had to cut my hair for Game of Thrones, which I found really hard. I find it quite embarrassing to admit that, but I think a lot of a woman’s femininity is tied up with her hair. Afterward, I had quite a big style overhaul,” says the actress, noting she used to study film-noir stars and covet a “sex bomb” Marilyn Monroe aesthetic. “Now, I look to people like Jean Shrimpton, Katharine Hepburn, Twiggy, and Greta Garbo in her more masculine stage.” Christie’s since embraced her ultra-androgynous makeover (pretty on trend, if we do say). “I think that’s more interesting—like a modern reimagining of femininity.” Continue Reading “Gwendoline Christie: Glamazon Warrior” »

Three’s A Trend: Dead Girls Walking

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Perhaps all those vampire films and zombie shows (The Walking Dead, anyone?) are finally taking their sartorial toll, because things are getting downright ghoulish on the Fall ’13 runways. It all started in London when Giles Deacon sent out models with white hair and morbid makeup in his Pre-Raphaelite gowns. Kristen McMenamy (above, center), who bookended the show in fluid black and white frocks, was particularly spectral as she glided down the catwalk, and Deacon’s location—the seventeenth-century Stationers’ Hall, which is just down the road from Saint Paul’s Cathedral—seemed ripe for haunting.

Set in a nineteenth-century hôtel particulier, Damir Doma’s Fall show (above, left) also had an underworld air. The models who donned his minimal black, gray and moss looks had powdered faces and eerie gold-shadowed eyes. Not surprisingly, however, the most macabre of them all was Gareth Pugh (above, right). The designer presented his architectural, largely black and white collection in Paris’ nineteenth-century Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild last night. (For an extra-creepy kick, he boarded up the windows to make the grand space look like some kind of decadent haunted house.) Pugh’s models, who had deathly pale faces and blackened eyes, roamed the runway with a disheveled unease. Was it spooky? Definitely. But the undead never looked so good.

Photos: Filippo Fior and Yannis Valmos / InDigital/ GoRunway

Musings with Miu Miu

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Leave it to Miuccia Prada to bring a bonafide “salon” back to London. For three nights only, Mrs. Prada has opened a private members’ club at London’s Café Royal, a nineteenth-century institution where speakers, artists, filmmakers, chefs, and general influencers unite to share ideas. Considering Winston Churchill, Oscar Wilde, and George Bernard Shaw were early patrons, Café Royal was an enlightened choice for Mrs. Prada, who’s an intellectual heavyweight in her own right.

Film, food, art, and, of course, shopping are all on offer at the gilded baroque venue, which, last night, featured talks by Shala Monroque and Gentlewoman’s Penny Martin. The likes of Daphne Guinness, Katie Grand, and Lulu Kennedy sat on velvet couches while discussing the topic of the evening, “female role models,” which, after inspiring a few eye rolls from the gents in the crowd, left everyone riveted in their seats.

Kate Moss, Jamie Hince, Giles Deacon, and more popped by to take it all in, with many lingering in the rooms filled with Miu Miu’s yet-to-be-released 2013 Resort collection. Plus, guests were treated to a special surprise: a collaboration with two of London’s most beloved designers: Vivienne Westwood and Stephen Jones, the latter who, for the first time in his career, ventured away from hats to design a garment. His first sartorial venture? A denim apron.


“Mrs. Prada asked me to collaborate with her, and of course, I was honored to do so,” Jones tells Style.com. “I love aprons, I wear them all the time in the studio when I’m working because I am very hands-on and just make a mess. Aprons really are a symbol of hardwork put in by people throughout history.”

So, is a Stephen Jones clothing line in the works? “Hmm. I think it’s a wait and see—I’ll have to give it some thought, but it must be said that it was fun and challenging to do a piece of clothing for a change.”

It’s A Zoo In London—And The Bears Are Better Dressed Than The Bidders

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Sometimes the gap between London and New York seems infinitely wide. The charity auction scene in NYC, so firmly established and often the model of decorum—and can we say, often quite dull—would not have known what had hit it when confronted by the frequently hilarious and very drunken antics in London last night. Whoever thinks the British are civilized is sorely mistaken. It was like one of those Gossip Girl auction set pieces, taken over by a hard drinking and older version of the cast of Saved by the Bell.


Christie’s auction house in Mayfair was the site of the Children in Need auction. It featured numerous re-fashionings of that charity’s iconic figurehead, Pudsey Bear, by many of the top designers and houses in the fashion world. The stylist and editor in chief of Love magazine, Katie Grand, who curated the event, had ensured that the bears turned out in force. She is, as she would readily admit herself, quite bossy, which proves extremely useful in the mustering of such an event. “It’s really like doing a show!” she said backstage, perfecting the bear running order with their celebrity handlers, each of whom was attired according to the bear’s provenance. That is apart from Sibling’s showgirl, Cara Delevingne (above left) who decided to just dress as a bear herself.

The day before, Grand had mused, “I don’t really know rich people who do this sort of thing. I bloody hope they come.” She had nothing to worry about, they turned out in force. And were on the phones.

Backstage, the gaggle of models, actresses, fashion designers, WAGs (like Abbey Crouch, who did the honors for Norton & Sons, left), and the odd photographer and sports star wrangled with their bears. “It’s bigger than me, this thing!” the petite actress Jaime Winstone said of her Fendi bear. The statuesque Jodie Kidd struggled with the weight of her gigantic suede Smythson bear, made even more difficult by the folds of caftan she had been attired in. Liberty Ross, meanwhile, became so attached to her Loewe bear she started a bidding war for it when she got onstage.


Chloë Moretz (above, right) gave one of the best sells of the evening with her Versace bear: “He’s quite high maintenance. And Audrey, Donatella’s dog, has some issues with him. He had to go.” And Kristen McMenamy’s coruscating and brilliantly unhinged performance with her McQueen bear: supermodel sashaying, the screeching “There are children in need, you know!” and the accosting of one phone bidder who hung up on the model. “I actually thought it was a man when I got on that phone,” said McMenamy, left, afterward. “I said ‘I’ll go out on a date with you,’ but it was a woman and she got offended! That’s improv for you.” (John Waters, give this woman a part.) There was also Marc Jacobs in disbelief at how much his Louis Vuitton bear was selling for: £20,000. And the finale to the event was the footballer Peter Crouch’s robot dance, the voguing of designer Giles Deacon, and the disco turn of the auctioneer, Hugh Edmeades—the international director of auctioneering, no less—with the staff of Christie’s looking on agog.

The online auction, featuring Nicolas Ghesquière’s bear creations for Balenciaga, continues at www.designerpudsey.co.uk.

Photos: Dave J. Hogan/Getty Images

Putting On—And Taking Off—The Best Of British Fashion

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London calls, and the world answers. London fashion week is in full swing, and what better time for an English retailer to indulge in a little justified bragging? Matches tapped London’s best designers for a new installation at its Marylebone flagship, which it debuted over the weekend to a crowd that included Giles Deacon, Norton & Sons’ Patrick Grant, Elizabeth Saltzman Walker, Tallulah Harlech, and the British Fashion Council’s Caroline Rush. The store’s mannequins were ingeniously dressed in key looks by U.K. labels including Stella McCartney, Roksanda Ilincic, Alexander McQueen, Burberry, and Christopher Kane.

Matches’ stock is very English; its clientele, says CEO Tom Chapman, more a mix. “Fifty-five percent of our clientele is online, and half is international,” he said. “We send bucket loads to Australia and China—we’ve gotten used to tiny feet sizes. Then again, we get a lot of cool hunters after that very latest thing—and to be honest, much of that is created by our very own homegrown talent. They do us proud.”

The atmosphere last night on the South Bank, on the other hand, was a trifle more French—à la Moulin Rouge. The foxes were out for the launch of Marios Schwab’s new lingerie collection for Kallisti at the Crazy Horse. And not just the dancers who modeled the lingerie. A renegade (yet fashion-savvy) fox broke into one of the venue’s dressing rooms and chewed through dancers’ Louboutins right before show time.

For Schwab, lingerie has long been a part of life. “My dad worked in the lingerie industry for Triumph,” he said, “so I have always been surrounded by the stuff.” But it may be more topical just at present. “My seamstress is reading Fifty Shades of Grey during every break,” he laughed. “I think these days people are thinking, screw it—literally—we want to enjoy life, and our bodies.” A ten-minute show was enough to titillate the likes of Leigh Lezark, Harley Viera-Newton, Eliza Doolittle, and Pixie Geldof. And that, of course, was the point. “Being provocative is back on the menu in fashion,” Schwab said.

Photo: Courtesy Photo