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April 20 2014

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180 posts tagged "Givenchy"

Dressing for Fame: Petra Flannery on Styling Hollywood’s Elite

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If celebrity status is conferred in red-carpet appearances, then no actress today can compete without the help of just the right stylist. As Kerry Washington once told Glamour after she noticeably upped the sartorial ante, “There were a couple of actresses whom I felt were having the upper hand careerwise—because they knew how to work that red carpet.” A carefully crafted collaboration between stylist and client, the perfect look can create an indelible impact on agents, casting directors, and those of us watching from the sidelines. Straight from the epicenter of all things celebrity, we’ve asked some of the industry’s top stylists to share their experiences and impressions from their perch above Tinseltown. With our new Dressing for Fame series, we bring you an exclusive, insider look at everything it takes to create those iconic moments captured by a million photo flashes.

Petra Flannery

Petra FlanneryWhile Emma Stone has been busy crisscrossing the globe, making head-turning appearances promoting The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Zoe Saldana has just been named the newest face of L’Oréal Paris. And those are just two of the high-profile, red-carpet fixtures whom stylist Petra Flannery counts as clients. Known for her unwavering kindness and penchant for bold, statement-making ensembles, Flannery has relied heavily on her unabashed love of fashion and disciplined approach to shape the relationships she’s formed with stars like Amy Adams, Mila Kunis, and Faith Hill. Her unrelenting schedule and seemingly unbreakable track record have placed her on The Hollywood Reporter‘s Most Powerful Stylists list—and at the top or No. 2 for the past three years running, no less. On the road with Stone, Flannery stole some time away to talk to Style.com exclusively about when she knew she’d made it, what it takes to make it work, and why she still loves the hunt for that perfect dress.

When did you first begin styling?
I began styling over ten years ago.

What was your “made it” moment?
Zoe Saldana wearing Givenchy Haute Couture at the 2010 Oscars. I saw it when the show hit Style.com and I instantly knew it was her dress. The Givenchy team met us in Europe while we were there for work and the rest is history. It was truly a fashion moment.

What is your favorite red-carpet moment to date?
There are many I hold close to me because each has a journey. Right now I’m loving Emma Stone in yellow Versace for the 2014 London premiere of Spider-Man.

What is the most unexpected thing you do behind the scenes for clients?
Trying on clothes myself or making my sister, who works with me, try them on. She’s my muse. It really helps to have an understanding of what a garment is like on yourself so you can see it from a real perspective. It’s extremely useful to see the clothes on prior to fittings and have an understanding of their workings.

What’s your look launchpad? How do you begin the process?
I begin my launchpad process by looking up designers that fit my clients’ profiles. I look for the right shapes, and then colors, patterns, and prints. I have to marry my taste to what my clients prefer—always thinking outside the box, though.

What’s your favorite thing to do once the look is out the door?
Honestly, my favorite thing to do is relax and take a deep breath. The work is done.

What’s your everyday stylist’s necessity?
My iPhone/iPad. My job is very visual, so these tools help me, as I can access Style.com on the go. I also keep photo albums from all of my fittings. I constantly use these pictures for reference to fine-tune alterations, as well as to complete a look with jewelry and accessories.

What’s your personal style mantra and how does it affect the way you dress?
My mantra is “modern, clean, and classic.” For work I’m almost uniform-like: ballet flats, cashmere cardigans, and essentials from The Row. I love fashion, and I personally take a minimalist approach.

Zoe Saldana just signed with L’Oréal Paris. Do you think this will affect her style? And how closely do you work with the client’s makeup artist?
It’s very exciting that Zoe just signed on with L’Oréal. This heightens her visibility as an actress and as a brand ambassador. We’ll continue to uphold her fashion status on the red carpet, and as usual push the envelope. I hope it means even more red-carpet appearances.

When it comes to working with makeup artists, yes, I work closely with them. It’s great to have an input on the overall appearance of a client’s look. So much involves color and pairing the two. It’s nice when hair, makeup, and styling can have creative moments as a team. It really shows.

What advice would you give for someone trying to emulate star style?
Be your own star. Create your own personal style. Take your favorite pieces and blend them with what you love from a certain star’s style. Make it unique but subtle—being fashionable is not being loud. Some of the most stylish people are those who can create with the basics.

If you could swap styles with one client, who would it be and why?
It’s hard to choose a particular client. They all have aspects that I want to have, like skin tone so flawless that they can wear plunging necklines and midriff tops, or an incredible way of wearing unique and unexpected colors…the list goes on. I think the beauty of my job is that I’m around all of these smart and creative women. They are very confident in what they like. I love each of their styles because they are very individual. I guess secretly I take a little of everyone’s style and incorporate it into mine. I’m always trying new ideas and looks, so I get personally inspired.

Photo: Getty Images 

The Right to Bare Arms: Designers Make a Case for Long Vests

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VestsVests. Who needs them? On men, they can look old-fashioned and stuffy. On hipster girls, who tend to wear them with vintage T-shirts and fedoras, they’ve always struck us as a studied affectation. But this season, designers have us rethinking our stance. Newly relevant with tweaked proportions, fall’s elongated vests are more like sleeveless coats to wear layered over sweaters when it’s cold, and then bare-armed long into spring. Dior’s Raf Simons showed a vibrant, ultraviolet style that energized the Dior runway, and we also spotted long vests at Céline, Givenchy, and Victoria Beckham, where they functioned as unexpected, casual alternatives to standard tuxedo jackets and blazers. One thing’s for sure: We won’t be skimping on our chaturanga push-ups in yoga class.

Here, a slideshow of our favorite vests of the season.

Can’t Kick the Swoosh: A One-on-One With Nike CEO Mark Parker

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Nikes

Clad in his signature blazer, light blue shirt, dark jeans, and black sneakers embellished with gleaming white swooshes, Nike CEO Mark Parker took the stage in Barcelona last week like the Steve Jobs of sports gear. A crowd including just about every soccer journalist in the world, along with a smattering of international fashion and lifestyle media, had gathered in the Spanish city, where football is worshiped with religious fanaticism, to see Parker introduce Nike’s latest project: the Magista football boot. (That’s a soccer cleat to you, Yankees.) The new shoes will be worn by more than seventy players during the World Cup in Brazil this June.

The Magista’s radical design features a knit upper with a collar that covers the ankle. Not the most exciting footwear development for those who aren’t concerned with ball control, but as with any Nike announcement, it offered an occasion to consider how the sportswear giant will continue to keep a foothold in style.

Many Nike innovations—Free, Flyknit, Lunar—find a second life in the fashion world. For Parker, who got his start at Nike in 1979 working as a footwear designer, that’s an unintended side effect of the process. Even so, it was impossible to escape the swoosh during the Fall ’14 shows, as everyone from Susie Bubble to My Theresa’s Veronika Heilbrunner mixed Nikes with their high-styled fashion week looks. And then, of course, there’s Riccardo Tisci, whose admiration for the brand has manifested in a much-buzzed-about range of collaborative kicks. Here, Parker talks to Style.com about authenticity, the sport-fashion crossover, and what it means to be an innovator.

“Innovation” is a word that gets thrown around a lot when you talk to people at Nike. From a design perspective, what does the word mean to you?
Well, it is a word that I think, just in the general vernacular, gets thrown around too much and abused. I’m not speaking about Nike necessarily—just in general.

For us it actually means creating a product that is truly new and better, so it’s about improving. We’re a performance-based company; we strive to help athletes get better and realize their potential. But “better” is a key word.

We take input from everyone, so the innovation process at Nike is driven by being incredibly observant; by the relationship we have with athletes; and by the deep, personal connections we have. We don’t just think about what athletes need to perform but what they need as individuals, as people with opinions. It’s not just about performance but aesthetics, too. So all of that gets factored in along with the latest in technologies, materials, components, and processes to improve.

You mentioned aesthetics. Often the big Nike innovations trickle down into the Nike Sportswear line, or they wind up being used by people who aren’t just concerned about performance but about fashion and style. At what point does that enter the equation?
Along the way. In many cases, after the fact. We don’t set out to try to be fashionable. That’s a by-product or a result. That’s fine. But we’re driven by trying to solve problems, and those problems are primarily functional problems.

We do, as I said, take into account the aesthetic, because that’s really important as an athlete—how do you look? When you look at yourself in the mirror, you want to look like you’re fast, you want to look like you’re strong, you want to look like you’re expressive, you have your own personal style. That’s part of the process, but it’s not like we’re sitting there saying, “We need to create something that is driven by trying to be fashionable.”

I think the authenticity and the uniqueness that comes from solving problems—the form that follows the function—is what makes us interesting from a fashion standpoint. Continue Reading “Can’t Kick the Swoosh: A One-on-One With Nike CEO Mark Parker” »

Ten Looks, One Show: The Industry’s Top Stylists Honor the Albright Fashion Library

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FIT x MAC Fashion Library

It’s been over ten years since Irene Albright first opened the doors to the Albright Fashion Library—the more than 15,000-dress-, 7,000 shoe-strong collection of contemporary couture, ready-to-wear, and accessories now housed in a massive 7,000-square-foot loft at 62 Cooper Square. “Irene was working with KCD and saw that people were running around chasing clothes, and she just decided to start buying [important pieces],” recalled the Library’s creative director, Patricia Black. “Eventually, people would come to her saying, ‘Oh, do you still have that sweater? Can I borrow it?’”

Today, after a decade functioning as a sort of dream closet for fashion insiders, the Library is feting its history, as well as the incredible individuals who have pulled from its continually evolving archive, with Albright Goes to School, an exhibition in partnership with the Fashion Institute of Technology and MAC Cosmetics that opens this evening at the Museum at FIT.

“I wanted to celebrate Irene, the Library, the stylists—the people who were working on the inside—the shakers and tastemakers,” said Black. “Without them, we wouldn’t have what we have in terms of this colossal space just packed from floor to ceiling with clothes.”

FIT

The show—a first look debuts here—features individual looks that ten stylists (June Ambrose, Paul Cavaco, Catherine George, Tom Broecker, Freddie Leiba, Lori Goldstein, Kathryn Neale, Mary Alice Stephenson, Kate Young, and Patti Wilson) created using iconic wares from the Library. A Tom Ford goat hair jacket layers over a Comme des Garçons tank in Goldstien’s look; Balmain is mixed with Givenchy and the artist’s own choker and face mask in Leiba’s; and Patti Wilson utilizes a Lanvin body harness to sex up an otherwise high glamour Yves Saint Laurent and J.W. Anderson combo.

There’s a rich history to the institution, and Black, Museum at FIT director and chief curator Valerie Steele, and set designer Stefan Beckman were tasked with expressing that through a tight narrative. “There are some incredible stylists who pulled these outfits, but they each have their own different story,” related Beckman, who described the installation as a “gritty fire escape urban idea.”

Steele added that the Museum’s interest in the exhibition stemmed, in part, from a desire to champion stylists. “People tend to think, Oh, designers make fashion. So it was important to be able to bring in stylists and show that they also have a really important role in putting looks together.”

The ten ensembles will be on display through March 31. The show marks the beginning of a greater collaboration between FIT and the Albright Fashion Library. “Irene is such an eclectic collector of everything from fashion to art to houses to people. So who knows what she’s going to start collecting next and where we’re going to take that,” suggested Black. “[But] I’m excited about the beginnings of seeing how we get to work and inspire the new generation of kids who dream of becoming the next designer, visual director, creative director, fashion editor, stylist, or costume designer. I’m hoping that we can lend a little bit of light to them in this moment.”

Photo:  
Photos: George Chinsee  

Runway to Red Carpet: Rihanna (Also Other Stars) Steal the Front-Row Spotlight

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Miu Miu

When it came to star sightings, the front rows at the Fall ’14 shows gave the Oscars a run for its money. The celebrity set came out strong this fashion season, supporting the designers who dress them for so many of their red-carpet moments. Lupita Nyong’o, who brought home an Academy Award this past weekend, was spotted in the front rows of Miu Miu and Calvin Klein Collection, both of which helped her top best-dressed lists during her promo tour for 12 Years a Slave, as well as the awards season. At Miu Miu, she turned up in a burgundy jacket with an embellished collar by the label and a light pink miniskirt, while for Calvin Klein Collection, she donned a pale knit dress from Pre-Fall ’14. Jason Wu’s debut at Hugo Boss in New York also brought out a bevy of stars, including Gwyneth Paltrow, Reese Witherspoon, and Diane Kruger, who led the standing ovation at the show’s close.

Notables were also spotted in the front row of Burberry Prorsum‘s London show, a favorite among Hollywood’s elite. Naomie Harris looked on in a long, navy velvet devoré and a green gown. In Milan, Jeremy Scott’s first runway show for Moschino brought out celebs known for their playful fashion choices. Rita Ora and Katy Perry were among the front-row dwellers in looks from the Pre-Fall ’14 lineup.

Despite all of the big names who attended the Paris shows (including Jared Leto, Keira Knightley, and Kanye West), all eyes were on Rihanna. RiRi stole the spotlight, turning up at all of the biggest shows like Chanel, Dior, Givenchy, Miu Miu, Lanvin, and Stella McCartney, just to name a few. While it’s difficult to choose a highlight from her flawless arsenal of looks, we were particularly taken by the Melitta Baumeister, Hyein Seo, and Adam Selman mash-up she wore to Comme des Garçons; her gray peplum jacket and fur shrug at Lanvin; and the sexy LBD she paired with stockings and a cherry Pre-Fall ’14 mink coat at Dior. She was a street-style photographer’s dream from start to finish.

Here, more front-row highlights from the Fall ’14 shows.

Photo: Courtesy of Miu Miu