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July 29 2014

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191 posts tagged "Givenchy"

Runway to Red Carpet: Celebrity Fringe and Rihanna’s Latest Surprise

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When it comes to fashion, the red carpet can often be filled with the same old, same old. But now and again, some bold celebrities shake things up with experimental, next-level looks. Here’s what’s feeling fresh this week.

RihannaWe’re halfway through steamy July, and this week, A-listers were looking for ways to stay cool on the red carpet. Luckily, the Resort ’15 collections (which won’t hit stores until November but have been popping up on celebs since their Spring debut) offer some crafty cutouts. We noticed a few stars beating the heat with dresses boasting built-in air-conditioning, if you will. Kate Hudson and Allison Williams tried the trend at a screening of Wish I Was Here on Monday in New York. Hudson was statuesque in a black Michael Kors Resort ’15 column with a sequin bustier, and Williams chose a ladylike Altuzarra Resort ’15 sheath. On Wednesday, Nicola Peltz stepped out in an ebony ensemble with a keyhole cutout from Balmain’s Fall ’14 runway. She paired a gold-embellished crop top with a banded leather skirt for the Rio de Janeiro premiere of Transformers: Age of Extinction.

Elsewhere, two of our favorite redheads got on board with one of Spring’s hottest hair trends, turning up on the red carpet with freshly chopped bangs. Jessica Chastain’s fiery fringe perfectly complemented her navy lamé Mary Katrantzou Fall ’14 gown, and Emma Stone sported hers with a flowy purple Dolce & Gabbana Fall ’14 look.

Last, but certainly not least, RiRi, ever the daredevil, surprised fans by turning up in an Alexander Wang LBD and a gold Givenchy-esque septum ring at an event in Rio de Janeiro after Sunday’s final World Cup match. We have to hand it to her, just when we think we’ve (quite literally) seen it all, she manages to surprise once again. Here, a roundup of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: Gade / AKM-GSI

A Pretty Scandal: Revisiting the Fifties at the Palais Galliera

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Fifties dresses

Long before Olivier Saillard arrived to shake things up as director of the Palais Galliera, the fashion museum of the City of Paris had established a tradition of mounting exhibitions around a given decade, such as the twenties or thirties.

With The 50s: Fashion in France, 1947-1957, which opens on July 12, Saillard sought to honor that heritage and also remind the world that the fifties, at least in fashion terms, was a few years ahead of the Gregorian calendar. “It was really that revolutionary bomb of Christian Dior’s New Look in 1947 that brought the decade into the fifties,” Saillard commented during a preview. A decade later, Mr. Dior died suddenly and his young assistant, Yves Saint Laurent, moved to the helm. In between those bookends flourished what was arguably the last golden era of couture. “I like the idea of putting the couture heritage out there, because right now we’re seeing several young designers who are redeveloping it in their own way,” observed Saillard. “It’s also an era that’s joliment scandaleuse [prettily scandalous] as much at the beginning as the end.”

The Galliera’s considerable trove includes a lot of Dior. (Consider for a moment that by the mid-fifties, Dior alone accounted for 49 percent of French fashion’s total exports.) A Bar suit stands sentry at the entrance, followed swiftly by the rose pink Bonbon dress from Dior’s first collection and the asymmetrical peplumed Bernique (Winter ’50-’51), a recent discovery. But Saillard and his team bring to the fore other remarkable, iconic wares, including a 1954 Chanel suit (a look the Americans were quicker than the French to embrace, he noted, precisely because it was made to be worn from morning to cocktail hour). Elsewhere, a 1954 black Balenciaga suit that looks as though it could have stepped off the runway yesterday keeps company with pieces by Carven, Balmain, Fath, Givenchy, Cardin, Schiaparelli, and Saint Laurent, among others. All-but-unknowns get play, too, such as Jean Dessès, Grès, Henry a la Pensée, and Jacques Heim, a star of the time who costumed films such as Falbalas (known in English as Paris Frills).

“There’s a real feeling of destiny about this decade,” observed Saillard. “When you map out the stars, there are so many houses we still talk about. Givenchy, Saint Laurent, and Karl Lagerfeld were taking their first steps in fashion, and it’s also a time when future greats, such as Christian Lacroix and Jean Paul Gaultier, were born. So many names are anchored in that decade in one way or another, it’s very strange.”

The show’s staging resurrects old nuggets from fashion’s lexicon (day suit, day dress, late-afternoon dress, city dress, tea dress, travel coat, etc.), a reminder of how much things have changed. “Today it’s just a dress,” quipped Saillard, rattling off a few numbers that speak volumes, too: There were 106 couture houses in Paris in 1946, a number that had dwindled to thirty-six by 1958.

Given that there are more than a hundred pieces displayed, highlights are too numerous to list here, but they include clever beachwear (a yellow popover by Hermès practically begs for re-edition), accessories, and evening dresses once worn by style icons: the Duchess of Windsor’s Palmyre dress by Dior (1952) is one of the museum’s most precious pieces. Nearby, the 1957 Opium dress from Dior’s last collection (Winter 1957) was donated by Best Dressed legend Jacqueline de Ribes, who will be the subject of her own exhibition at the Met next year.

The 50s: Fashion in France, 1947-1957 runs from July 12 to November 2 at Paris’ Palais Galliera

Photo: Courtesy Photo

EXCLUSIVE: Diesel’s Nicola Formichetti Dresses Bey, Jay, and Blue Ivy

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Bey

“Finally, we can tell the world!” laughed Nicola Formichetti over the phone this morning. What’s the big news? That he and Diesel dressed Beyoncé, Jay Z, and a bevy of backup dancers for the just-launched On the Run tour, of course. “I haven’t done a tour since Gaga, and that was a couple of years ago, so this is really exciting. Beyoncé just brings it out there. She brings it to another level.”

It all began after Formichetti’s blowout debut runway show for Diesel, which marched down the catwalk in Venice last April. Queen Bey liked what she saw, and asked Formichetti to make her five custom Fall ’14-inspired ensembles for the Bonnie & Clyde-themed tour. But dressing Beyoncé, Formichetti admits, isn’t quite the same as costuming more sartorially eccentric stars like Mme. Gaga or his latest project, Brooke Candy. “With Beyoncé, we wanted to do something real,” explained the designer. “She’s a real woman, a real bombshell, and it was all about showcasing this strong, fierce woman. So we focused on her body, and used super-stretchy denim for [last night's] jumpsuit, which just makes her tits and her ass look even more amazing than they already do.” Indeed, the abovementioned jumpsuit, featuring frayed edges and chain and stud embellishments, does just that. A sketch of the look debuts exclusively here. According to Formichetti, the singer will rotate various Diesel ensembles throughout the four-month tour.

bey sketchFormichetti, who first worked with Bey when she costarred in Lady Gaga’s “Telephone” video back in 2010, said that she and her team were very hands-on. Before the intense week of final fittings, the pop star browsed through the collection with Formichetti and was particularly drawn to a denim, flame-embroidered jacket. “It was basically a direct copy of a piece from the archive, and she was like, ‘OMG! I wore something like this in the nineties for Destiny’s Child!’” he said. As for the musician’s epic style evolution, he offered, “I think she’s just refined her whole look. And I love that she can do both: She can be a cool street girl or a goddess and she’s still Beyoncé.”

Formichetti told us that working with Mrs. Carter was not only a personal coup, but a big moment for Diesel, too. “We’re up onstage next to Tom Ford, Givenchy, and Versace—they’re the other brands that worked on the show—and as a non-high-fashion brand, that’s very exciting. It shows that our work is at that level. Even Beyoncé, when she was picking out pieces she wanted from the Fall collection, was saying, ‘Diesel’s back!’ It was great,” recalled the designer, later hinting that more collaborations might be in his and Beyoncé’s future.

But it’s not just Bey, Jay, and their onstage crew that Formichetti is dressing—Blue Ivy is getting in on the action, too. “We’re making her a little bomber jacket with ‘Blue Ivy’ written on the back.” Apparently, it will match Mom’s Diesel Fall ’14 leather topper, which she had embroidered with the word Texas—her home state.

Photos: Courtesy Photo; Stevens Anazco

EXCLUSIVE: Here’s Your Video Invite to Givenchy’s Fall Rave

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Riccardo Tisci hosted a private party in a London hotel suite and only a few people made the guest list, including models Mariacarlo Boscono, Julia Nobis, Jamie Bochert, and Kendall Jenner. (Oh, and never one to miss a party, Peter Brant Jr. made the cut as well.) Party dress code: Givenchy Fall 2014 only. Tisci enlisted photography duo Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott to capture the models sporting his latest looks, including sheer, pleated skirts; softly printed dresses; and pussy-bow blouses. The resulting images make up the buzzy Givenchy Fall 2014 ad campaign. In case you weren’t invited to Tisci’s rave, we’ve got the video to watch right now. Here, the film makes its world premiere exclusively on Style.com.

Video: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

Thomas Tait Is Top Dog, But Everyone’s a Winner at LVMH

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Thomas TaitThe atmosphere at the LVMH headquarters was electric this afternoon, as reporters, photographers, finalists, jury members, and designers all mingled before the big reveal of the inaugural LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers winner. London-based Canadian designer Thomas Tait, who won the Dorchester Collection Fashion Prize back in 2010, came out on top. “I was shocked,” he told us while sitting next to his gilded trophy. “I thought, Did that just happen?” Tait is now looking at 300,000 euros of financial support and a year’s worth of business mentoring and production advice, and naturally we were curious as to his next move. “A nice dinner, a good night’s sleep, and I need to call my mom and dad,” he said. But after that, he might take another step toward that handbag he’s been thinking about. Menswear, though, is “not such an emergency.”

The ten runners-up (formerly eleven, but Julien Dossena shuttered his line Atto to focus on his work at Paco Rabanne) were not forgotten—and they were awarded for their efforts. After taking the podium, LVMH’s Delphine Arnault first presented three students, Flavien Juan Nuñez, Peter Do, and Teruhiro Hasegawa, with 10,000-euro grants plus one-year internships with Dior, Céline, and Givenchy, respectively. Then, Arnault announced that the jury, which included designers Karl Lagerfeld, Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Humberto Leon, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, had decided to create a special prize of 100,000 euros each for two runners-up. Those honorees were Shayne Olivier of Hood by Air and Indian sisters Tina and Nikita Sutradhar of Miuniku. Currently based in Mumbai, the latter are moving their camp to London next year, with plans to show at London fashion week.

LVMH prize

Even those who walked away without a hefty purse were grateful. “It’s already been incredible in terms of exposure and meeting people—it’s like you win right out of the gate,” mused finalist Chris Gelinas. When asked about the final presentation, in which each designer, accompanied by two models, got ten minutes in front of the jury, he replied, “It felt a little like the Last Supper—all these important people lined up at one long table. I remember thinking, What did I just say to Karl Lagerfeld?

“I really appreciated the very different personalities and expressions. It was very interesting,” said jury member Ghesquière. “They all really have a vision, a story to tell, an expression, and a signature. That’s formidable. As for the jury, there was a real camaraderie,” he added, before slipping out of the room and back to work. Lagerfeld noted that the best part of the process was “having everyone all together, we never see each other because we’re working. But I hate that I want everybody to win and that’s not possible.”

“I am thrilled. It was so interesting and original. All eleven candidates were of such excellent quality; each had their style,” offered Arnault. “They are tomorrow’s great talents.” Asked if she thought the contest would draw even more than this year’s 1,221 candidatures, she replied, “I hope so!”

Photo: Getty Images; Tina Isaac-Goizé